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A discussion on the resurrection of christ

In all likelihood, most of you reading this article already have made up your minds about the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Truth be told, the majority of you probably believe that Jesus Christ lived on this Earth for approximately 33 years, died at the hand of the Roman procurator, Pontius Pilate, was buried in a new tomb owned by Joseph of Arimathea, and miraculously defeated death by His resurrection three days later. But there may be some of you who have lingering doubts about the truthfulness of the resurrection of Christ.

In fact, many people have much more than lingering doubts; they already have made up their minds that the story of the resurrection happened too long ago, was witnessed by too few people, has not been proven scientifically, and thus should be discarded as an unreliable legend. If it cannot be proved beyond reasonable doubt that He did walk this Earth, then any discussion about whether or not He arose from the dead digresses quickly into an exercise in yarn stringing based on little more than guesswork and human imagination.

Fortunately, the fact that Jesus lived is practically universally accepted. A host of hostile witnesses testified of His life, and the New Testament documents in intricate detail His existence. Thus, knowing that Jesus Christ existed allows us to move farther into the subject of His resurrection.

First, the Bible believer accepts the fact that Jesus died because several different biblical writers confirm it. Second, the unbeliever accepts the idea, based not upon biblical evidence, but rather on the idea that the natural order of things which he has experienced in this life is for a a discussion on the resurrection of christ to live and eventually die. However, in order to provide such people with a few more inches of common ground on this matter, it would be good to note that several secular writers substantiated the fact that Jesus Christ did die.

Tacitus, the ancient Roman historian writing in approximately A. In addition to Roman sources, early Jewish rabbis whose opinions are recorded in the Talmud acknowledged the death of Jesus. According to the earlier rabbis, Jesus of Nazareth was a transgressor in Israel who practised magic, scorned the words of the wise, led the people astray, and said that he had not come to destroy the law but to add to it.

He was hanged on Passover Eve for heresy and misleading the people Bruce, 1953, p. Likewise, Jewish historian Josephus wrote: And when Pilate had condemned him to the cross on his impeachment by the chief men among us, those who had loved him at first did not cease Antiquities of the Jews, 18. The fact that Pilate condemned Christ to the cross is an undisputed historical fact.

As archaeologist Edwin Yamauchi stated: Even if we did not have the New Testament or Christian writings, we would be able to conclude from such non-Christian writings such as Josephus, the Talmud, Tacitus, and Pliny the Younger that.

After reading such in-depth, medically based descriptions of the horrors to which Christ was exposed, and the condition of His ravaged body, the Swoon Theory quickly fades into oblivion where it rightly belongs. Upon this, we all most certainly can agree. At the beginning of chapter 108 of this work, he recorded a letter that the Jewish community had been circulating concerning the empty tomb of Christ: A godless and lawless heresy had sprung from one Jesus, a Galilaean deceiver, whom we crucified, but his disciples stole him by night from the tomb where he was laid when unfastened from the cross, and now deceive men by asserting that he has risen from the dead and ascended to heaven.

  1. It has been suggested by some critics that the apostles and other witnesses did not actually see Christ, but merely hallucinated. Tacitus, the ancient Roman historian writing in approximately A.
  2. Reprinted by Christian Classics of Allen, Texas, 2304-2330, 1981. It has been suggested by some critics that the apostles and other witnesses did not actually see Christ, but merely hallucinated.
  3. Why did not the Jewish leaders take the short walk to the garden and produce the body?
  4. At the beginning of chapter 108 of this work, he recorded a letter that the Jewish community had been circulating concerning the empty tomb of Christ. My heart faints within me!
  5. Jesus of Nazareth - Holy Week.

Somewhere around the sixth century, another caustic treatise written to defame Christ circulated among the Jewish community. In this narrative, known as Toledoth Yeshu, Jesus was described as the illegitimate son of a soldier named Joseph Pandera. He also was labeled as a disrespectful deceiver who led many away from the truth. Near the end of the treatise, under a discussion of His death, the following paragraph can be found: A diligent search was made and he [Jesus—KB] was not found in the grave where he had been buried.

A gardener had taken him from the grave and had brought him into his garden and buried him in the sand over which the waters flowed into the garden. The most commonly accepted one seems to be that the disciples of Jesus stole His body away by night while the guards slept Matthew 28: Yet, how could the soldiers identify the thieves if they had been asleep?

THE RESURRECTION OF JESUS CHRIST

And why were the sentinels not punished by death for sleeping on the job and thereby losing their charge cf. And an even more pressing question comes to mind—why did the soldiers need to explain anything if a body was still in the tomb?

When Peter stood up on the Day of Pentecost, after the resurrection of Christ, the crux of his sermon rested on the facts that Jesus died, was buried, and rose again on the third day.

In order to silence Peter, and stop a mass conversion, the Jewish leaders needed simply to produce the body of Christ. Why did not the Jewish leaders take the short walk to the garden and produce the body? Simply because they could not; the tomb was empty—a fact the Jews recognized and tried to explain away. The apostles knew it, and preached it boldly in the city of Jerusalem.

And thousands of inhabitants of Jerusalem knew it and converted to Christianity. John Warwick Montgomery accurately assessed the matter when he wrote: It passes the bounds of credibility that the early Christians could have manufactured such a tale and then preached it among those who might easily have refuted it simply by producing the body of Jesus 1964, p.

The tomb of Jesus was empty, and that is a fact. The New Testament book of Acts stresses this issue almost to the point of redundancy. His point was clear: Jesus had been physically raised from the dead and the apostles had witnessed the resurrected Christ. It has been suggested by some critics that the apostles and other witnesses did not actually see Christ, but merely hallucinated. However, Gary Habermas had this to say about such a fanciful idea: