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Writing a letter to a judge after sentencing

In many cases, a defense attorney will encourage his or her client to write their judge before sentencing to humanize a defendant.

What you are telling the court about, or asking for

Judges receive many of these such letters. So many, in fact, that they can lose their potency with the Court. Every defendant is a person.

They have families, friends, and often children of their own.

Writing to Your Sentencing Judge

Putting a vulnerable, human face to the name a sentencing judge sees is a good thing. When do These Letters Hurt? However, take for instance a convicted drug lord who is purported to have been responsible for the murders of hundreds of people.

  1. When do These Letters Hurt?
  2. He could receive a 23-year sentence.
  3. Apologies and expressions of remorse go much further than trying to look like the victim. Expressing remorse for your sins is good.

He wrote such a letter to his judge pleading for mercy. Here is an excerpt from that article: The writer was Christopher M. He led a trafficking ring from an armed stronghold in Kingston, moving guns and drugs between Jamaica and the United States, prosecutors said, and his soldiers patrolled the streets and guarded stash houses. He ordered murders, shootings and beatings, and, when one man stole drugs, the prosecutors said, Mr.

  • He could receive a 23-year sentence;
  • The writer was Christopher M;
  • This could have no effect on his next sentence pronouncement, or it could make his decision even harsher;
  • Coke killed him with a chain saw.

Coke killed him with a chain saw. Coke was arrested and sent to Manhattan, where he has since pleaded guilty to conspiracy charges. He could receive a 23-year sentence.

  • Every defendant is a person;
  • Many judges want to see remorse and guilt;
  • A well written letter to the sentencing judge taking responsibility for the actions a defendant has already plead guilty to or been convicted of can go a long way.

And it was in that context that Mr. Coke, 42, took it upon himself to send a polite letter to the judge, Robert P. Coke said he accepted responsibility for his actions, although he did not apologize in the letter.

Coke offered a list of 13 reasons, with some broken into subcategories.

  • Many judges want to see remorse and guilt;
  • Coke never apologies for his actions which lead to his conviction;
  • This could have no effect on his next sentence pronouncement, or it could make his decision even harsher.

For one thing, he said, he had lost his mother recently. Coke tells his woeful tale of how his sentence will effect him. However, because of his perceived evil deeds, the next time his sentencing judge receives a similar letter, he may only remember the last time he read one. This could have no effect on his next sentence pronouncement, or it could make his decision even harsher. Many judges want to see remorse and guilt.

LawAccess NSW

A well written letter to the sentencing judge taking responsibility for the actions a defendant has already plead guilty to or been convicted of can go a long way. Apologies and expressions of remorse go much further than trying to look like the victim. As seen in the letter written above, Mr. Coke never apologies for his actions which lead to his conviction.

This omission could mean the difference between leniency from the court and a harsher sentence. Time will tell in this case, but take heed when writing a letter to a sentencing judge. Painting yourself as a victim is bad.

  1. Coke never apologies for his actions which lead to his conviction.
  2. Coke, 42, took it upon himself to send a polite letter to the judge, Robert P. So many, in fact, that they can lose their potency with the Court.
  3. Coke never apologies for his actions which lead to his conviction.
  4. Expressing remorse for your sins is good. He led a trafficking ring from an armed stronghold in Kingston, moving guns and drugs between Jamaica and the United States, prosecutors said, and his soldiers patrolled the streets and guarded stash houses.
  5. The writer was Christopher M.

Expressing remorse for your sins is good.