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Should nuclear energy be used to produce electricity essay

Electricity demand is increasing twice as fast as overall energy use and is likely to rise by more than two-thirds to 2040.

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Almost all reports on future energy supply from major organisations suggest an increasing role for nuclear power as an environmentally benign way of producing reliable electricity on a large scale. Growth in the world's population and economy, coupled with rapid urbanisation, will result in a substantial increase in energy demand over the coming years.

  • Primary energy and electricity outlook There are many outlooks for primary energy and electricity published each year, many of which are summarised below;
  • The challenge of meeting rapidly growing energy demand, whilst reducing harmful emissions of greenhouse gases, is very significant and proving challenging.

The United Nations UN estimates that the world's population will grow from 7. The challenge of meeting rapidly growing energy demand, whilst reducing harmful emissions of greenhouse gases, is very significant and proving challenging.

In 2016 global atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide rose by 0. Electricity demand growth has outpaced growth in final energy demand for many years. Increased electrification of end-uses — such as transport, space cooling, large appliances, ICT, and others — are key contributors to rising electricity demand.

The number of people without access to electricity has fallen substantially; in 2016, the EIA estimates 1. Aside from the challenges of meeting increasing demand and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, cleaner air is a vital need. Studies have repeatedly shown that nuclear energy is a low-emitting source of electricity production in general. It is also specifically low-carbon; emitting among the lowest amount of carbon dioxide equivalent per unit of energy produced when considering total life-cycle emissions.

Primary energy and electricity outlook There are many outlooks for primary energy and electricity published each year, many of which are summarised below. The report's 'Current Policies Scenario' considers only policies firmly enacted at the time of writing, whilst the 'New Policies Scenario' — the central scenario — incorporates policies firmly enacted as well as an assessment of the results likely to stem from announced policy intentions.

  • Outside the tubes in the steam generator, non-radioactive water or clean water boils and eventually turns to steam;
  • Electricity demand growth has outpaced growth in final energy demand for many years.

In each recent WEO report, a third scenario is included that starts with a vision of how and over what timeframe the energy sector needs to change — primarily to decarbonise — and works back to the present. There are many changes ahead in the sources of primary energy used. As the use of electricity grows significantly, the primary energy sources used to generate it are changing.

Advantages of Nuclear Energy

In both scenarios generation from all low-carbon sources of electricity is required to grow substantially. It is especially suitable for meeting large-scale, continuous electricity demand where reliability and predictability are vital — hence ideally matched to increasing urbanisation worldwide.

It outlined measures to achieve this, including moves to reduce the cost of building new nuclear capacity and creating a level playing field that would allow all low-carbon generation technologies to compete on their merits. Without that contribution, the cost of achieving deep decarbonisation targets increases significantly," the study finds. The MIT study is designed to serve as a balanced, fact-based, and analysis-driven guide for stakeholders involved in nuclear energy, notably governments.

With high carbon constraints, the system cost of electricity without nuclear power is twice as high in the USA and four times as high in China according to the MIT study.

Also clear across successive reports is the growing role that nuclear power will play in meeting global energy needs, while achieving security of supply and minimising carbon dioxide and air pollutant emissions.

The report recommended a series of measures including increasing energy efficiency, reducing the use of inefficient coal-fired power plants, increasing investment in renewables, reducing methane emissions, and phasing out fossil fuels subsidies.

Nuclear Energy: Essay on Nuclear Energy (548 Words)

Half of the additional emissions reductions in its 450 Scenario come from decarbonisation efforts in power supply, driven by high carbon price incentives. The IEA acknowledges that nuclear power is the second-biggest source of low-carbon electricity worldwide after hydropower and that the use of nuclear energy has avoided the release of 56 billion tonnes of CO2 since 1971, equivalent to almost two years of global emissions at current rates.

Most of the new nuclear plants are expected to be built in countries with price-regulated markets or where government-owned entities build, own, and operate the plants, or where governments act to facilitate private investment. The 450 Scenario gives a cost-effective transition to limiting global warming assuming an effective international agreement in 2015, and this brings about a more than doubling of nuclear capacity to 862 GWe in 2040, while energy-related CO2 emissions peak before 2020 and then decline.

In this scenario, almost all new generating capacity built after 2030 needs to be low-carbon.

For countries that import energy, it can reduce their dependence on foreign supplies and limit their exposure to fuel price movements in international markets. CO2 emissions from gas grow strongly to 2040.

Ten countries account for almost three-quarters of the world total for fossil-fuel subsidies, five of them in Middle East notably Iran and Saudi Arabia or North Africa where much electricity is generated from oil, and where nuclear power plants and renewables would be competitive, but for those subsidies. Its effect would be to "increase import bills, heighten energy security concerns and make it harder and more expensive to combat climate change.

Innovative transportation technologies are gaining momentum and are projected to increase electricity demand. Achieving this long-term deployment level will require construction rates for new nuclear capacity of 23 GWe per year on average between 2017 and 2060.