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A comparison of laertes to hamlet poem

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We now come to a remarkable and vivid portrayal of the king 's ingenious villainy. With crafty skill he forms and fashions Laertes to his nefarious will, as clay in a potter's hands.

  • The King, surprised and startled, is scarcely able to believe his eyes, and in sheer bewilderment turns to consult Laertes;
  • Claudius in reply, protests that he is not a dull weakling to be branded with fear in face of danger; and when, in the hope of speedy news from the ambassadors, he proceeds to offer proof, he is interrupted by the sudden entrance of a messenger with letters for the King and Queen from the lord Hamlet;
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If in a former brief appearance, Laertes left a good impression, he now destroys it by actions which disclose his real character. Naturally impetuous, fiery of temperament, and ruled by passion rather than by reason, he reveals himself, on returning from his libertine life in Paris, as indifferent to noble ideals of honor and of justice, and willingly agrees to become the base tool of a crafty criminal.

  1. If, of the two conspirators, Claudius is the master villain, Laertes by his own suggestion of the use of poison, proves himself no mean adept in the ways of infamy.
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  3. It was customary for the newly-crowned monarch to stand on the Mount of Defiance at Pressburg, and unsheathing the sword of State, to extend it towards the four quarters of the globe, challenging the world the while to dispute his claim.
  4. Laertes in smothered feelings of disgust at the fears and weakness of the King, recounts his dual loss as motives for insisting on revenge, and in reference to his sister's perfections, makes a beautiful allusion to an olden ceremony at the coronation of the Kings of Hungary.
  5. The Riddles of Hamlet.

If, of the two conspirators, Claudius is the master villain, Laertes by his own suggestion of the use of poison, proves himself no mean adept in the ways of infamy. By forcing upon our notice the deep contrast between Hamlet and Laertes, the Poet in the present scene seems intent upon a further glorification of his hero. The whole scene is a strong sketch in black and white, in which the evil traits of Laertes, serve to illuminate all the more the nobility of Hamlet's nature.

The curtain rises on the two conspirators in secret conference.

The King is supposed to have narrated to Laertes what the audience knows well already: In consequence, Claudius claims the friendship and alliance of Laertes; since both are animated by the same purpose of revenge.

Laertes, however, cannot understand why the King, even when impelled by his own safety, did not vindicate the law against so capital an offence.

Laertes vs. Hamlet

Claudius assigns two reasons: On the other hand, "the general gender," or common people love him so highly that his faults seem graces in their eyes; and any attempt to punish or restrain him, would appear as so many injuries perpetrated against his innocence and good qualities: Laertes in smothered feelings of disgust at the fears and weakness of the King, recounts his dual loss as motives for insisting on revenge, and in reference to his sister's perfections, makes a beautiful allusion to an olden ceremony at the coronation of the Kings of Hungary.

It was customary for the newly-crowned monarch to stand on the Mount of Defiance at Pressburg, and unsheathing the sword of State, to extend it towards the four quarters of the globe, challenging the world the while to dispute his claim.

Claudius in reply, protests that he is not a dull weakling to be branded with fear in face of danger; and when, in the hope of speedy news from the ambassadors, he proceeds to offer proof, he is interrupted by the sudden entrance of a messenger with letters for the King and Queen from the lord Hamlet. In a refinement of irony, the letter to Claudius shatters his dream at the moment when he is gloating over the prospect of soon communicating to Laertes the news of Hamlet's execution.

The letter, formal and diplomatic, informs him that Hamlet has returned alone to Denmark, and promises to recount to him on the morrow the occasion of his sudden and strange return. The King, surprised and startled, is scarcely able to believe his eyes, and in sheer bewilderment turns to consult Laertes.

He, though equally lost in surprise, rejoices at the news; the prospect of challenging on the morrow the slayer of his father causes his heart to glow still more with its mad sickness for revenge.

  1. The curtain rises on the two conspirators in secret conference.
  2. If in a former brief appearance, Laertes left a good impression, he now destroys it by actions which disclose his real character. Claudius assigns two reasons.
  3. The whole scene is a strong sketch in black and white, in which the evil traits of Laertes, serve to illuminate all the more the nobility of Hamlet's nature. The Riddles of Hamlet.
  4. Claudius assigns two reasons. The letter, formal and diplomatic, informs him that Hamlet has returned alone to Denmark, and promises to recount to him on the morrow the occasion of his sudden and strange return.

How to cite this article: The Riddles of Hamlet.