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The ways in which the beatles nwa and tupac shakur changed the music industry

Music Industry Confession

But then again, our entire global history is rife with real conspiracies, not just theories. Wax Poetics, along with many other good people in the music and publishing industry, received this email today from an anonymous source claiming to be a former insider. We have chosen to post this for our audience to read, but we neither support nor argue against the claims of Mr.

  • George Clinton , with his two groups Parliament and Funkadelic , took the sound to another galaxy;
  • Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us.

I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. The industry was different back then. The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles.

I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. Speaking to those I knew, we joked about the theme of the meeting as many of us did not care for rap music and failed to see the purpose of being invited to a private gathering to discuss its future.

Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting. Needless to say, this intrigued and in some cases disturbed many of us. The agreement was only a page long but very clear on the matter and consequences which stated that violating the terms would result in job termination.

A few people refused to sign and walked out. No one stopped them. I was tempted to follow but curiosity got the best of me. Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues who shall remain nameless like everyone else thanked us for attending.

He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed. At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering.

The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement. He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments.

I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion.

Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates.

The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. Most of us were taken back by this. Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions.

He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. Immediately, silence came over the room. You could have heard a pin drop. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside.

  • Only one man could bring them together;
  • Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented;
  • Immediately, silence came over the room;
  • Most of us were taken back by this;
  • Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us.

My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting.

Remember you signed an agreement. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off. A million things were going through my mind as I drove away and I eventually decided to pull over and park on a side street in order to collect my thoughts.

I replayed everything in my mind repeatedly and it all seemed very surreal to me. I was angry with myself for not having taken a more active role in questioning what had been presented to us. After what seemed like an eternity, I was able to calm myself enough to make it home.

The next day back at the office, I was visibly out of it but blamed it on being under the weather.

30 Times Black Music Changed the World

No one else in my department had been invited to the meeting and I felt a sense of guilt for not being able to share what I had witnessed. I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free.

There were no answers and no one to talk to. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months. Eventually, it was as if the meeting had never taken place. It all seemed surreal. I became more reclusive and stopped going to any industry events unless professionally obligated to do so.

On two occasions, I found myself attending the same function as my former colleague. Both times, our eyes met but nothing more was exchanged.

As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. I was never a fan of it but even I could tell the difference. Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves.

Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts and most companies when more than happy to capitalize on it. Each one was churning out their very own gangster rap acts on an assembly line. Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music.

I spoke to a few of my peers in the industry to get their opinions on the new trend but was told repeatedly that it was all about supply and demand.

Sadly many of them even expressed that the music reinforced their prejudice of minorities. I officially quit the music business in 1993 but my heart had already left months before.

I broke ties with the majority of my peers and removed myself from this thing I had once loved. As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, fearful of sharing it with the wrong person but also a little ashamed of not having had the balls to blow the whistle.

But as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible.

Please help me spread the word.

  • Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music;
  • Raised in a home dedicated to black nationalism, Shakur also had deep artistic training, studying theater at Baltimore School for the Arts;
  • Please help me spread the word;
  • I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free;
  • Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice;
  • I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration.

Hopefully, others who attended the meeting back in 1991 will be inspired by this and tell their own stories. Most importantly, if only one life has been touched by my story, I pray it makes the weight of my guilt a little more tolerable.