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The need for higher standards in continued education in the united states

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With respect to geography, research on the teacher labor market in New York State Wyckoff et al. This provides strong evidence of the value for communities and schools to increase their effort to "grow" their own teachers through such efforts like Future Teachers of America. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects an average of 69,058 openings for elementary and secondary teachers annually, nationwide, from 2002 to 2012.

Over the coming decade, new school leaders will also be needed to replace retiring principals and superintendents. New York's public schools employed 4,108 school principals and 763 school superintendents in 2001-02. Almost 16 percent of the principals and 30 percent of the superintendents were nearing retirement. Since the Regents enacted their teaching policy in 1998, the Department continues to closely monitor the supply and demand of teachers.

  • Implementing the Common Core State Standards does not require data collection;
  • Last year, the program served 477 teacher candidates;
  • Myths About Content and Quality:

Over the past six years, the Regents have responded to shortage issues by enacting a number of new pathways, including: Supply of Teachers and Leaders As of the fall of 2004, 114 of New York's 268 colleges and universities prepare school personnel.

In 2001-02, the colleges recommended 15,541 new candidates for certification. In 2002-03, they recommended 16,333 candidates, a 5. However, candidates recommended by colleges made up only 69. The other 30 to 37 percent of the candidates applied directly to the Department to evaluate their credentials. The regulations authorizing individual evaluation will sunset in 2007 for childhood education certification and in 2009 for all other certification areas.

In several fields with teacher shortages, significantly higher proportions of candidates for certification apply individually to the Department through the transcript evaluation route to teacher certification. To encourage career changers and others to pursue careers in teaching, in 1999 and 2000 the Regents authorized teacher preparation institutions to register Alternative Teacher Preparation ATP programs.

Teacher preparation institutions offer ATP programs in partnership with local school districts. After a summer of introductory coursework, candidates receive Transitional Certificates and are placed in classrooms to teach under school district mentoring and college supervision.

By the end of their programs, the candidates must meet all requirements for initial teaching certificates. Statewide, 19 colleges and universities have registered ATP programs. Twelve of the 19 are in New York City. The number of ATP candidates beginning teaching grew from 385 in 2000-01 to 2,833 in 2003-04. Over the four years, ATP programs have enabled 6,321 candidates to become certified teachers.

Anecdotally, principals have reported high levels of satisfaction with teachers prepared by ATP programs. Agreement on the academic requirements of two- and four-year colleges through articulation agreements will contribute to the smooth transition of students seeking to become teachers. At this time, eight community colleges and five four-year colleges have registered such programs.

Adult Education

The sectors collaboratively addressed the obstacles students face when transferring to baccalaureate teacher education programs. The collaboration resulted in a generic template for development of teacher education programs providing a seamless curriculum leading to certification. Two- and four-year colleges may use the template to develop A.

A current research study Wyckoff, et. It hopes to learn 1 how attributes of different preparation pathways affect teacher retention and student recruitment; and 2 how pathways, such as traditional preparation, alternative preparation, and transcript evaluation, can be improved to meet New York City's teaching needs. The study runs through 2006; it may lead to recommendations for action by institutions or the Department. In the summer of 2005, the National Research Council will begin a major study of the quality of teacher preparation in the nation.

In response to a request from Congress, the study will look at: Entrants to teacher preparation programs, their prior preparation, and their educational backgrounds; The education received by teacher candidates and those who provide it; The extent of consistency between candidates' preparation in reading and mathematics instruction with the emerging scientific evidence about such instruction; and The data collection systems needed to provide information about the content knowledge, pedagogical confidence, and effectiveness of the graduates of both traditional and alternative teacher preparation programs.

The Department will follow the progress of this research and share its findings with the higher education community. The following describes planning elements that the four sectors, the Board of Regents and the Department will undertake to support the priority of An Adequate Supply of Qualified Teachers and School Leaders.

Continue to allocate cluster lines to hire outstanding faculty in teacher education. Expand programs to prepare future educators.

Myths About Content and Quality: General

CUNY will focus on expanding the number of educators prepared in shortage areas, including special education, mathematics, science, Spanish and bilingual education. Implement newly revised certificate programs for school leaders that will strengthen their preparation. Continue to collaborate with the New York City Department of Education on two alternative teacher preparation programs, the New York City Teaching Fellows and the Teaching Opportunity Program, that bring career changers and recent college graduates into teaching in New York City, especially in such shortage areas as mathematics, science, Spanish, bilingual education, and special education.

Streamline and strengthen recruitment and articulation into the senior colleges for students who begin their teacher preparation at the community college level. Develop new joint programs between community colleges and senior colleges focused on the preparation of teachers for shortage areas. Support and participate in the Pathways to Teaching study, which is examining the different routes into teaching in New York City.

