Homeworks academic service


The true motives of the spanish explorers

Spanish Exploration and Settlement in the Southeast in the first two centuries of Spanish colonization in the New World, the Chesapeake Bay red X was on the edge - far from the focus of Spanish settlements that stretched from Mexico into South America Source: Library of Congress, Americae sive qvartae orbis partis nova et exactissima descriptio Diego Gutierrez, 1562 The Spanish were the first Europeans to explore and to establish a settlement in what today is Virginia.

Despite occasional claims by boosters of tourism, the English settlements in Virginia 1607 and Massachusetts 1620 are over 80 years too late to be the first colony started by Europeans on the North American continent, and roughly 40 years too late to be called the first colony started by Europeans in Virginia.

The Spanish considered Virginia to be part of Florida. Since Virginia was originally the northern part of Florida, the first European name for Virginia was based on the Spanish term for Easter. Seven decades later, a rival group of Europeans gave the region the the true motives of the spanish explorers Virginia to honor their Queen Elizabeth, the "virgin queen.

Ponce de Leon made the first major effort to establish a permanent settlement in North America in 1521. In the 1560's, Spanish officials sent a military expedition inland that explored southwestern Virginia, and in 1570 Jesuit priests tried to establish a settlement on the York River. The English did not arrive at Roanoke Island for the first time until 1584.

By the time investors in London started a settlement at Jamestown in 1607, the Spanish had been exploring, conquering, enslaving, converting, and settling at different places in the New World for over a century.

Spanish exploration of the New World was concentrated in the Carribean initially because wind patterns made it easier to sail to latitudes far to the south of Virginia - but Spanish fleets returning to Europe used westerly winds that brought ships past Florida, exposing them to attacks from any pirate base located along the coastline of North America Source: Augustine, founded in 1565 after the French tried to create two colonies on the southeastern coastline.

Pirates had no "political cover" but could keep all the loot. Library of Congress, Americae sive qvartae orbis partis nova et exactissima descriptio Diego Gutierrez, 1562 The Spanish were not the first Europeans to reach North America. About 1,000 years ago, five centuries before Columbus sailed to the Caribbean in 1492, the Vikings built simple fishing camps in Newfoundland and Labrador.

The Spanish started permanent colonies in the Caribbean, and Santo Domingo founded 1496 remains the oldest continuously-occupied colonial settlement in the New World.

The Spanish were not alone in trying to explore and settle the New World. There was competition from other European states, but initially they avoided the Caribbean because of the Spanish presence there.

During the 1500's, English and French explorers looking for fishing grounds determined the outlines of the North American coast north of New England. The sailors constructed temporary camps on Newfoundland when fishing off the coast.

Those camps remained as isolated, single-purpose communities, occupied only during the time when cod were being caught and dried for transport back to Europe.

The true motives of the spanish explorers

In 1541-3, the French tried to establish a permanent settlement on the St. That failed, but the French returned in 1603 to start again at St. Croix Island and Nova Scotia. In the six decades between those efforts, the French sought twice to build colonies on the southeastern coast of North America.

The settlement at Charlesfort 1562 collapsed before the Spanish had an opportunity to attack it. The Spanish destroyed the later French colony at Fort Caroline 1565and then Spanish soldiers executed Jean Ribault and nearly all of of his shipwrecked colonists in a massacre on a Florida beach. After that experience, France avoided conflict with Spain by settling much further north of St. Croix and then Quebec, the French left an unoccupied zone on the eastern edge of the continent.

The English, Dutch, and Swedes focused their North American colonization efforts in that gap between the French and Spanish, but only after the military power of Spain was diminished by the failure of its sleet the Spanish Armada to conquer England in 1588.

The Spanish were aggressive in protecting their claims to the New World, but did not have the resources to colonize the entire North American coastline. Lack of available soldiers prevented Spain from challenging all the European competitors occupying "northern Florida," and even Caribbean islands were left with few Spanish settlers.

Spanish occupiers came to America immediately after completing their 700-year reconquest of the Iberian Peninsula. The extension of the reconquista to North Africa was blocked when local tribes in Morocco were able to defend their territories and culture, including the Muslim faith. They conquered Ceuta and set up forts on the West African coast, seeking a path to the Spice Islands.

The true motives of the spanish explorers

After rounding the tip of Africa, trade with India and Asia occupied the Portuguese. They were the first European nation to bypass the land routes controlled by Muslims, by going around the Cape of Good Hope to open shipping routes to the Spice Islands.

