Homeworks academic service


Can we trust our emotions in the pursuit of knowledge

Emotions in the Pursuit of Knowledge Can we know when to trust our emotions in the pursuit of knowledge? Emotions themselves are perceived as unreliable because they vary for each individual.

  1. Yet, we use them to acquire the many Areas of Knowledge that we know.
  2. In the pursuit of knowledge, one must be able to recognize their emotions and know when to trust them. For example, the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001 may spike a severe emotional reaction because of the tragedy of how many people were lost in the attack as well as the fear it created toward the Middle Eastern races.
  3. What if one day, like me, a kid who had believed in Santa Claus for 7 years caught their parents late at night placing presents under the Christmas tree From. My captivation with human physiology motivates me to continue learning about it and encourages me both to attain, and comprehend the information.
  4. Emotions themselves are perceived as unreliable because they vary for each individual.
  5. Often, I get frustrated while working through key concepts, to the point where my ability to reason and comprehend information is impaired. In this case, trusting our emotions can hinder growth in knowledge.

Yet, we use them to acquire the many Areas of Knowledge that we know. Emotions may be a way of knowing, as they help us respond to certain situations. The question is can we trust them to direct us correctly to acquire knowledge; do they just lead us to subjective rationalization, or is there a certain extent where we can trust our emotions?

To answer the question, we must first define emotion and knowledge. Thus, through sense, perception and experiences in life we acquire knowledge and our blank slates are filled tabula rasa. Since day-to-day emotions influence almost all forms of perception affecting our actions and knowledge acquisition, we can only sometimes know when to trust our emotions in the pursuit of knowledge.

Created by WS-71, 2015

Therefore, emotions can motivate us in the search for knowledge and also grant and help us understand knowledge. Nevertheless, emotions can also hinder our judgments and senses. In result, we do not openly welcome all knowledge including those that may displease us and betray us by allowing us to learn imperfect knowledge In many cases, reason receives more credibility than emotions in our pursuit of knowledge.

We often disregard the fact that emotions are what trigger our interests to acquire knowledge.

Found what you're looking for?

Our emotions inspire us in the pursuit of knowledge and provide us with subjective knowledge of our own souls. For example, I personally dislike the Gas Laws subject, as they are extremely time consuming for me. Often, I get frustrated while working through key concepts, to the point where my ability to reason and comprehend information is impaired.

However, although I come to understand the material due to its necessity by the syllabus, my dislike of the topic denies me any emotional linkage with the knowledge — impeding my pursuit of knowledge, and my long-term memory of the information.

However, I enjoy learning about the anatomy and applying that knowledge while performing heart dissections in HL Biology. My captivation with human physiology motivates me to continue learning about it and encourages me both to attain, and comprehend the information.

Furthermore, in the pursuit of knowledge, knowledge cannot be confirmed unless that person has experienced it. Experiences attach emotions to knowledge through sentiments and relevance with the knowledge. In history textbooks, we read of the Vietnam War during the Cold War era, from soldiers such as Denis Sines we hear about their distressing stories.

Even after the war Sines was still fighting his posttraumatic emotional battle where he has an inability to even open up to even his own children and wife Brain Story.

Critical Thinking & Media Competence

While we know facts about posttraumatic disorder, the knowledge never registers in our minds unless there is some emotional importance of it to us. On the contrary, emotions can also have negative effects on our perceptions by clouding our minds and prevent us to use our other Ways of Knowing. They can make us focus too much or refuse some aspects of reality. In psychology, researcher's bias is a term describing the researcher's urge to obtain the wanted results.

  • To obtain such information they must have been interviewed to such length where coincidences were found;
  • Each individual has a unique system of emotional responses to a situation, whether that situation is in the past or in the moment.

Bouchard discovered that they both enjoyed purposely sneezing in elevators to frighten people in elevator. To obtain such information they must have been interviewed to such length where coincidences were found. In addition, Bouchard neglected the fact that they had met before The Minnesota Twins. Bouchard's emotions overwhelmed him with passion to the point of denying the possibility of coincidences, and this clouding of his perceptions may have led him to his acquisition of false knowledge.

Similarly, emotions hindering our perspectives can betray us when we learn something against our belief system. What if one day, like me, a kid who had believed in Santa Claus for 7 years caught their parents late at night placing presents under the Christmas tree From: Because of my emotional attachment to a childhood figure, I refused to believe that Santa was a fictional character.

My emotions halt the new knowledge that I have learnt because it destroyed a past knowledge of mine that had a great emotional significance to me. All in all, only to a certain extent can we rely on our emotions in the pursuit of knowledge. In times like finding our driving us towards the pursuit of knowledge of our passions and understanding emotional significance of information, we can definitely trust our emotions.

However, they may also control us to deny the knowledge that we are not content with and deceive us by letting us accept flawed knowledge.

  • Emotions may be a way of knowing, as they help us respond to certain situations;
  • Similarly, emotions hindering our perspectives can betray us when we learn something against our belief system;
  • Experiences attach emotions to knowledge through sentiments and relevance with the knowledge;
  • Furthermore, in the pursuit of knowledge, knowledge cannot be confirmed unless that person has experienced it;
  • In times like finding our driving us towards the pursuit of knowledge of our passions and understanding emotional significance of information, we can definitely trust our emotions.

In truth, our brains are very complex machines, and it is hard to know whether there is a distinction in importance between the use of reason and emotions in our lives to pursue knowledge. Works Cited Brain Story: In the Heat of the Moment - Part 1. Oxford University Press, n. Unknown, "The Minnesota Twins".

  • In times like finding our driving us towards the pursuit of knowledge of our passions and understanding emotional significance of information, we can definitely trust our emotions;
  • Bouchard discovered that they both enjoyed purposely sneezing in elevators to frighten people in elevator;
  • Each individual has a unique system of emotional responses to a situation, whether that situation is in the past or in the moment;
  • Emotions may be a way of knowing, as they help us respond to certain situations;
  • In another area of knowing, however, emotion can be the soul provider for the pursuit and gain of knowledge.