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Do you think computer crime is on the rise if so why

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  • These attacks could include things like raising or lowering the thermostat, shutting off or malfunctioning appliances like turning off the refrigerator or bypassing the temperature restriction on the water heater , causing wearables to overheat or making augmented reality glasses flicker bright blinding lights in your eyes;
  • My contacts and files may have been plundered and abused by the criminal then resold to other criminals via well-developed criminal online black markets;
  • Breaches often occur simply because an individual employee makes a mistake;
  • Hackers are also after state secrets, whilst a new form of insurrection — hacktivism - is becoming increasingly prominent against what they consider to be ethically-challenged corporations.

Rise Of The Cyber Criminals Whilst financial crime threats are growing, companies are still lagging behind when it comes security. Cybercrime is not restricted to a few fraudsters with a degree of computer literacy; neither is it mostly perpetrated by disorganised kids and increasingly it is not the work of individual criminals either. The average age of criminals is now 35.

Going high tech Think of these groups as small black-hat high-tech companies. They employ technology experts and are forever looking for ways to improve their attacks and to open up new avenues. As they become more sophisticated, they are increasingly turning their guns from vulnerable individuals to vulnerable businesses.

Here, the rewards are often likely to be greater - and security protocols are still surprisingly lax. This is one of the key reasons why the level of digital crime has jumped so remarkably. One in four companies admitted to have been hit by a cyber attack in the last two years. However, that number may soon be dwarfed. However, attackers are not always after money.

The worse is yet to come.

Hackers are also after state secrets, whilst a new form of insurrection — hacktivism - is becoming increasingly prominent against what they consider to be ethically-challenged corporations. A trend that arose in 2015 - and one which is continuing to grow significantly - is the onion-layered attack.

Criminals attack via multiple channels — whilst you might uncover one attack, another one will be going on in a different technical area, which you might not spot or be able to deal with because your resources are tied up fighting fire elsewhere. Addressing these challenges requires a high level of expertise - and plenty of resources.

Other common types of cybercrime include: In February, a hospital in California found itself locked out of its own IT system. These emails aim to trick the recipient into divulging passwords and other sensitive information. For example, they may masquerade as your bank, with a convincing query about your account.

Rise Of The Cyber Criminals

Just pop in your details, they say, and all can be sorted. These attacks have become more convincing as hackers become more sophisticated. Emails increasingly resemble the familiar branding of well-known companies, instilling a false sense of trust.

Embedded links take you to mirror websites, which to a busy executive or his PA look very much like the company they purport to be from. Whilst financial crime threats are growingcompanies are still lagging behind when it comes security, especially amongst small- to medium-sized businesses. Also, they might be put off by the cost of taking action, though any monies invested in IT security systems will be small in comparison with what they risk losing by doing nothing.

The Future of Crime: 8 Cyber-Crimes to Expect in Next 20 Years

Progress is, however, being made. However, the quality and sophistication of security varies from company to company, and from country to country. What this means is that, like hunters in the wild, criminals will gravitate towards the weakest and most vulnerable individuals and businesses around the globe.

There are things every business — large and small - ought to do as a matter of priority: Perform a risk assessment of your company. Identify any systems which are vulnerable. For example, is any of your data stored online? Ensure employees have their passwords deleted when they leave the company. Breaches often occur simply because an individual employee makes a mistake. Ensure that everyone is up-to-speed on the latest security protocols. Ensure data is regularly backed up.

Store back-ups in a remote location away from the office. Plan for the worst: Make an emergency contingency plan of what to do in the event of an attack.

Identify ways of ensuring your company is able to continue to operate, and that any losses are minimised. As new forms of cyber attack arrive, companies will develop tougher defences to repel them. In turn, cyber criminals will come up with ever more sophisticated tactics.

  • These attacks are not very common today, but expect them to become as widespread as email spam in the next five to 10 years;
  • As our lives become increasingly dependent on technology, we will become more vulnerable to cyber crime, in ways that may be hard to imagine today;
  • One in four companies admitted to have been hit by a cyber attack in the last two years.

As such, data security is an issue which needs to be continuously addressed. Your IT team should have a much more prominent position within the business with considerable senior management and board level representation, and top level CEOs need to play an increasingly active role in overseeing security processes - good governance always trickles down from the top.

Expert risk management firms should also be on hand to provide high quality advice and regular security assessments concerning the standards of your existing technology systems. The more you learn, and the more you monitor, the safer your company will be.