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As a young, impressionable person, I used to lament the fact that I was not given "the gift" of belief, as it seemed to come with confidence in the bel "Why I Am Not A Christian? As a young, impressionable person, I used to lament the fact that I was not given "the gift" of belief, as it seemed to come with confidence in the believer's "goodness". Who doesn't want to be good?

  • Moral behaviour is completely independent from supernatural belief;
  • Once I had read Russell, I could embrace my sense that the evil force god, the killer of anything that opposes him that appears in the Bible does not exist, and should not exist it would be horrible!
  • Russell followed me when I moved into the field of education, and today, almost a century after he wrote his essay, I would like people to read out loud his words against groupthink and crimestop newspeak for protective stupidity;
  • Who doesn't want to feel sure about themselves?
  • I should wish to see a world in which education aimed at mental freedom rather than imprisoning the minds of the young in rigid armor of dogma calculated to protect them through life against the shafts of impartial evidence.

Who doesn't want to feel sure about themselves? Who doesn't want to have a superior guideline to stick to?

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As much as I wanted to believe in the religion that happened to be the predominant one in my environment, it all just seemed ridiculous. I remember sitting in a church as a 15-year-old, praying to a god I did not believe in to give me faith in him.

It took me many years to get over the feeling of guilt over my "lack" or "misfortune". I felt left out by the non-existent god in a society that apparently unquestioningly accepted what didn't make sense to me.

I said over and over again to believers who reprimanded me for my atheism: I admire the morality of Christianity and wish I could be part of it! Then I left my small town and moved to a university city, and started reading, reading, and reading.

Philosophy, literary fiction, history, art history, religion, pedagogy. In the huge pile: And finally, finally, I was able to break away from the Lutheran guilt trap that catches believers and nonbelievers alike in the social environment where it is dominant. Finally I could distance myself from the unthinking group pressure of "Christian morality".

There is no such thing. Religion is not moral.

Atheists are not likelier to kill or rape or steal than Christians, despite the fact that they do not feel the threat of eternal punishment. Moral behaviour is completely independent from supernatural belief. Russell helped me get the definitions straight.

  1. Recommended to the world. Some works indicate that some societies with lower religiosity have lower crime rates—especially violent crime, compared to some societies with higher religiosity.
  2. I felt left out by the non-existent god in a society that apparently unquestioningly accepted what didn't make sense to me. Who doesn't want to feel sure about themselves?
  3. There is no such thing.

Once I had read Russell, I could embrace my sense that the evil force god, the killer of anything that opposes him that appears in the Bible does not exist, and should not exist it would be horrible! I learned that I was not alone in seeing that religion is a human invention to simulate immortality - for those who are afraid to let go of their egos when they die - and to enforce patriarchal power structures - for those who can't convince people to follow them by choice and free will.

It is a way for people to define themselves through exclusion and protectionism, not through individual merit. Russell followed me when I moved into the field of education, and today, almost a century after he wrote his essay, I would like people to read out loud his words against groupthink and crimestop newspeak for protective stupidity: I should wish to see a world in which education aimed at mental freedom rather than imprisoning the minds of the young in rigid armor of dogma calculated to protect them through life against the shafts of impartial evidence.

I don't other essays on religion and related subjects in the myth. Why do I not want to be a Christian?

Morality and religion

It supports evil practices and holds people hostage in an ancient worldview. It discriminates and divides and takes advantage of weaknesses to spread power.

  • Who doesn't want to be good?
  • Reposted in support of the victims of grand scale child abuse, covered up and ignored by the Catholic Church for too long to be bearable;
  • As a young, impressionable person, I used to lament the fact that I was not given "the gift" of belief, as it seemed to come with confidence in the bel "Why I Am Not A Christian?
  • Why do I not want to be a Christian?
  • Who doesn't want to feel sure about themselves?
  • In the huge pile:

It stimulates fear in order to control. It plays Big Brother and forces people to love him. Recommended to the world. Reposted in support of the victims of grand scale child abuse, covered up and ignored by the Catholic Church for too long to be bearable.

  1. In the huge pile. Even for people who were nonreligious, those who said they attended religious services in the past week exhibited more generous behaviors.
  2. Finally I could distance myself from the unthinking group pressure of "Christian morality". In the huge pile.
  3. Peer ratings can be biased by stereotypes, and indications of a persons group affiliation are sufficient to bias reporting.
  4. Russell followed me when I moved into the field of education, and today, almost a century after he wrote his essay, I would like people to read out loud his words against groupthink and crimestop newspeak for protective stupidity. I remember sitting in a church as a 15-year-old, praying to a god I did not believe in to give me faith in him.
  5. I admire the morality of Christianity and wish I could be part of it! For modern Westerners, who have been raised on ideals of universality and egalitarianism, this relativity of values and obligations is the aspect of Hinduism most difficult to understand.

Reposted in support of those who suffer discrimination at the hands of "evangelical" preachers of hate and division and intolerance. Reposted in support of those who feel the grip of their churches tightening in fear of the modern world of freedom of choice.