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Confederate day essay gettysburg leadership three union

Additional Information In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Stewart Papers," "and it consists of four brief documents, two of which are so fragmentary as to be practically useless " xii.

Elliott devotes but one chapter sixteen pages to Stewart's family, education, and antebellum career, and but two plus a short conclusion total: More than four-fifths of the text deals with Stewart's years in Rebel military service. Even here, however, scarcity of source material compels Elliott to fill most of his pages with general descriptions of campaigns and battles.

  1. The fate of the Union Army, at that moment, rested on the shoulders of 1,350 men of the 83rd Pennsylvania, 44th New York, 16th Michigan and 20th Maine regiments.
  2. If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'. Three Days at Gettysburg consists of thirteen essays, written by some of the conflict's finest historians, on the performances on the ranking officers in both armies during the July 1863 battle.
  3. Union regiments pulled from one area of Cemetery Hill to plug a gap created by the retreat created their own gap, and Confederate infantry poured through.

We learn almost nothing about Stewart's participation in these engagements. Steward often all but disappears for pages. He did not direct any independent operations and played no significant role in the formulation of strategy.

He even managed to avoid becoming seriously entangled in the sordid internal politics of the Army of Tennessee. These problems raise serious questions about the raison d'etre for this book. While Elliott's accounts ofthe battles are competently done, they, in fact, tell us nothing that is not readily available in studies of the individual engagements. We are better off for having had Elliott make the effort to ferret out information on Stewart, but I wonder if a long article in the Tennessee Historical Quarterly might have served as well as this book does, so far as an account of Stewart's role in the Confederacy is concerned.

Essays on Confederate and Union Leadership. Edited by Gary W.

  • His men fought tenaciously, and Reynolds was shot dead during the fighting;
  • Casualties at Gettysburg totaled 23,049 for the Union 3,155 dead, 14,529 wounded, 5,365 missing;
  • I'm certainly not in agreement with all arguments raised, but I did start thinking about some of the received wisdom about the battle.

Kent State University Press, 1999. Three Days at Gettysburg consists of thirteen essays, written by some of the conflict's finest historians, on the performances on the ranking officers in both armies during the July 1863 battle.

The editor and publisher have combined nine previously published essays on the first two days' battle with four new essays on the climatic July 3 actions.

Battle Of Gettysburg

Undoubtedly, many readers have copies of the two earlier works, but incorporating all these essays under one cover is a good idea. The topics range from two essays on Robert E.

Lee and one on George G. Caldwell's Union division in the Wheatfield on July 2. Additional essays examine the conduct of James Longstreet, Oliver O. Howard, Henry Slocum, and Henry Hunt. All ofthe essays are marked by recent scholarship and good writing. Some of the historians' conclusions are as controversial as the battle itself.

As a whole, however, the essays offer interpretations that are balanced, if not incisive. Krick's extremely harsh analysis of the First Corps commander's performance on July 2. The four new essays are welcome additions to the previous studies.

Sauers renders a fair and overdue assessment of George Meade's generalship on the final day. In contrast to Krick's essay on "Old Pete," Carol Reardon examines how soldiers in the First Corps, notably Pickett's Virginians, defended their commander's performance during the postwar years. Carmichael, biographer ofWilliam Pegram, writes an excellent essay on why the Confederate artillery cannonade failed on July 3, and who was to blame.

Kross, a licensed battlefield guide at Gettysburg, counterbalances Carmichaers study with a portrait of Union artillery commander Henry J. Hunt and his conduct of the Federal batteries on the third day.

  • My favorites were probably the ones that go most counter to common thought on the battle;
  • For an hour they struggled across rough ground while Union batteries threw shot and shell among them, but when they got far enough up the slopes, the Federals could not depress their barrels enough to fire into them, and the Rebels routed infantry of the XI Corps;
  • Still, even though I am not convinced, the essay did cause me to rethink some of my own view;
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  • More than four-fifths of the text deals with Stewart's years in Rebel military service;
  • The Army of the Potomac did not pursue, for which Meade would be soundly criticized.

Gallagher provides a fine introduction to the volume and a perceptive essay on Lee's decision to renew the offensive on July 2. Other contributors include A.

  • No explanation for this is given in either book, although the latter book is not solely about leadership issues;
  • Army were usually lower.

Scott Hartwig on Caldwel's Second Corps division. Seven essays cover Confederate subjects, and six examine Union subjects. If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

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