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The relation of george orwells nineteen eighty four to todays government

He realises that language has the power in politics to mask the truth and mislead the public, and he wishes to increase public awareness of this power. He accomplishes this by placing a great focus on Newspeak and the media in his novel Nineteen Eighty-Four. Demonstrating the repeated abuse of language by the government and by the media in his novel, Orwell shows how language can be used politically to deceive and manipulate people, leading to a society in which the people unquestioningly obey their government and mindlessly accept all propaganda as reality.

Language becomes a mind-control tool, with the ultimate goal being the destruction of will and imagination. When God destroys the Towel of Babel, the civilizations which have contributed to the construction of the Tower suffer ever-after from the Curse of Confusion. Certainly, the ultimate aim of Newspeak is to enclose people in an orthodox pseudo-reality and isolate them from the real world.

Whereas people generally strive to expand their lexicon, the government in Nineteen Eighty-Four actually aims to cut back the Newspeak vocabulary. This can be done, psychologists theorise, because the words that are available for the purpose of communicating thought tend to influence the way people think.

So when words that describe a particular thought are completely absent from a language, that thought becomes more difficult to think of and communicate. It is therefore ideal for a totalitarian system, in which the government has to rely on a passive public which lacks independent thought and which has a great tolerance for mistakes, both past and present. Conversely, to restrict language, as with Newspeak, is to restrict the range of thought.

  1. It oversees rationing of food , supplies , and goods. A critical study of the writings of George Orwell.
  2. Minitrue is the ministry of propaganda. Instead of forcing the public to use Newspeak by law, the Party ensures that the public is immersed in the new language.
  3. Chilton identifies the specific features of Newspeak that help restrict thought. It was merely the substitution of one piece of nonsense for another.

Chilton identifies the specific features of Newspeak that help restrict thought: Such narrowed public thought is what the Inner Party prefers, because a public that lacks the ability to think vividly poses less of a threat than one that can readily criticise the government and defend itself from harm.

Winston, like the majority of the public, suffers when he is robbed of his words and thoughts. Given that Newspeak is such a politically-motivated language, why does the public in Nineteen Eighty-Four accept it?

After all, the Party is undertaking a project of monumental proportions: The Party is able to achieve this by again employing psychological tactics. Instead of forcing the public to use Newspeak by law, the Party ensures that the public is immersed in the new language. Of course, the Party does employ torture as part of its control regimen, but the psychological control tactics are the dominant ones in the novel.

However, while Newspeak is a very significant method of mind control through language, it is just a part of a greater Inner Party scheme. It is, in fact, the Party-controlled media in the novel that expertly uses Newspeak as well as other linguistic trickery to spread its propaganda and brainwash the public. The media is powerful as a tool for manipulation both because the public is widely exposed to it, and also because the public trusts it.

When the telescreens initiate the Two Minutes Hate, for instance, the people are roused to a frenzy: The Party is interested in masking the truth, and so the media manipulates language to present a distorted reality. In the novel, these lies are quite obvious.

  • So when words that describe a particular thought are completely absent from a language, that thought becomes more difficult to think of and communicate;
  • As upside down as is, the world we live in is not too far off;
  • In the real world today, political correctness and euphemism are both pervasive and pervasively derided;
  • By using only language that carries neutral or positive connotations to talk about anything related to war, the media successfully soothes an otherwise resentful public;
  • Such narrowed public thought is what the Inner Party prefers, because a public that lacks the ability to think vividly poses less of a threat than one that can readily criticise the government and defend itself from harm.

For example, the media controlled by the Party, of course continually refers to the Ministries of Truth, Peace, Love, and Plenty. In reality, however, the Ministry of Truth is concerned with the falsification of records, and the Ministry of Peace deals with warfare. The Ministry of Plenty makes up economic figures to convince the public that the economy is in good shape, even though there are great shortages of all commodities due to the war.

Although the irony in the titles is blatantly obvious, Orwell is making a point about how the media can use language to mask the truth. If the public were dissatisfied, they would resent the shortage of food and other commodities and possibly rebel against the Party. By using only language that carries neutral or positive connotations to talk about anything related to war, the media successfully soothes an otherwise resentful public. Similar reports follow throughout the entire novel, constantly celebrating the capture of enemies and the conquering of new territories, but never admitting any kind of defeat.

In many ways, the media is relying on the principle that a piece of information that is repeated often enough becomes accepted as truth. Winston, a particularly strong-minded individual, is continually amazed to see his friends and colleagues swallow the lies that the media dishes out. This brainwashing is done through the words of the telescreens, newspapers and magazines.

After all, language is the link to history. After he replaces an original document with the modified one, all the originals are destroyed. Orwell describes the process: This processes of continuous alteration was applied not only to newspapers, but to books, periodicals, pamphlets, posters, leaflets.

Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. In this way every prediction made by the Party could be shown by documentary evidence to have been correct; nor was any item of news, or any expression of opinion, which conflicted with the needs of the moment, ever allowed to remain on record. Orwell shows us evidence that the relation of george orwells nineteen eighty four to todays government tactic is working: It is either Eurasia or Eastasia, but Winston is not sure because the Party keeps changing history.

As well as altering the past by manipulating written language, the Party has an ingenious plan to break the link with the real past by introducing a language barrier. Thus, the manipulation of language and text not only effects the present, but also the past and future in more than one way.

4 Predictions From Orwell’s '1984' That Are Coming True Today

Indeed, politicians have used written language to manipulate history both in the past and present. Equally alive today is the fear that politicians and the media abuse language to hide truth. Orwell gives examples of how politicians can twist words to deceive people in his essay Politics and the English Language: Millions of peasants are robbed of their farms and sent trudging along the roads with no more than they can carry: Even more disturbing, in the twenty-first century we have now a rapidly growing, major industry based solely upon the manipulation of language and thought: Works Cited Chilton, Paul.

Orwellian Language and the Media. Lewis, Florence and Peter Moss. Aubrey, Crispin and Paul Chilton, eds. Comedia Publishing Group, 1983. Orwell and the politics of despair: A critical study of the writings of George Orwell.

  • Chilton identifies the specific features of Newspeak that help restrict thought;
  • This creates a gullible and dependent society.

Cambridge University Press, 1988. Freeman and Company, 1983.