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Why is aquatic therapy better than land therapy essay

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To determine whether aquatic therapy in combination with land-based therapy improves patient outcomes after hip or knee arthroplasty compared with land-based therapy alone. Controlled trials published in English in a peer-reviewed journal that compared aquatic therapy in combination with land-based therapy with land-based therapy alone were included; trial quality was assessed using the PEDro scale.

Three small trials of moderate quality were included in the qualitative analysis. The results for improved functional outcomes were not considered clinically significant. It is not possible to draw confident conclusions from this review because of the small number of studies of limited quality and the modest differences found.

Further studies of sound methodological quality are required to confirm the results.

  1. For the purposes of this review, aquatic therapy refers to any water-based therapy, including stretching, strengthening, ROM, and aerobic exercise. Very warm and sweat inducing.
  2. Evaluation of the full text of these 14 trials yielded a consensus to retain 3 trials 13 — 15 for inclusion in the systematic review.
  3. Economic analysis alongside randomized controlled trials is needed to examine the cost-effectiveness of these clinical outcomes. Exercise is the fountain of youth that everyone wants to drink.

Economic analysis alongside randomized controlled trials is needed to examine the cost-effectiveness of these clinical outcomes. In Canada, 47,137 hospitalisations for hip arthroplasties and 57,718 hospitalisations for knee arthroplasties occurred in the 2012—2013 fiscal year, 1 representing a 16.

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Studies comparing aquatic therapy with land-based therapy after hip or knee arthroplasty have demonstrated significant improvements in outcomes from both types of therapy, 2627 but whether adding aquatic therapy to land-based therapy results in even better patient outcomes is not known. This is an important clinical question, given the additional costs associated with providing aquatic therapy.

Our primary aim in this review, therefore, was to investigate the effectiveness of aquatic therapy in combination with land-based therapy compared with land-based therapy only.

Our specific objectives were to investigate whether aquatic therapy in combination with land-based therapy resulted in more reduction in impairment, activity limitations, and participation restrictions in patients after hip or knee replacement relative to land-based therapy alone.

With this information, readers can clearly assess the strengths and weaknesses of a review and determine the usefulness and clinical applicability of findings.

In addition to our database searches, we tracked citations of the included articles using Google Scholar and manually searched the reference lists of the included articles. Two reviewers independently screened each item by title and abstract, using predetermined criteria; any disagreements were resolved by discussion until a consensus was reached, and we calculated agreement between reviewers as to which trials fulfilled the selection criteria using a kappa coefficient.

When we could not include or exclude an article on the basis of its title and abstract, we retrieved a full-text copy and reapplied the selection criteria. Eligibility criteria Studies were eligible for inclusion if they met the following criteria: For the purposes of this review, aquatic therapy refers to any water-based therapy, including stretching, strengthening, ROM, and aerobic exercise.

Data extraction We developed a data extraction form that we used to extract data on the study participants e. We obtained full-text copies for all the included studies. Data extraction was completed by one reviewer and checked for accuracy by a second reviewer. In the case of any discrepancies, we referred back to the published article.

Aquatic Therapy vs Land Therapy

Quality assessment of trials and risk of bias Two researchers independently applied the PEDro scale to rate the methodological quality of the included trials. The 11 items are eligibility criteria, random allocation, concealed allocation, baseline comparability, blinding of subjects, blinding of therapists, blinding of assessors, adequate follow-up, intention-to-treat analysis, between-group comparisons, and point estimates and variability.

Water Therapy vs. Land Therapy: What You Need to Know

A trial with a score of 6 or more is considered to be of high quality. Disagreement between the reviewers was resolved through discussion to reach a consensus. SMD values of less than 0. Our meta-analysis used a random effects model and RevMan software Version 5.

  1. The therapeutic advantages of water, such as buoyancy, thermal conductivity, and resistance can help you reach your therapy goals. Our Physical Therapists and Physical Therapist Assistants are in the water with the patients to instruct, stretch, massage and demonstrate to each patient as needed to reach individual goals.
  2. Supporters who donate will receive a CKPT bracelet to recognize their contribution.
  3. No limitations based on age, body size, sex, or health-related limitations. Controlled trials published in English in a peer-reviewed journal that compared aquatic therapy in combination with land-based therapy with land-based therapy alone were included; trial quality was assessed using the PEDro scale.
  4. Another bonus to aquatics therapy is that basically all of the same exercises that can be performed on land can be done in the water. Quality assessment of trials and risk of bias Two researchers independently applied the PEDro scale to rate the methodological quality of the included trials.

We combined data in a meta-analysis in which a minimum of two trials were clinically homogeneous. Trials were considered clinically homogeneous with each other if a common population, intervention, and outcome measure was used. We examined the data from the meta-analyses for clinical significance by comparing the mean difference with data available from the literature on minimal clinically important difference MCID.

If no data on MCID were available, we substituted half the standard deviation of the control group at baseline, which is accepted as representing the MCID.

This approach considers RCTs to be of high quality or at low risk of bias; the quality level is then downgraded to moderate, and again to low or very low, if limitations are present. In the case of our study, a one-level downgrade e.

  • In addition to our database searches, we tracked citations of the included articles using Google Scholar and manually searched the reference lists of the included articles;
  • Very warm and sweat inducing.

The reasons for downgrading the evidence in each meta-analysis are provided below. Results Study selection Our initial database search yielded 420 articles; reference scanning and citation tracking identified no additional articles. After removal of duplicates, we screened titles and abstracts for 298 studies. We then retrieved full-text copies of 14 studies for further analysis.

Evaluation of the full text of these 14 trials yielded a consensus to retain 3 trials 13 — 15 for inclusion in the systematic review. Of these 3 trials, we included 2 1315 in the meta-analysis; the 3rd was excluded because the aquatic therapy group was not allocated randomly 14 see Figure 1.