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A synopsis of andrew niccol s film

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  • Consciousness is recorded, like video, and uploaded to the ether;
  • Those without a surplus of time are always working, always running;
  • In Time feels like two competing movies in one;
  • I also assumed that the fact that everyone in the movie gets to look 25 was a way to increase the box-office potential of the movie by casting only young, pretty faces.

Niccol drives Justin Timberlake like a taskmaster. The singer-turned-actor runs like crazy, jumps, fights, and sweats his way through a movie that all too often feels more detached than a severed limb.

Filmography

The detachment is due to the always on-the-nose, never close to subtle language used to wield the core concept as a club against economic disparity. I could never take the movie seriously because it was always so insistent about Making a Point. In Time, as written, is perhaps meaty and clever enough for a Twilight Zone episode. Stretched to feature length it is an unconvincing attempt at world-building and simply a deeply silly take on Bonnie and Clyde.

In Time wants to be a lot of things, but it never commits to any one. This story is burdened by serious conceptual overhead. People are genetically engineered to stop aging at 25. At that point you get one more free year and then have to earn, or inherit, every minute of the rest of your life.

If this is all meant to tie together into a unified portrait of a stagnant society then the point is made, if not with much force. I also assumed that the fact that everyone in the movie gets to look 25 was a way to increase the box-office potential of the movie by casting only young, pretty faces. This is a future where nearly everyone is drop-dead gorgeous.

Whether that strategy is successful as a business tactic remains to be seen. Even with all the overhead, I was ready to believe In Time.

Will Timberlakewho is perpetually on the go trying to earn a living, is a good lens through which to view this society.

Anon review – Andrew Niccol’s killer-hacker thriller suffers from identity theft

Those without a surplus of time are always working, always running. There is a clear analogy to a recognizable real life, where many people seem to work far more than they do anything else, and rarely have any big gains to show for it. Some plot points occasionally feel inexpertly pruned.

  • The police find themselves unable to identify the killers;
  • Frieland is working a particularly weird case;
  • Those without a surplus of time are always working, always running;
  • My acceptance of the film and its characters broke at that moment;
  • Someone has been killing people and, just before the fatal shot is fired, been hacking into their consciousness for some sadistic reason:

That cabal is another stillborn subplot. That action and accompanying criticism boils down to: Furthermore, while on their outlaw kick, Will and Sylvia engage in one criminal act that dissolved any belief I might have had in either person.

Will is rebellious but ultimately trying to be moral throughout most of the film.

  • These pop-ups appear and disappear with dizzying speed;
  • Is she now simply whacking clients, having relieved them of their cash?

That is, except for this one moment, where he does something that seemed to me more damagingly criminal, and more selfish than his other actions. I saw it as being well out of character, and something that has no apparent effect on his psyche. My acceptance of the film and its characters broke at that moment.

There are some good ideas here, and it is a shame to see them die on the vine. The economic criticism withers under the glare of action-movie outlaw dreams. There are valid, if obvious observations about the ways in which the poor are marginalized and worked until death, but almost no developed thoughts or comments about the situation.

Niccol, who also scripted, finds no greater success in crafting a slightly futuristic thriller. The movie feels empty, hollow and false.

In Time feels like two competing movies in one: There is no better time to release at least one of those movies than right now. But cramming them both into one container where they might meld into a unified whole proved to be far too optimistic. You might as well hope that divided economic classes will abruptly decide to hold hands and work together.

For film reviews, the 1-10 scale breakdown goes like this: