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Essay on the immortal soul by plato

Hume on the immortality of the soul PHIL 20208 Jeff Speaks November 30, 2006 In this short essay, Hume considers and rejects, in three successive sections, three types of arguments for life after death.

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He reiterates this skepticism about arguments which attempt to show that the fact that human beings think or feel implies that they have immaterial and immortal souls: Are their souls also immaterial and immortal?

He argues, first, that even if persons are immaterial substances, this should give us no reason to believe in immortality; and, second, that the kind of immortality which would be guaranteed us, if this argument succeeded, would not be worth wanting. She employs it as a kind of paste or clay; modifies it into a variety of forms and existences; dissolves after a time each modification, and from its substance erects a new form.

  1. Visible things are changing; invisible things remain in the same state always.
  2. Plato uses his theory that learning is recollection to show that the soul pre-exists the body.
  3. She employs it as a kind of paste or clay; modifies it into a variety of forms and existences; dissolves after a time each modification, and from its substance erects a new form.
  4. Plato also ties in causality and the difference in being and becoming 97 b. If this were true, than a blind and deaf man would be able to recognize the forms, as he had no senses to get in the souls way.
  5. Whereas The Beautiful is invisible and can only be known by the mind. The weakness of the body and that of the mind in infancy are exactly proportioned; their vigour in manhood, their sympathetic disorder in sickness, their common gradual decay in old age.

How would a dualist like Plato respond? Hume presents a further argument against the view that immortality of persons is guaranteed by the incorruptibility of the soul: The soul, therefore, if immortal, existed before our birth: And if the former existence nowise concerned us, neither will the latter.

Philosophy/Plato: The Soul and The Theory of Forms term paper 1478

In how many instances would this reasoning fail us with regard to the present world. Punishment, according to out conception, should bear some proportion to the offence.

Why then eternal punishment for the temporary offenses of so frail a creature as man?

  • A man is alive because it has a soul;
  • If learning really is recollection, than the soul would have to have life before it became one with the body;
  • However, it is this point that I refute;
  • Christians who think of life after death as a decision of God are in this respect different from Platonists who regard the immortality of the soul as guaranteed by its nature;
  • Death is the separation of the body and the soul;
  • Yet the particular items that portray the Forms are composites and vary over time.

He gives four arguments of this form, which argue that some feature or other of human life does not fit well with the view that we were designed by a just God for life after death: People are for the most part concerned only with this life: What cruelty, what iniquity, what injustice in nature, to confine thus all our concern, as well as all our knowledge, to the present life, if there be another scene still waiting us, of infinitely greater consequence?

Ought this barbarous deceit to be ascribed to a beneficent and wise being? Too many people die young for this life to be a preparation for another: The half of mankind die before they are rational creatures. This makes our fear of death inexplicable: She may give us a horror against an unavoidable event, provided our endeavors, as in the present case, may often remove it to some distance.

How convincing are Platos arguments for the immortality of the soul in the Phaedo?

Christians who think of life after death as a decision of God are in this respect different from Platonists who regard the immortality of the soul as guaranteed by its nature. Their domestic life requires no higher faculties either of mind or body.

This circumstance vanishes, and becomes absolutely insignificant on the religious theory: The one sex has an equal task to perform with the other: Their powers of reason and resolution ought to have been equal.

The first is based on a kind of argument from analogy: The weakness of the body and that of the mind in infancy are exactly proportioned; their vigour in manhood, their sympathetic disorder in sickness, their common gradual decay in old age.

Plato Questions - Concept of the Soul

The step further seems unavoidable; their common dissolution in death. Trees perish in the water, fishes in the air, animals in the earth.

  • Ought this barbarous deceit to be ascribed to a beneficent and wise being?
  • A blind man still cannot truly know the forms.

What reason then to imagine, that an immense alteration, such as is made on the soul by the dissolution of its body, and all its organs of thought and sensation, can be effected without the dissolution of the whole?