The Portuguese lacked the population and military capacity to occupy the territories they "discovered" in Africa. They also found the trade in gold and slaves from Africa, and spices from East Asia, so rewarding that journeys across the Atlantic Ocean were a low priority.

Brazil was not settled in the mid-1500's. The Spanish did establish tiny enclaves in North Africa such as Melilla, but soon redirected their expansion towards North America. Spanish monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella supported Columbus's initial journey west, opening a new route across the Atlantic Ocean, because towards the east the Muslims already controlled the land route and the Portuguese already controlled the sea route.

Hiring an Italian to sail west into the unknown offered the best opportunity for Spain to get access to the spices, without paying high costs to deal with rivals. In contrast to the colonization pattern of the English, the Spanish rarely sent a fleet of ships loaded with colonists directly from Spain to North America.

  1. Cuba is colonised by the Spanish 1555. Those diseases can spread to other people, but would not trigger pandemics that would depopulate the region.
  2. They were defeated near St. The Spanish started permanent colonies in the Caribbean, and Santo Domingo founded 1496 remains the oldest continuously-occupied colonial settlement in the New World.
  3. From 1539 to 1543, starting in Florida with over 600 men, 200 horses, 300 pigs, and a pack of attack dogs, the expedition meandered for thousands of miles through the interior.

Augustine, limiting the extent of the Spanish province of Florida Source: Library of Congress, La Floride by Nocholas Sanson, 1657 Ponce de Leon made the first attempt to create a permanent colony in North America after Columbus's discovery, eight years after he led the first major European exploration of the North American continent into Florida in 1513. He returned in 1521 with 200 people to start a settlement near modern-day Tampa.

The local Calusa tribe successfully resisted his attempt to occupy their territory. Ponce de Leon abandoned the 1521 colonization project and returned to Cuba, where he died from an arrow wound suffered in Florida. Europeans brought new technology to North America, but needed food from Native Americans to survive initially Source: Augustine, a full-scale and permanently-occupied town in North America.

After various ships mapped the edge of the continent from the Caribbean to Newfoundland, Spain sent expeditions that explored inland from the Florida and Carolina coast to the Mississippi River and Mexico.

That same year, Captain Pedro de Quejo mapped the coastline from Florida to Delaware, sailing along the Virginia shore on that trip but capturing no slaves.

  • What effect does leadership have on the expeditions?
  • President James Monroe issued a statement in 1823, since known as the Monroe Doctrine, to deter Spain or other European nations from interfering with the independence of the new nations;
  • Christopher Columbus landed in Venezuela 1502;
  • Spanish and english colonization compare and contrast the spanish and english motives for colonization 2008, june 30 in writeworkcom retrieved 19;
  • The three g's i am hernando cortes, and i am an explorer who sailed in hopes of finding gold, which was one of the three main motivations for exploration what;
  • By the time investors in London started a settlement at Jamestown in 1607, the Spanish had been exploring, conquering, enslaving, converting, and settling at different places in the New World for over a century.

He took a South Carolina native later named Francisco de Chicora back to Spain in 1521, and Chicora spun tall tales about mineral wealth in the New World and succeeded in getting a trip back home. Ayllon's first attempt at settlement involved a six-ship expedition with 600 people. It left from Hispaniola in 1526, including his captive Native American.

  • Failing to subdue the Indians, Coronado responded brutally, laying a winter-long siege to a town, burning resisters at the stake, enslaving hundreds, and driving many Indians to suicide as did de Soto;
  • The resupply ships and the land party failed to link up on the coast, leaving the expedition on its own;
  • Failing to subdue the Indians, Coronado responded brutally, laying a winter-long siege to a town, burning resisters at the stake, enslaving hundreds, and driving many Indians to suicide as did de Soto;
  • Columbus sails on his fourth and last voyage to the New World Honduras and Panama 1502;
  • The role of spanish discovery and colonization in the history of the united states of the spanish explorers encountered three major civilizations in the new;
  • Spanish expedition under Francisco Hernandez de Cordoba 1475-1526 lands on the Yucatan coast in Mexico 1519:

It was too late to plant crops, and the local inhabitants were not friendly. After just three months, the survivors returned to Hispanola and San Miguel de Guadelupe was a failure.

They landed at the site of modern Tampa and spent the winter at Apalachee modern Tallahasseebefore traveling west along the Gulf Coast. The resupply ships and the land party failed to link up on the coast, leaving the expedition on its own. Eight years later in 1536, the only four people to survive the trip including Cabeza de Vaca and a black slave known as Estaban reached Mexico City. It traveled inland from Tampa.

