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The effects of exercise on pulse rate

Familiarise yourself with all procedures before starting. Sit down comfortably on a chair. Take 5 minutes to settle. If, at this point, you are using a pulse monitor, follow the manufacturer's instructions.

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Count the number of pulses per minute and record. Repeat twice and calculate the average number of pulses per minute and record.

  • The atrium becomes distended with blood, thus stimulating stretch receptors in its wall;
  • In the first year of life, the average heart rate is 120 160 bpm, and by the age of l2, it has usually fallen to 70 80 bpm;
  • It is highest in childhood and gets lower with age.

This is called the resting heart rate. Immediately measure your pulse rate and record. Walk gently for 5 minutes. Immediately measure the pulse rate and record. Walk briskly for 5 minutes. Run for 5 minutes. Compare the pulse rates after the different levels of exercise. Replicate the investigation or cross reference your results with other groups. A bar chart of the results should be drawn. The pulse on your wrist is called a radial pulse because you measure the pulse near a bone called the radius.

You can feel your radial pulse on either wrist, about an inch below your thumb. If you do not use a pulse monitor, it is usually not possible to measure your pulse rate accurately while participating in most activities.

  • The fitter you are, the quicker your heart rate will decrease after exercise;
  • Repeat twice and calculate the average number of pulses per minute and record;
  • This change in pH is detected by chemoreceptors in the walls of various blood vessels such as the aorta, carotid artery and vena cava;
  • You should feel an indented area;
  • To work out your maximal heart rate you need to do a simple calculation.

However, an estimate of your exercise pulse rate can be obtained if your pulse rate is measured immediately after exercising.

If you do not start counting within 10 seconds after stopping the exercise, the result is likely to be inaccurate. With the palm of one hand facing upwards, hold the index and middle fingers of the other hand together and press lightly on the pulse site as in the diagram.

You should feel an indented area. You may need to change the position of your fingers in order to feel your pulse really well. Do not count for a longer time because your heart rate begins to slow down as soon as you stop exercising. The fitter you are, the quicker your heart rate will decrease after exercise.

Count the number of breaths per minute and record. Repeat step 4 twice and calculate the average. This is the resting breathing rate. Immediately measure the breathing rate and record. Compare the breathing rates after the different levels of exercise.

It also depends on when it is measured and what you were doing immediately before measuring it.

Allowing for this, the heart rates listed are considered to be average. Adults have a heart rate of 60 90 bpm beats per minute while resting. In the first year of life, the average heart rate is 120 160 bpm, and by the age of l2, it has usually fallen to 70 80 bpm. A child's heart rate continues to fall as he or she reaches adulthood.

Investigation Into The Effect Of Exercise On Pulse Rate

Vigorous exercise accelerates heart rate in two ways: This change in pH is detected by chemoreceptors in the walls of various blood vessels such as the aorta, carotid artery and vena cava. Impulses are sent from these receptors to the cardiovascular centre of the medulla oblongata, which also possesses receptors. Impulses are sent from the medulla oblongata, through the sympathetic nervous system, to the sino-atrial node pacemaker where the production of noradrenaline by the accelerator nerve brings about an increase in heart rate.

The atrium becomes distended with blood, thus stimulating stretch receptors in its wall. The stretching of the heart wall makes the heart pump more blood into the circulation. The fastest heart rate that you can reach is known as the maximal heart rate. It is highest in childhood and gets lower with age. The maximal heart rate of a 20 year old when exercising is around 200 bpm, whereas a 60 year old has a maximal heart rate of around 160 bpm.

To work out your maximal heart rate you need to do a simple calculation. You subtract your age in years from 220 e. To ease yourself into and out of exercise, it is best to have substantial warm up and cool down sessions. A trained athlete's heart can pump more blood than average with each beat, therefore, his or her heart rate is slower.

  • Immediately measure the breathing rate and record;
  • To work out your maximal heart rate you need to do a simple calculation;
  • The time taken to return to resting heart rate is known as the heart recovery time;
  • Adults have a heart rate of 60 90 bpm beats per minute while resting;
  • Repeat step 4 twice and calculate the average.

Likewise, an athlete's recovery time is shorter. Similar to the heart, the lungs have two ways to increase oxygen intake in response to a changing demand during exercise.

One is to breathe more quickly respiratory rate and the other is to breathe more deeply volume. The thumb has its own pulse and may confuse your count. After running, the pulse is measured and recorded every minute until it returns to resting heart rate. The time taken to return to resting heart rate is known as the heart recovery time. Do keep in mind that it is difficult to accurately measure the effect of exercise on breathing as there is a certain degree of voluntary control involved.