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A historical look at the infamous battle of plassey

A historical look at the infamous battle of plassey

He was born in 1733 and soon after his birth Alivardi Khan was appointed as the deputy governor of Bihar. So Siraj-ud-Daulla was regarded as a 'fortune child' in the family and his grandfather had special affection and favour for him.

It is stated that Alivardi had given his heart to Siraj-ud-Daulla from the day of his birth and 'never kept him apart from himself'. In May 1752, the nawab declared Siraj-ud-Daulla as his successor.

  • On arrival they were being led in chains through the streets of the city;
  • Plassey 1757 download plassey few battles in history have this is a perceptive and comprehensive study of the plassey revolution of 1757 the author looks at;
  • From this spot Clive advanced still further until he could fire into the Nawab's camp;
  • This granary the people called Mansurganj, i.

On this occasion the European trading companies in Bengal also greeted him. During the closing years of his reign, premature death of some family members shattered Alivardi both mentally and physically and the old nawab died on 9th April 1756 at the age of eighty.

Immediately before his death thenawab advised Siraj-ud-Daulla to strive for the suppression of the enemies of the province and devote himself to secure the well-being of the subjects by removing all evils and disorders. He implored Siraj to nurture the goodwill of the people and follow his Alivardi's footsteps.

  1. After discussion, Clive and twelve of his officers voted that the danger of defeat was too great if they should try to advance.
  2. Let his Highness the Nawab quit the field and save himself; his generals would hold the English in check and prevent their further advance.
  3. The Nawab was then to be falsely implicated in the infamous episode of the ' Black Hole ' of Calcutta 1756 AD, in which 146 English prisoners are said to have suffocated to death by being confined to a small and airless prison 24 by 18 feet 8 by 6 meters in size.
  4. The Heera Jheel palace is also known as 'Mansurganj' Palace. Immediately before his death thenawab advised Siraj-ud-Daulla to strive for the suppression of the enemies of the province and devote himself to secure the well-being of the subjects by removing all evils and disorders.
  5. The remains of the palace no longer exists.

Luke Scrafton one of The East India Company directors 1765-1768 relates that Siraj-ud-Daulla swore on the Quran at the death-bed of his grandfather that he would not touch any intoxicating liquor in future and that he kept the promise ever after. Siraj-ud-Daulla a historical look at the infamous battle of plassey for little over one year April 1756 to June 1757.

During his short lived administration the young nawab faced enemies from within the family as well as from out-side. During the reign of Alivardi Siraj-ud-Daulla built a palace named 'Heera Jheel' lake of diamonds on the opposite banks of the present Hazarduari Palace. About a mile to the north west of Fara Bagh garden of pleasureopposite to Jaffarganj, is the site of the Palace. It is said that Siraj was very jealous of his aunts palace 'Moti Jheel' and wanted a similar palace of his own.

The Heera Jheel palace is also known as 'Mansurganj' Palace. Siraj-ud-Daulla erected this palace with materials brought from the ruins of Gaur.

The remains of the palace no longer exists. By 1788 AD, due to the change of course of river Bhagirathi, the whole Palace has been destroyed. Watts, the Resident, Mr. Lushington, Ram Chand the writer, and Naba Krishna the munshi, into the vaults of the palace.

Ram Chand, at the time of the battle of Plassey, was a writer on Rs. The following story is told of its completion, to explain the name of Mansurganj: As the building was nearly finished Siraj-ud-Daulla invited Allvardi to see it. When he came,Siraj-ud-Daulla locked him up in a room, and refused to release him unless the "zamindars" there paid a fine for their land.

This request the Nawab was compelled to grant, and also to allow to his petulant grandson the privilege of erecting a granary. This granary the people called Mansurganj, i. The abwab or extraordinary taxation, extorted on this occasion, is said to have amounted to five lakhs.

Ghaseti Begum possessed huge wealth, which was the source of her influence and strength. Apprehending serious opposition from her, Siraj-ud-Daulla seized her wealth from Moti jheel Palace and placed her in confinement. Thenawab also made certain changes in high government positions giving them to his own favourites. Mohanlal was elevated to the post of peshkar of his Dewan Khana and he exercised great influence in the administration.

