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A discussion on sports fans using modern technology for watching sports

Today, watching live sports is an even more active experience because our devices are always within reach. But what triggers us to reach for them?

To find out, we visited soccer and football fans in Denver and Chicago, sat in their living rooms, watched games with them, and asked lots of questions.

Technology has changed the way we experience sport

By unpacking second-screen behaviors, we uncovered how brands can deliver more engaging marketing during the big game. Mobile is changing how we watch sports Tim is watching a game on TV. We're 30 minutes into the first half, and it's been a snoozer.

Collective moments such as big televised sporting events are prime second screen territory, and our research shows that events such as the Oscars attract a similar level of engagement. Put simply, if there's something big happening on the first screen, there's probably something big happening on the second screen, too.

The recent surge in smartphone penetration has opened the door to this dramatic shift in behavior.

Sports Fans and the Second Screen

What's clear is that fans are not only searching more on mobile, but they're also searching during the game: This change creates more moments for marketers to reach fans on the mobile web, right when they're most engaged. In every living room that we visited, people talked about using their devices to connect with other fans.

  1. Trash talk and sports debates build social connections. But what triggers us to reach for them?
  2. Others were focused on being the first to broadcast cool content and have their voice heard. Of course, the challenge for the future for networks is to correctly balance coverage between the three types of screens—television, computer, and mobile phones Osbourne 2010.
  3. Sharing the rush What fans want.
  4. Newspaper circulation has been slowly falling since the 1980s, but recently that descent seems to be accelerating. Anthony told us, "Of course I want my team to win, but it's really just about having a good time with my friends.
  5. USA Today is one of the first newspapers to offer subscriptions to readers for its online edition, which replicates the print version. As technology improves and access to the Internet increases, websites will fight to win consumers.

Some wanted to feel the adrenaline rush of big moments in real-time. Others were focused on being the first to broadcast cool content and have their voice heard. And for some fans, connecting meant finding a common language and building social connections out in the world, away from their televisions.

Sharing the rush Anthony and Mario are buddies from West Chicago. Both love sports, and they watch games together on Mario's couch, smartphones in hand.

During lulls in the action, they message with family and friends' an extra layer of entertainment that Anthony thinks could feel even more connected. Anthony pointed out a drawback of being in constant contact with a big social group, "I want a social network that's just for sports. I can't curse about the game on Facebook because my Mom is there. Anthony told us, "Of course I want my team to win, but it's really just about having a good time with my friends.

  • Social media such as Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, and blogs have opened up other possibilities for sport news and discussion;
  • According to a survey from the Fantasy Sports Trade Association FSTA , an industry organization that represents more than companies, an estimated 27 million American adults play fantasy sports, translating into revenue of nearly a billion dollars per year;
  • Collective moments such as big televised sporting events are prime second screen territory, and our research shows that events such as the Oscars attract a similar level of engagement;
  • It's about making logical arguments.

Social broadcasting Carlos and Rita are also into sports and are avid social networkers. For them, the second screen is less about the roar of the crowd, and more about being the first to share something cool that their peers appreciate. They are the kind of fans who love to share bite-sized visual content to show their allegiance. They're quick with comments or memes that show they're clever, and they don't mind stoking a little competitive energy.

Carlos told us, "If my friends from rival teams are bragging about a game online, I want to be able to immediately bring up stats about their team from last year to throw in their faces.

Anthony and Mario: Sharing the rush

Fans are hungry for cool content to broadcast quickly to their networks, but getting to that content can be a chore. I just want to grab them straight from the TV. They never miss a game. For them, the second screen is a way to search for facts, stats and trivia to fuel both game-time and water cooler discussions after the game. It's about making logical arguments. Trash talk and sports debates build social connections.

Whether you're making a case at a conference or talking smack at a sports bar with your friends, the second screen is where you do your homework. Engaging fans in real time: Sharing the rush What fans want: Make fan-to-fan communication more dynamic and visual.

  • Newspaper circulation has been slowly falling since the 1980s, but recently that descent seems to be accelerating;
  • Some of us use the Internet to supplement televised sport and newspaper accounts, but for the majority of younger folks, the Internet has become the primary source for news generally and sports specifically;
  • As technology improves and access to the Internet increases, websites will fight to win consumers;
  • Of course, people can also skip the advertisements if they wish, fracturing the business model that has been in place for over 50 years;
  • According to a survey from the Fantasy Sports Trade Association FSTA , an industry organization that represents more than companies, an estimated 27 million American adults play fantasy sports, translating into revenue of nearly a billion dollars per year.

Social broadcasting What fans want: Make interactions quick, and sharing seamless. Identify possible scenarios and create content that can be tweaked on the fly and quickly delivered when the time comes. You may not use it all, but the prep work will make you nimble in the moment, for maximum impact. Searching for a common language What fans want: Partner with creators and influencers to surface relevant info in engaging ways.