CUNY will use results of the study to improve teacher education programs throughout the university. Independent Colleges and Universities The independent sector has 2,583 registered traditional teacher education programs at 85 institutions across the State; 11 of them also offer 101 Alternative Teacher Preparation programs, both downstate and upstate.

Independent colleges and universities have strong articulation agreements with two- and four-year institutions, outlining academic requirements necessary to assure programmatic transition in teacher education. New York's emphasis on strengthened liberal arts integration in teacher preparation programs has a strong effect on articulation agreements in the independent sector.

The independent sector will continue to develop and enhance its working partnerships with local school districts to recruit teacher candidates and to provide authentic and challenging field experiences for prospective teachers.

The independent sector offers professional development seminars and workshops for New York's teacher and administrative corps, including paraprofessionals. The independent sector will continue to develop innovative academic programs to prepare school librarians and media specialists, particularly in the schools operating in New York City.

  1. To help address this problem, the Department is creating an ongoing information network with the teacher preparation institutions, and the NYCDOE. The project, which is expected to be funded later this year, will be managed by the State University College at Buffalo; its second phase will be expanded to institutions with similar programs downstate.
  2. The master plan lists 46 new programs leading to certification of classroom teachers, school leaders, or pupil personnel service providers, including 19 programs leading to certification of mathematics and science teachers, which SUNY plans to introduce at 10 campuses between 2004 and 2008. The new information technologies are an important tool in this process, owing to their impact on the acquisition of knowledge and know-how.
  3. States and local school districts will drive implementation of the Common Core.
  4. Consideration should be given to making budgetary provisions for that purpose, and developing mutually beneficial agreements involving industry, national as well as international, in order to sustain co-operative activities and projects through appropriate incentives and funding in education, research and the development of high-level experts in these countries. This pipeline data will be provided to NYCDOE so it can target campuses for recruitment where needed personnel are being prepared.
  5. States and local school districts will drive implementation of the Common Core.

Independent sector institutions with teacher education programs will continue to work with the State Education Department and the New York City Department of Education to develop avenues to provide an adequate supply of teachers to New York City schools and will continue efforts to address teacher shortages in hard-to-staff disciplines around the State.

The independent sector's goals reach beyond developing an adequate supply of qualified teachers to contributing to build a new culture - one that values educators - through the continued commitment of time and resources to quality teacher education programs around the State.

Proprietary Colleges Only two proprietary institutions offer programs leading to teacher certification; a third is considering a move in that direction within the period of this Plan. A New Vision set the following goals: The initiatives which began through New Vision will continue. In addition, many of the initiatives proposed under Plans for Strengthening the Quality and Reputation of Academic Programs apply to teacher education programs equally with other programs of study.

The master plan lists 46 new programs leading to certification of classroom teachers, school leaders, or pupil personnel service providers, including 19 programs leading to certification of mathematics and science teachers, which SUNY plans to introduce at 10 campuses between 2004 and 2008.

The Department the need for higher standards in continued education in the united states already registered 44 of the programs. SUNY will also be considering the recommendations of the Provost's Mathematics Education Task Force for improving the preparation of teachers and the teachers of mathematics in the K-12 schools.

The Regents urge all institutions that prepare teachers to give the highest priority to expanding the number of well-prepared graduates of programs leading to certification in bilingual education, mathematics, the sciences, and special education.

The Regents encourage two- and four-year colleges and universities to embrace cooperative teacher education programs to eliminate duplication and ease student transfer, especially in the certification fields in which there are shortages of qualified teachers. They anticipate that these programs will provide earlier access to the teacher education pipeline for two-year college students. With an increased number of such programs, the higher education system will maximize its use of resources and increase the pool of qualified teachers.

Alternative Teacher Preparation ATP Programs During the period of this Plan, the Department will continue to support and evaluate existing ATP programs and seek to encourage the development of additional programs as sources of well-prepared teachers. To further encourage an increase in the number of persons interested in teaching careers, the Department will encourage establishment or revitalization of Future Teachers of America chapters at high schools in the State, encourage colleges to support their activities, and seek financial support for their efforts to increase the number of potential teacher education candidates.

Future Teachers of America To help increase the number of persons interested in teaching careers, the Department will encourage establishment or revitalization of Future Teachers of America chapters at high schools in the State, encourage colleges to support their activities, and seek financial support for their efforts to increase the number of potential teacher education candidates. Teachers of Tomorrow To increase teacher retention and effectiveness, the Department will seek to expand the Teachers of Tomorrow program to fund hard-to-staff school districts that develop partnerships with teacher preparation institutions to: Since its inception in 1987, 1,972 TOC participants have graduated from the the need for higher standards in continued education in the united states institutions' teacher preparation programs.

