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A personal reflection on the art of communicating

Mariya’s first semester reflections and favorite class

But a few moments later, the math major in me realized that a quarter of my entire graduate career was behind me. With this epiphany, I felt both sad and surprised at how quickly time flies. This I do not remember. OK, so I know that was kind of corny, but I hope it made for a good sound bite. As I reflect on my classes from the fall semester, Arts of Communication stands out as particularly special, challenging, and rewarding.

I went back to the ever-stressful task of finalizing my course schedule and scribbled in Wednesday evenings for a full-semester course on how to become an effective communicator. In Arts of Communication — or AoC for short — we learned by doing.

We learned to connect with an audience by practicing logos, pathos, and ethos in our presentations. We recorded ourselves as we learned to face the camera and report from a studio. We practiced job interviews, debated controversial issues, and held press conferences where I acted as the recently elected Muslim mayor of Chicago. Perhaps most important, we learned through active listening and observing, as well as giving and receiving feedback with humility.

We were very fortunate that our class coincided with the U. The campaign cycle provided live debates, speeches, and advertisements for us to dissect and analyze.

  • We recorded ourselves as we learned to face the camera and report from a studio;
  • Methods This was a mainly qualitative study;
  • The use of creative work has potential to meet this need [ 22 ].

What made AoC unique among my fall semester courses, however, was the appeal to different emotions and the closeness of the class. I did not expect a graduate course to make me laugh and cry; yet, I found myself chuckling as my peers amused the class with wit, and silently sobbing as they shared personal experiences.

Through speeches, debates, videos, and impromptu gigs, AoC continually pushed us out of our comfort zones, yet our common vulnerability and trust in each other bonded us as a community. By the middle of the course, we had become a family that looked after each other and served as a mutual support system. The course itself was time-consuming and challenging.

Personal Reflection Assignment for COMU1010

At the beginning of the semester, Professor Mankad said that becoming a better speaker would require dedication outside of the class. The video assignment, for example, took me hours to complete: Although I felt frustrated during the process, I am grateful to the patience of my classmate Yutaro, who taught me iMovie software so that I could produce a six-minute Snapchat video.

  • These reflections and contributions have led to a exhibition and publication Sideways;
  • Methods Participants were recruited at the completion of the 2012 academic year from the cohort of 55 students who had chosen the creative option;
  • Through speeches, debates, videos, and impromptu gigs, AoC continually pushed us out of our comfort zones, yet our common vulnerability and trust in each other bonded us as a community;
  • We practiced job interviews, debated controversial issues, and held press conferences where I acted as the recently elected Muslim mayor of Chicago;
  • In Arts of Communication — or AoC for short — we learned by doing.

I reflected deeply upon my life experiences, went through multiple iterations of speechwriting, and spent days rehearsing my value speech with family, friends, and roommates. I delivered a speech about why one particular conversation with my father made me realize how much I value his support. Through AoC, we grew as individuals and as a class.

We will share the special bond we forged in this course for the rest of our lives, and for that we are truly grateful to Professor Mankad.

As, in his past career, he had been a television anchor in India, a consultant for top firms, and a director of a foundation, Professor Mankad brought a depth of experience to the classroom. Moreover, his dedication to all 60 of his students — 30 in the full course, 30 in the module-version of the class — was evident by his accessibility, detailed feedback, and time he spent listening to hundreds of speeches.

It is no surprise the course has attracted the highest numbers of cross-registered students at Fletcher. I am eager to apply the skills I have gained in AoC in all aspects of my life.

My first stab of pushing a personal reflection on the art of communicating as a public speaker was in early December at a forum organized by the Fletcher International Law Students Association, where I presented on the legal aspects of UN Article 2 4a topic I had become extremely interested in through my International Organizations course.

This semester, I am eager to take a course at Harvard, switch up my extracurricular activities, and participate in the conferences I have been helping to organize. Stay tuned, because my next post will probably be from Islamabad or Lahore, inshallah! The AoC class celebrates at the end of the semester.