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The risks of beowulf to save the danes

Beowulf has to fight this evil fiend.

  • Far in the distance their ships shall descry it, and they shall call it Beowulf's mound;
  • It isn't enough that Beowulf is willing to risk his life to fight Grendel and save the Danes, but he also has to defend himself against the court official's attempt to discredit Beowulf;
  • So should a good thane ever do!
  • Returning Hrunting to Hunferd, he praised the sword, saying nothing of its failure in the fight.

No doubt, the reader sympathizes with Beowulf for he will have to fight this monster. After hearing the details of Grendel's awful attacks, anyone would be afraid to encounter Grendel: The soldiers realized they. A terrible monster haunts the halls of Herot. In Beowulf, the reader is encouraged to sympathize with Beowulf. Beowulf has to fight a horrendous monster. His life is endangered. Beowulf has to attempt what no other warrior has been able to do--to kill Grendel: Grendel haunts the hall by night for twelve years.

The Danes despair of ridding themselves of him.

  1. Sorrowful sat the comrades of Beowulf, waiting and hoping against hope for his reappearance.
  2. Close around the mere hung the woods, shrouding the water, which, horrible sight, was each night covered with fire. The den was filled with rings of gold, cups, banners, jewels, dishes, and the arms of the old owner of the treasure.
  3. Loud was Hrothgar's wailing when at morning Beowulf came forth from his bower. When Hrothgar and his men saw the mere red and boiling with blood they deemed that Beowulf was dead, and departed to their citadel.
  4. When Higelac died and Hardred was slain, Beowulf succeeded to the throne, and for fifty years ruled the people gloriously.
  5. Sweet was the minstrel's song, and the warriors were happy in Heorot.

They can neither defeat him nor come to terms with him. Grendel has been spreading havoc on the people for years. Beowulf is expected to face serious consequences by fighting Grendel. Grendel is a terrible monster whom no one has been able to defeat.

The reader sympathizes with Beowulf due to the severity of his task. Grendel is a monster who is killing the people.

Grendel has been terrorizing the people for twelve years. This has gone on long enough.

How is sympathy encouraged for Beowulf in the epic poem?

Although Beowulf has put his own life in danger, he is not supported by all the court officials. The reader again sympathizes with Beowulf because a certain court official tries to discredit Beowulf: Unferth, an official of the court, attempts to discredit Beowulf with the story of a swimming match Beowulf had as a boy with another boy, Breca. It isn't enough that Beowulf is willing to risk his life to fight Grendel and save the Danes, but he also has to defend himself against the court official's attempt to discredit Beowulf.

Of course, Beowulf shares his side of the story and convinces the King to allow him to fight Grendel: Beowulf exonerates himself with his version of the swimming match. Ultimately, Beowulf fights Grendel and defeats him. Beowulf also defeats Grendel's mother.

  1. Close around the mere hung the woods, shrouding the water, which, horrible sight, was each night covered with fire.
  2. Wikipedia Commanding the men who had accompanied him to remain upon the hillside, leaving him to combat with the dragon alone, Beowulf went proudly forward, shouting his battle-cry. When the mead-hall had been cleansed and refitted, they gathered therein and listened to the song of the bard who told how Healfdene's knight, Hnaef, smote Finn.
  3. Sweet was the minstrel's song, and the warriors were happy in Heorot.

Although the reader initially sympathizes with Beowulf, Beowulf is triumphant and the reader is delighted to share in his victorious defeat of the monsters. Lastly, the reader sympathizes with Beowulf at the end of Beowulf's life.

The risks of beowulf to save the danes

Beowulf has led a solitary life with no family with whom to share his possessions: There is no wife, no child, no kinsman, no friend to do so. Beowulf led a successful life as far as his victories and the 50 years of his rule, but he led a solitary life, apparently not by choice since he mentions ruefully several times that he has neither son nor heir to whom he can leave his possessions.

In the end, Beowulf dies. He is defeated by a dragon. The reader is saddened and sympathizes with Beowulf at his death. The people of his kingdom are equally saddened by his death: While Beowulf died as he chose, Wiglaf questions if this was a wise decision.