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A description of a short summary of animal farm by george orwell

Jones, the neglectful owner of the farm, has drunkenly shut the animals away and gone to sleep, the animals all assemble in the barn to hear a respected boar named Old Major speak. Old Major proceeds to share his dream of a world without men, one ruled by animals. He points out that all of the suffering endured by the animals is the result of man.

Jones forces the animals to work too hard and then steals the products of their labor. Furthermore, the animals all know that Mr. Jones does not value their lives and will mercilessly slaughter each and every one of them once they have outlived their usefulness. Old Major tells the animals that their lives would be much better if they could overthrow man and find freedom.

Animal Farm Summary

He cautions them, however, that if they should ever overthrow their human masters, they must take precautions against acting like humans themselves and should remember to treat all animals as equals. Three days later, Old Major dies and the animals begin to prepare for the rebellion. The preparations are led by the pigs, who are the cleverest animals on the farm. Two pigs in particular—Snowball and Napoleon—take on leadership roles and are aided by Squealer, an extremely persuasive pig.

The rebellion comes sooner than expected when Mr. Jones forgets to feed the animals and then attacks them when he sees them helping themselves. Incensed, the animals drive Mr.

  1. They serve only Napoleon, and kill anyone who is against him. By the end of the story, all the commandments have been erased apart from "All animals are equal", which has been changed to "All Animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.
  2. They decide the farm will now be ruled only by animals, calling the system "animalism". He lies, twists the truth and takes advantage of the animals' bad memories.
  3. Old Major creates his rules for animals. In 1936 and 1937, Orwell fought in the Spanish Civil War.
  4. Building the windmill is grueling work, and the animals are given fewer and fewer rations.
  5. Farmer Jones finds them and whips them but the animals fight back.

Jones and his men off the farm and take over, changing the name to Animal Farm. The pigs paint the principles of Animalism on the barn wall. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend. No animal shall wear clothes. No animal shall sleep in a bed. No animal shall drink alcohol. No animal shall kill any other animal.

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All animals are equal. The animals are eager to prove themselves a success and complete the harvest more quickly and efficiently than their former human master could ever have done. Most of the animals believe strongly in Animalism and work very hard to do their part for the farm. However, there are troubling indicators that not all the animals are being treated equally.

The pigs, being the cleverest of the animals, quickly become the permanent leaders of the farm. Despite the fact that they supervise the farm work instead of performing any labor themselves, the pigs begin claiming extra rations in the form of milk and apples.

This seemingly unequal treatment is easily explained away by Squealer, who warns the animals that Mr. Jones might return if the pigs are not given what they need to run the farm successfully. Jones really does return in an effort to recapture the farm. A power struggle begins to emerge between Snowball and Napoleon, who disagree on nearly everything.

While Snowball is an enthusiastic and persuasive orator, Napoleon is better at gaining support behind the scenes. Snowball tries to engage the animals by organizing them into committees and teaching them to read, while Napoleon focuses on the education of the youth, taking nine newborn puppies up to a loft to be personally educated by himself. Napoleon argues that the animals will starve if they neglect their farming to focus on a windmill.

  1. The animals are very keen about the idea.
  2. Napoleon starts working with human beings outside, even though this used to be forbidden.
  3. Building the windmill is grueling work, and the animals are given fewer and fewer rations.
  4. When Napoleon takes over, he decides to build the windmill. Snowball tries to engage the animals by organizing them into committees and teaching them to read, while Napoleon focuses on the education of the youth, taking nine newborn puppies up to a loft to be personally educated by himself.
  5. Three days later, Old Major dies and the animals begin to prepare for the rebellion.

Just before the vote, however, Napoleon gives a signal and nine ferocious dogs the now grown-up puppies attack Snowball and chase him off the farm. Napoleon addresses the shocked animals and announces that the Sunday meetings are abolished. Farm policy will now be decided by a committee of pigs, over whom he will preside. In an about-face, Napoleon soon announces that they will begin construction on the windmill.

After Napoleon takes power, the quality of life on the farm begins to deteriorate. Building the windmill is grueling work, and the animals are given fewer and fewer rations.

When Napoleon announces that he will begin conducting business with the neighboring human farms, the animals are uneasy, but they are convinced by Squealer that there was never an actual rule against trade. The pigs lead a smear campaign against Snowball, who they claim was a criminal working to secretly undermine the farm.

  • They sleep in a bed in the farmhouse;
  • They say they all that stuff for their "brains;
  • Napoleon changes his mind and decides to build a windmill, pretending that it was his idea all along.

The animals begin the difficult work of rebuilding the windmill, though they are now nearly starving. The hens begin a small rebellion when Napoleon tries to sell their eggs, but they are soon defeated. In the spring, Napoleon calls a meeting in which multiple animals come forward and publicly confess to various crimes.

Pilkington to drive up the price, Napoleon sells to Mr. He is outraged, however, to discover that Mr. Frederick paid him with fake banknotes. The next morning, Mr. Frederick and his men attack the farm and blow up the windmill. Though Boxer is nearing retirement age, he does not slow down, wanting to contribute what he can before he retires. Meanwhile, the preferential treatment the pigs grant themselves only grows more obvious. Piglets are discouraged from playing with other young animals, and it is decreed that any animals meeting a pig on a path must step aside.

Though the animals remain tired and hungry, Squealer continually announces that the farm is more productive and successful than ever.

  • Snowball and Boxer are awarded medals for their bravery;
  • He blows up the windmill after it was repaired and kills many animals;
  • He is the strongest worker among the animals;
  • Jones forces the animals to work too hard and then steals the products of their labor;
  • They decide the farm will now be ruled only by animals, calling the system "animalism";
  • He is based on Tsar Nicholas II.

As the animals no longer clearly remember what life was like under Mr. One day, Boxer collapses while working on the windmill. Three days later, the pigs announce that Boxer died at the hospital.

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As the years pass, many of the animals on the farm grow old and die; there are only a few left who remember the days before the rebellion.

One day, however, the animals are shocked to see that the pigs have learned to walk on two legs. A week later, Napoleon invites several humans, including Mr. Pilkington, to visit the farm. The men tour the farm and commend Napoleon for making the animals work so hard for so little food.

Later that night, the animals watch through a farmhouse window as the pigs play cards with the men. As the animals look through the window, they suddenly realize that they can no longer tell the difference between the men and the pigs.