Finding Juan Ortiz, a survivor of Narvaez expedition, provided de Soto a translator and guide. Hernando de Soto's group went much deeper into the interior of today's southeastern United States, and came close to the modern-day boundaries of Virginia.

In 1540, his explorers camped at the Native American town of Xuala near what is now the town of Morganton, North Carolina. The Spanish then turned west and headed towards Mexico. Library of Congress, Carte de la Louisiane et du cours du Mississipi 1718 The impact of the Spanish as they travelled through Native American communities must have been dramatic. Local leaders and their followers were seized and forced to obey de Soto's commands, including serving as guides and bearers of Spanish supplies.

The Spanish had swords, armor, guns, the true motives of the spanish explorers, large mastif dogs trained to maim people, and sufficient military capacity to go wherever they desired. Those who had been leaders lost status, since they clearly lacked the power to protect their followers.

After the Spanish moved on to dominate another Native American community, those left behind who had survived the visit must have struggled to rebuild their society. After the disruption of de Soto, old assumptions of authority and obligation may have been replaced by new alliances and allegiances.

The political and religious patterns discovered by later English colonists may have been created over just the last three generations. The Native American cultures disrupted by the English fur traders and settlers during the 1600's and 1700's may have existed since the mid-1500's.

The first Europeans to penetrate the interior of the Carolinas the true motives of the spanish explorers not peace-loving, sensitive men. The behavior of the Spanish reflected their cultural assumptions of being "better" than the Native Americans, carrying their Catholic faith into the interior of the continent.

It is unlikely that the Native Americans, forced to provide food for the Spanish and to carry their supplies, welcomed their visitors as suggested in one book about North Carolina history: He reported the area to be pleasant and spent a month resting his horses and enjoying the hospitality of the natives.

Hernando de Soto's expedition brought Spanish goods into Native American communities, and some items must have been traded through the Piedmont into Virginia. The soldiers probably brought diseases as well, such as influenza and malaria. Those diseases can spread to other people, but would not trigger pandemics that would depopulate the region.

The damage done by those diseases would have been limited to just a small number of Native Americans living near the path of the exploration party. The Spanish men who made it to Xuala had already lived though the stage of smallpox when they could have infected others, and de Soto's expedition may not have brought pandemic-causing diseases.

The soldiers were adults who had survived the killer infections, and could no longer transmit them. If the Spanish had not already brought depopulating diseases, the English did. Pandemics during the English colonization period killed most of the people within Native American towns. The true motives of the spanish explorers drastic decline of population in the Carolina Piedmont and Tennessee River watershed triggered reorganization of Native American communities, leading to formation of the Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw, and other tribes.

The depopulation reduced the opportunity to capture slaves locally. The difficulty of enslaving Native Americans led Carolinians to increase imports of black slaves from Africa. For the first six decades of the 1500's, France, England, and the Netherlands lacked the capacity to create colonies in the New World. The pressure for Spain to occupy North America was minimal. The Spaniards focused on pillaging the native tribes in Mexico and South America of their gold and silver, sending shiploads of looted wealth back across the Atlantic Ocean.

Portugal chose to focus on Brazil and the African slave trade, after dividing its claims to the New World with Spain under the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494. However, European rivals were able to capture Spanish ships carrying New World wealth back home even when the nations were not officially at war. To support the intercept-the-Spanish-treasure-fleet efforts, those European nations did consider establishing bases in North America.

  1. The spanish empire in the xix century, some spanish explorers and missionaries would crossed this zone, as manuel de iradier in 1848. This time, the effort was partly an attempt to create a refuge for Protestant Huguenots fleeing religious persecution in France.
  2. Permission was not granted to exerpt the 1992 translation in verse.
  3. Those camps remained as isolated, single-purpose communities, occupied only during the time when cod were being caught and dried for transport back to Europe.
  4. The boundaries of the territory were not clear, including where the French control ended east of New Orleans and Spanish Florida began.

The Spanish recognized the threat, but did not have a large enough population in the Western Hemisphere to plant settlements everywhere. Expanding to the north and planting settlements in "Florida" was a low priority. The Spanish did not try to build bases in the latitude of Virginia, far north along the Atlantic coast from the Caribbean, for two reasons: Some sort of base would enhance the legitimacy of the Spanish legal claims, pre-empting other European nations from asserting that they had discovered and occupied vacant land with no Christian presence.