The Department plans to increase the number of students served annually to 1,900 by 2008 in order to increase the number of students from such groups earning baccalaureate and master's degrees and becoming teachers. Last year, the program served 477 teacher candidates. To help address this problem, the Department is creating an ongoing information network with the teacher preparation institutions, and the NYCDOE.

This pipeline data will be provided to NYCDOE so it can target campuses for recruitment where needed personnel are being prepared. This information will also allow the City and the State to better target financial resources to support the preparation of personnel in areas that are lagging. It provides technical assistance to institutions seeking to establish or update programs leading to certification in bilingual special education, bilingual school psychology, bilingual speech services, and English as a Second Language.

It surveys institutions annually to establish program enrollment and capacity figures to inform the Department on future training needs. The program provides tuition assistance to colleges and universities for candidates employed under modified temporary licenses and limited certificate categories working in bilingual special education and related service areas. Candidates nominated by school districts to join the BSE-ITI pursue a registered program leading to certification in the bilingual special education and related service categories.

Speech-Language Pathology Upstate Consortium The Consortium is designed to address the critical need for speech-language pathologists through a series of training and recruitment activities.

The project, which is expected to be funded later this year, will be managed by the State University College at Buffalo; its second phase will be expanded to institutions with similar programs downstate. An Orientation and Mobility Specialist program, which qualifies participants for national certification, was included under the ITI program in 2002.

Cooperation between Teacher Education Institutions and Public Schools Over the past four years, cooperation between colleges that prepare teachers and the districts that hire them has undergone a major improvement with the development of collaborative projects and professional development schools as a result of more rigorous Regents standards for teacher preparation programs.

The Regents urge the colleges and districts to continue to increase this collaboration in order to improve the preparation of teachers even further.

Myths vs. Facts

Best practices and technical assistance developed through this catalyst grant, including standards, promising practices, literature reviews, related links and resources, and tools to analyze and promote an institution's incorporation of technology into teaching and learning, are available on the Web at www. Video on Demand gives students and teachers access to over 20,000 video clips through the Internet.

  • Consideration should be given to making budgetary provisions for that purpose, and developing mutually beneficial agreements involving industry, national as well as international, in order to sustain co-operative activities and projects through appropriate incentives and funding in education, research and the development of high-level experts in these countries;
  • Higher education institutions must work in active partnership with parents, schools, students, socio-economic groups and communities.

Video clips are aligned to the State Learning Standards and accompanied by print materials, including teacher guides and student worksheets. Video on Demand is a valuable tool for teacher candidates as they learn to create lesson plans aligned to the Learning Standards. Meeting Teachers' Professional Development Needs The Regents urge colleges and universities that prepare school personnel to reach out to address the needs of teachers for professional development and renewal.

Initiatives promote inclusive education in high need schools and prepare future teachers as inclusive educators. Retention in the schools of graduates of current teacher and school leader preparation programs.

  1. Independent national bodies should be established and comparative standards of quality, recognized at international level, should be defined.
  2. The Department plans to increase the number of students served annually to 1,900 by 2008 in order to increase the number of students from such groups earning baccalaureate and master's degrees and becoming teachers.
  3. To overcome them remains an urgent priority in the renewal process for ensuring an equitable and non-discriminatory system of higher education based on the principle of merit. The means of assessing students and the use of the data that result from those assessments are up to the discretion of each state and are separate and unique from the Common Core.
  4. This was only made possible by many states working together.

Other pertinent findings of final reports of accreditation visits to programs preparing teachers and school leaders. Changes over time in pass rates on teacher certification exams, statewide. Changes over time in the number, statewide, of joint programs between two- and four-year institutions leading to certification.

  • Agreement on the academic requirements of two- and four-year colleges through articulation agreements will contribute to the smooth transition of students seeking to become teachers;
  • They should be involved, by means of adequate institutional structures, in the renewal of their level of education including curriculum and pedagogical reform , and policy decision, in the framework of existing institutional arrangements; l recognize that students have the right to organize themselves autonomously; m promote and facilitate national and international mobility of teaching staff and students as an essential part of the quality and relevance of higher education; n provide and ensure those conditions necessary for the exercise of academic freedom and institutional autonomy so as to allow institutions of higher education, as well as those individuals engaged in higher education and research, to fulfil their obligations to society;
  • The Declarations and Plans of Action adopted by them, each preserving its own specificity, are duly taken into account in the present Declaration - as is the whole process of reflection undertaken by the preparation of the World Conference - and are annexed to it;
  • Independent colleges and universities have strong articulation agreements with two- and four-year institutions, outlining academic requirements necessary to assure programmatic transition in teacher education.

Changes over time in the number, statewide, of two- and four-year programs articulated under the teacher education articulation template.

Certification rates of graduates of articulated two- and four-year teacher education template programs, statewide. Change over time in the graduation rates of alternative teacher preparation program students, statewide.

Provision of information about careers in school service to elementary and secondary pupils and their families.