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The popularity and negative impact of organ selling around the world

Should We Legalize the Organ Market?

But it's a miracle tragically out of reach for many thousands of people whose lives might be saved. There just aren't enough organs to go around.

  1. Proposals for such markets incorporate provisions aimed at ensuring the safety of sellers and recipients, for example, through thorough donor screening processes and proper postoperative care. A recent study found that kidney donors have only a slightly higher absolute risk of developing end-stage kidney disease than healthy non-donors.
  2. Whether we should adopt a regulated market in kidneys turns not only on moral argument, but also on whether doing so would actually increase supply.
  3. A recent study found that kidney donors have only a slightly higher absolute risk of developing end-stage kidney disease than healthy non-donors.

About 75,000 Americans are on the waiting list for kidney transplants. But in the coming year, just 18,000 will get them. That's only one in four.

It's not as though the others will eventually get kidneys if they just wait, sustained in the meantime by dialysis. In the next year, nearly 4,000 of those patients will die waiting. At least 1,200 others will fall off the list because they develop complications that make them too sick to withstand a transplant.

Should We Legalize the Market for Human Organs?

Thousands more transplant candidates might be saved if more Americans signed organ donation cards, if more families consented to donation of their loved ones' organs, and if medical personnel approached the families of potential donors more often. But the supply of cadaveric organs has been disappointingly flat.

So in recent years, there's been a push to persuade living Samaritans — relatives, friends and even strangers — to donate one of their kidneys. That's helped, but not enough. The situation has sparked recent debate about what was once unthinkable — paying people to donate organs. Six experts recently tackled that emotional issue in an Oxford-style debate, the last of this season's events in the Intelligence Squared U.

Before the debate, 29 percent were uncertain. Afterward, that declined to 9 percent.

Those who favored buying and selling organs went from 44 percent to 60 percent. But those opposed inched up only 4 points, from 27 to 31 percent.

  • The existence of such a market might harm poor people;
  • According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 10,000 black market operations involving purchased human kidneys now take place per year;
  • Locations of kidney transplants for Malaysian patients Fig;
  • The existence of such a market might harm poor people;
  • In the United States, the wait list for kidneys alone is around 100,000;
  • A recent study found that kidney donors have only a slightly higher absolute risk of developing end-stage kidney disease than healthy non-donors.

Here are some highlights: It's past time to face the fact that altruism is just not enough. Many people need more of an incentive to give.

And that's why we need to be able to compensate people who are willing to give a kidney to a stranger, to save a life. We are not talking about a classic commercial free-for-all, or a free market, or an eBay system.

We're talking about a third-party payer. For example, today you could decide to give a kidney. You'd be called a Good Samaritan donor.