These supercessions caused great mortification to Mir Jafar and Raja Rajballabh. Siraj-ud-Daulla had three main grievances against the British - i the unauthorized fortifications of Fort William, ii illegal private trade and shameless abuse of dastaks by the company servants, and iii illegal shelter given to the nawab's erring subjects. The nawab asked the British to take measures to remove his grievances and sent several diplomatic missions to Calcutta for amicable settlement of the dispute.

The nawab demanded the extradition ofKrishna Das and asked the English to demolish the new fortifications and ordered to fill up the ditch, which surrounded the Calcutta Settlement. The English insulted nawab's special envoy, who carried his letter to Calcutta.

On receiving intimation of Governor Goger Drake's refusal to break down certain fortifications that were in progress at Calcutta, Siraj-ud-Daulla attacked the English fortification atCossimbazar and imprisoned all the English officers. The factory chief surrendered but the company's governor at Calcutta became obstinate. He then attacked Calcutta and drove the English out, forced Fort William to surrender.

The Nawab was then to be falsely implicated in the infamous episode of the ' Black Hole ' of Calcutta 1756 AD, in which 146 English prisoners are said to have suffocated to death by being confined to a small and airless prison 24 by 18 feet 8 by 6 meters in size. Only 23 were said to have survived the overnight ordeal. The verdict of modern historians has exculpated Siraj-ud-Daulla from his being an active accomplice of this cruel murder. Four of the survivors of that night of horror, that added its gloom to the sufferings of the victims, one of whom was Holwellwere sent up by boat to Murshidabad.

On arrival they were being led in chains through the streets of the city. Siraj on his return, while passing in his palanquin, noticed the prisoners and at once ordered their release. Meanwhile the news of the English reverses at Cossimbazar reached Clive at Madras.

Theplan of the white and the a historical look at the infamous battle of plassey treaty was then devised. When everything was finalised the company's forces under Robert Clive and Charles Watson moved towards Murshidabad. This greatly offended Clive who sent Luke Scrafton with a request that Siraj-ud-Daulla should no longer keep his army at Plassey, the whole of which under Mir Jafar was recalled to Murshidabad.

Reign as Nawab

Subsequently when the designs of the English began to ooze out, he made a reconciliation with Mir Jafar. On the 21st of June 1757, the Nawabs army took up their former positions at Plassey. On the 22nd, the English army crossed the river and advanced towards it. The battle that decided the fate of India was then fought a historical look at the infamous battle of plassey won by the English. Betrayed by Mir Jafar, and deserted by his army, Siraj-ud-Daulla lost the skirmish at Plassey on 23rd June 1757 which has been dignified by historians with the epithet 'battle'.

Siraj-ud-Daulla mounting his camel and escorted by 2000 horsemen, left the field for Murshidabad, which was reached before midnight of the 24th, with his favorite wife, Lutf-un-nisa Begum.

Mir Jafar reached Murshidabad on the 25th June and Clive on the 29th. Clive placed him on the throne, and as representative of the East India Company, presented him with a Nazar of gold mohars and congratulated him as Nawab Nazim of Bengal, Bihar and Orissa.

He informed the assembly that it was fortunate that in the place of a tyrant they had secured a good ruler. The inner treasury contained eight crores. Clive and others went to Jagat Seth's house Madhab Rai and Swaroop Chand and there arranged for the payments of the Stipulated amounts.

On the eighth day of his flight, Siraj-ud-Daulla, was brought back to Murshidabad and put to death by Mir Jafar's son Miran.

There is a controversy over Siraj's death. Some historians say He was killed by Muhammad-i-Beg under instruction from Miran, others say He was shot and killed by a British soldier. The murder, according to the most authentic accounts, took place in the compound of the Jafarganj Deorhi, known as Nimak Haram Deorhi.

  • Clive and others went to Jagat Seth's house Madhab Rai and Swaroop Chand and there arranged for the payments of the Stipulated amounts;
  • So Siraj-ud-Daulla was regarded as a 'fortune child' in the family and his grandfather had special affection and favour for him;
  • The abwab or extraordinary taxation, extorted on this occasion, is said to have amounted to five lakhs;
  • Siraj-ud-Daulla erected this palace with materials brought from the ruins of Gaur;
  • His death in Siraj-ud-Daulla's presence increased that young man's terror;
  • Only 5,000 troops actually engaged in battle, which was still significantly superior to the estimated 2,500 British soldiers facing them and there was a time when Clive thought that he would be forced to retreat.

