Homeworks academic service


The decision of daisy buchanan in the novel the great gatsby by f scott fitzgerald

The decision of daisy buchanan in the novel the great gatsby by f scott fitzgerald

It makes Daisy desirable and charming, and yet it ends up as one of the many damnable characteristics that literary critics focus on. It is easy to make Daisy the one automatically to blame for the unfortunate happenings in the novel, especially to protagonist Jay Gatsby, but that essentially cuts off her most interesting qualities.

It is, obviously, not the fault of Daisy for being perceived this way, but the fault of society and of the author himself. Zelda Fitzgerald, the wife of Francis Fitzgerald, was an artist in her own right.

There is no doubt that Fitzgerald cared for his wife, but as her work risked surpassing his own, he began discouraging and condemning her.

  • Trimalchio in West Egg" [47] but was eventually persuaded that the reference was too obscure and that people would not be able to pronounce it;
  • Tom demonstrates carelessness when he ignores Daisy at dinner time by talking to Myrtle, his mistress in New York;
  • Even though that was the emotion she may have felt at the time, it was foolish to tell this to Gatsby because Tom was present at that moment;
  • Tom is an imposing man of muscular build with a "husky tenor" voice and arrogant demeanor;
  • He is easy-going, occasionally sarcastic, and somewhat optimistic, although this latter quality fades as the novel progresses.

Chillingly, it can be concluded that while Fitzgerald benefited from their marriage and achieved literary success, the same was not true for Zelda, where their marriage was the main, and perhaps only, reason for her lack thereof.

The most disturbing aspect of their relationship was how Fitzgerald continued to use Zelda to write his own novels, despite her deteriorating mental state, and how he used her as a tool for his writing, such as her affair with his friend, which he arranged.

Fitzgerald likely did not see Zelda as her own person, and rather as a living clay model that he could manipulate into any mold he wished for.

  • In , Roger Pearson published the article "Gatsby;
  • For instance, one could argue that Daisy's ultimate decision to remain with her husband despite her feelings for Gatsby can be attributed to the status, security, and comfort that her marriage to Tom Buchanan provides;
  • To Gatsby, Daisy was merely a prize to be won, a trophy of his rise from nothing to luxury.

Protomastro 3 His use of Zelda as a muse for Daisy Buchanan, a character widely disliked and regarded to be unfavorable, personality-wise, in his novel The Great Gatsby, is the clearest exemplification of his sexism. It comes as no surprise that her frank sexuality, the wild abandon, impulsiveness with which she flaunted at parties, gave colour to his stories. At the birth of their daughter, Zelda said: This line is seen by critics to be one of the most resounding in the novel, and it is startling to find that it was not even his own.

  1. Historical context[ edit ] Set on the prosperous Long Island of , The Great Gatsby provides a critical social history of America during the Roaring Twenties within its fictional narrative.
  2. They look out of no face, but instead, from a pair of enormous yellow spectacles which pass over a non-existent nose. It is, obviously, not the fault of Daisy for being perceived this way, but the fault of society and of the author himself.
  3. Buchanan and Mitchell were both Chicagoans with an interest in polo. As the reader finds in the novel, many of Daisy's choices, ultimately culminating in the tragedy of the plot and misery for all those involved, can be at least partly attributed to her prescribed role as a "beautiful little fool" who is completely reliant on her husband for financial and societal security.

This goes to further the point that Fitzgerald, while praised for his writing and compelling characters, may not have ever had an original idea of his own, and instead entirely based his work off of his wife.

Daisy is condemned by critics for her lack of integrity. He makes Jay Gatsby the victim of the story, and in many ways he is, but Fitzgerald does it in such a way that forces culpability onto Daisy.

Navigation menu

While Daisy is a motif for the hollowness of the upper class, Gatsby is the pitied tragic hero. The two are similar enough from certain perspectives, but Gatsby is sympathized with while Daisy is not. He rose from poverty to riches through not entirely honest means, and fell like he was Icarus and he flew too close to the sun. His desire for wealth was greatly amplified by his relationship with Daisy when he was young; Gatsby saw Daisy as a representation of his greatest desire: To Gatsby, Daisy was merely a prize to be won, a trophy of his rise from nothing to luxury.

He claims to have fallen in love with her, and he may have, but in the beginning he had only wanted her because she was valuable to other men. He loved her because she represented his success and wealth. Fitzgerald depicts Daisy as the, morally, worse character of the Buchanan couple. This, and the interpretation of readers from this, has everything to do with her gender.

  1. He learns that the yellow car is Gatsby's, fatally shoots him, and then turns the gun on himself.
  2. Therefore, even though Tom showed carelessness through being inconsiderate of Daisy, Daisy was the more careless one because she was inconsiderate of more people as a result of her behaviour. They introduce Nick to Jordan Baker, an attractive, cynical young golfer.
  3. This, and the interpretation of readers from this, has everything to do with her gender.

She, similarly to Gatsby, desires wealth; unlike Gatsby, however, she had always been wealthy. Marrying Tom allowed her to keep her place in the upper class and do the things she most enjoyed.

Reflections on American literature, identity, and community for English 217

This superficial attitude, too, is rebuked by critics; they say Daisy willingly endured abuse to keep her position, and she might have. Tom Buchanan shows little regard over the women in his life other than keeping them to satisfy his own needs, and in this way he is similar to F. Daisy is, by far, not the best character in The Great Gatsby, but she is definitely not the worst.

The real reason for Daisy being the least liked character in The Great Gatsby, along with Myrtle Wilson and perhaps Jordan Baker, is the sexism of society. In this way, F.

Scott Fitzgerald sexist views are still prevalent and continue to influence modern readers to share his mindset of the dishonesty and inferiority of women. Daisy Buchanan is an interesting character in the novel; she is at once her own person and an object used to further the plots of others. Both of these are things she is criticized for, and somehow make her into the contradiction of a developed character that has no development of her own.

Chelsea House Publications, Scott Fitzgerald's Life and Output. Creative Collaborations in Literature, Art and Life.

  • At the moment, its author seems a bit bored and tired and cynical;
  • This proves that Daisy is extremely self-centered;
  • Like Gatsby, Fitzgerald was driven by his love for a woman who symbolized everything he wanted, even as she led him toward everything he despised;
  • Chillingly, it can be concluded that while Fitzgerald benefited from their marriage and achieved literary success, the same was not true for Zelda, where their marriage was the main, and perhaps only, reason for her lack thereof.