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A list of words often misused in everyday communication

Posted by rachelwriter on September 1, 2009 Photo Courtesy: A friend had commented on a photo of a marathon runner, and the caption read something like this: What my friend meant to say was that the runner was as fast as a bolt of lightning—a flash of intense electric light that illuminates the sky during a storm.

So take note and learn! Their — Their apartment smells funny. Two — I rang the doorbell two times. Too — I rang the doorbell two times, too. Its — The cat likes its new treats.

Peak — The peak of the mountain is covered in snow. Compliment — He paid her such a nice compliment. Complement — Her shoes complement her dress very well. One — When he asked me to marry him, I knew he was the one. Won — He won me over with his good looks and charm. Feet — My feet have blisters on them from wearing uncomfortable shoes.

  1. Harvard linguist points out the 58 most commonly misused words and phrases.
  2. Tore — He tore a ligament while playing basketball. Without a belt, her pants are loose on her waist.
  3. Are, Our Are verb.

Feat — Negotiating the terms of the treaty was a diplomatic feat. Toe — Ouch, I stubbed my toe. Tow — When the car broke down, the mechanic had to tow it back to his garage. Creek — The children caught tadpoles in the creek. Creak — The old floorboards may creak when you walk on them.

A list of words often misused in everyday communication

Read — I prefer to read magazines instead of books. Reed — The marsh was overgrown with reeds. Read — I read twelve books last month.

  • Whatever you do, do NOT make these same mistakes!
  • Exercise 1 Complete the following sentences by selecting the correct word;
  • Study the list of commonly confused words.

Air — The air in Atlanta is polluted. Heir — Prince William is the rightful heir to the throne. Hare — The hare lost the race to the tortoise. Wield — Gangs wield a lot of power in this neighborhood. Wheeled — The server wheeled in the dessert buffet. Threw — He threw a fastball. Butt — He stepped on a lit cigarette butt and burned his foot. Die — Most patients who suffer from the disease will die.

Dye — She wants to dye her shoes to match her handbag. Wine — When consumed in moderation, wine has a number of health benefits. Road — Mary passed her road test and got her license. Rode — John rode his bicycle home from school.

  • Before joining Xulon Press in 2016, she marketed academic religion textbooks and reference resources with Fortress Press in Minneapolis;
  • Editors are used to locating misused words and phrases, and can help by calling out errors that have slipped past you and offering simple solutions.

Pair — I have one pair of black socks. Pear — I ate a pear with lunch. Tail — The dog is wagging his tail. Tale — My favorite fairy tale is Cinderella. Fisher — Seals are fishers; they catch fish for food. Whole — He ate the whole watermelon. Hole — The dog dug a hole in the backyard. Board — The board of directors voted unanimously to fire the CEO. Bore — PowerPoint presentations are such a bore. Boar — Settlers in this part of the country hunted wild boar to survive.

Ensure — To ensure your safety, please fasten your seat belts. Sight — She has poor sight and needs to wear glasses. Site — This is the perfect site for a new mall. Mite — The dog had a mite in its ear. Effect — Nausea is a common side effect when taking this medicine.

Commonly Confused Words

Be — She wants to be a butterfly for Halloween. Bee — His ankle swelled after the bee stung him. So — He has so much homework to do. Sew — She decided to sew an extra button on her shirt.

Aunt — Aunt Matilda knitted me a scarf for Christmas. Ant — The ant crawled into our picnic basket.

Pore — They pore over their study materials before every exam. Pour — They pour water over their heads to cool off after a race.

  1. Good luck and bon voyage on your journey to rid your writing of pesky misused words!
  2. Heir — Prince William is the rightful heir to the throne. Means really or truly.
  3. The following strategies can help you avoid misusing confusing words.

Tore — He tore a ligament while playing basketball. Tour — We took a tour of the museum. Weak — Her illness made her quite weak. Berry — The berry flavored ice cream is delicious.

Surviving the Vagaries of the Freelance Life

Bury — The dog will bury its bones in the backyard. Whether — The jury must decide whether to sentence him to death or to life in prison. Weather — The weather in San Francisco is beautiful year-round.

  • Posted by rachelwriter on September 1, 2009 Photo Courtesy;
  • This millisecond of light may not seem like enough to effect the precious document, but supposed how much light could be generated when all those milliseconds are added up;
  • Heir — Prince William is the rightful heir to the throne;
  • Means to create a change.

Whatever you do, do NOT make these same mistakes!