There was much trouble to him. On the morning of 21st June Clive called a war council, with Major Kilpatrick the second-in-command and five seniors and put to it the question, 'Whether in our present situation, without assistance and on our bottom, it would be prudent to attack the Nawab, or whether we should wait till joined by some country power'. After discussion, Clive and twelve of his officers voted that the danger of defeat was too great if they should try to advance: On the other hand, seven officers, led byMajor Eyre Coote, voted against this, and advised an instant attack on the Nawab's camp.

By thirteen to seven the council decided not to fight. Then Clive was left by himself.

  1. He was not happy in his mind, and as he strolled about in the shade of the trees he began to think the whole question over again.
  2. Find great deals for the battle of plassey 1757 by stuart reid 2017, hardcover the battle of plassey 1757 the victory escape calcutta and the infamous.
  3. During the closing years of his reign, premature death of some family members shattered Alivardi both mentally and physically and the old nawab died on 9th April 1756 at the age of eighty.
  4. Clive was now in real danger of encirclement.

He was not happy in his mind, and as he strolled about in the shade of the trees he began to think the whole question over again. Delay, he, knew, was dangerous, and would, moreover, give time for the French to come to the help of the Nawab; the more the delay, the worse the position for the English.

In an hour Clive had made up his mind; he would fight. During the day no movement was made. The little army started at sunset, and after a terrible march in pouring rain, often through water waist-deep, reached Plassey at one in the morning, utterly worn out, Here they camped in a grove of mango-trees near the river, and not more than a mile from Siraj-ud-Daulla's army.

The grove was about eight hundred yards long, by three hundred broad, and round it was a ditch and a bank of earth.

It was a good position to defend. Close at hand stood a little hunting-box belonging to Siraj-ud-Daulla, and which was surrounded by a strong wall. Clive at once occupied this house. At night, as Clive reflected in his tent,the monsoon burst with torrents of rain, a warning that action must be speedy or it would be impossible.

Clive must have had some bad moments in the flickering candlelight beneath the thudding of the rain. The next afternoon came what he had probably been waiting for, another message from Mir Jafar. He was on the march; he would inform Clive of his arrival at thenawabs camp; the time for action had come. Two hours after receiving the message he crossed the river and made his way in pouring rain to Plassey grove.

In the hard light Clive surveyed the scene of the battle.

To the north across bright green fields lay Siraj-ud-Daulla's entrenched camp projecting from a loop in the river Bhagirathi. The East India Company's army led by Robert Clive, consisting of 950 Europeans and 2100 native Indian sepoys and a small number of guns was vastly outnumbered. The Nawab had an army of about 50,000 with some heavy artillery operated by about 40 French soldiers sent by the French East India Company.

However, 16,000 of the 50,000 were under the control of Mir Jafar. Along with Mir Jafar, the troops commanded by Yar Latif and Rai Durlabh did not take part in the battle because of a secret pact made with the British. Only 5,000 troops actually engaged in battle, which was still significantly superior to the estimated 2,500 British soldiers facing them and there was a time when Clive thought that he would be forced to retreat.

About three quarters of a mile to the south of the southern portion of Siraj's entrenchment lay Plassey House, a substantial hunting lodge surrounded by a wall, standing on the river bank.

Just south of the lodge was a mango grove which gave shelter for Clive's force. A mile to the south again was the village of Plassey. Spreading out east of the river was a large treeless plain giving ample space for manoeuvre. Between the hunting-lodge and the entrenchment lay two tanks or artificial ponds which were to prove important in the battle.

The rest of the force lined the edge of the groove with their 8 remaining guns in front. At dawn Siraj-ud-Daulla's army marched out of their camp, gradually forming a semi-circle from the entrenchment nearly to the mango grove, thus threatening to outflank the small British force.

In determined hands this threat could have proved lethal, but the encircling division was commanded by Mir Jafar himself.