Homeworks academic service


Blue against white by jeannette c armstrong essay

Armstrong, we realize just this. Armstrong writes about the character, Lena, a Native woman who has recently moved off the reservation into a city.

See, that’s what the app is perfect for.

After moving away, with a new life filled with new experiences and opportunity, Lena comes back to visit her family in her quaint childhood home on the Native reservation. By doing so, Lena discovers how her childhood shaped and sheltered her character today by recollecting all the simple memories of her past.

Even simple scenes in the story, like the flying crow, the barking of a distant coyote, or the colour of her front door, recalled her past, and after reflecting on them, she realizes who she is today. With these events, Lena also realizes what she longs for most: When Lena spots the crow flying above the road ahead of her, the sight of it moves her to tears. This crow, a character in her childhood stories, is now the a creature who brings on a flock of memories Lena recollects on, which results in self-discovery.

  1. After all, what makes us stand out against society is what keeps us from becoming society.
  2. Just like the crow, she discovers the need to return to her true home every so often. Today, though completely unjust, a stigma still exists, which Lena reflects upon, and discovers more about her longing for home and her sheltered childhood, free from stereotypes and neglect.
  3. It holds inside of it the all of the stories, customs, traditions, legends, and memories of her childhood.

For a crow only stays north for the warm, safe, summer months, them must leave with the changing of the seasons. Her childhood, her summer, is over, and she has to find her life elsewhere. However, she finds this is difficult, unlike the crow, which effortlessly flies away.

  1. Today, though completely unjust, a stigma still exists, which Lena reflects upon, and discovers more about her longing for home and her sheltered childhood, free from stereotypes and neglect.
  2. Through the crow, the coyote, and the blue door did she realize how much she missed her home, and how different and lonely it was in the city.
  3. For by standing out against the crowd, you have your own memories, your own stories, which are held dear to your heart.
  4. This self-discovery also leads her to appreciate how much her home means to her, and it is not just a shabby house with paint peeling off the walls and weeds growing in the yard. However, she finds this is difficult, unlike the crow, which effortlessly flies away.

Just like the crow, she discovers the need to return to her true home every so often. Not only that, but a crow is also a symbol death. This coming of age is discovered through the crow, and leads Lena to realize how powerful her roots are valued and embedded in her persona.

Through the crow, these Native roots, traditions, and stories are just one of the memories, which Lena finally realizes, shaped her character into what it is today. This sound then brings on another wave of self-discovery, as Lena compares they coyote living in the wild around her reservation, and a coyote that lived in the city.

This sound brings on a stark contrast of the freedom of her old home, of her childhood, against her new home in the city with societies grasp tightly around it.

Blog Archive

Not only that, but it also symbolizes how First Nation people are stereotypically viewed in modern society. Today, though completely unjust, a stigma still exists, which Lena reflects upon, and discovers more about her longing for home and her sheltered childhood, free from stereotypes and neglect. This brings on a third round of self-discover, as she remembers how this door sheltered her, and made her unique. In the reservation, she would have been free from judging by society.

This is the door that gave shelter from the world outside and kept in love and compassion.

“Blue Against White” by Jeannette C. Armstrong Essay

The door, though simple and menial, holds much more value to Lena. It holds inside of it the all of the stories, customs, traditions, legends, and memories of her childhood. By Lena longing to revisit and relive these mementos, this door called her back to her home.

This door helps Lena discover how important her home is to herself. It stands out clearly against all the rest, as Lena would in the city, which she discovers is not a bad thing. For by standing out against the crowd, you have your own memories, your own stories, which are held dear to your heart.

There is no need to assimilate into society. After all, what makes us stand out against society is what keeps us from becoming society. Upon recollecting on her childhood, Lena has discovered how sheltered and innocent she was from the harshness of the real world outside her door. It is also what she longs to return to most.

Who can edit:

Through the crow, the coyote, and the blue door did she realize how much she missed her home, and how different and lonely it was in the city. This self-discovery also leads her to appreciate how much her home means to her, and it is not just a shabby house with paint peeling off the walls and weeds growing in the yard. The good, innocent memories which shaped our character into what we are today blurred out anything that was harmful or unpleasant.

Maybe we all still long for it as well. This longing for home is what motivates Lena up the hill, and back to her home.