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An introduction to the history of studying at university of wisconsin

History (HISTORY)

From the later Roman Empire to the end of the Middle Ages. None View details Course Designation: An introduction to world history, 1450-1800, when new connections were forged between continents and, arguably, "the world" became one place.

College Degree Requirements

We shall study travelers, merchants, refugees, and empires, and the objects that bound them together: Ming porcelain and silk, woolen blankets and calico, silver and cochineal. We shall explore changing understandings of boundaries, oceans, travel, and "the world" itself.

  1. How did today's biology emerge out of the diverse traditions of agriculture and natural history bees and trees, biomedicine and molecular biology, germs and genes that stretch back into the eighteenth century?
  2. Political, economic, social, and cultural history of Great Britain.
  3. An introduction to world history, 1450-1800, when new connections were forged between continents and, arguably, "the world" became one place. Political, economic, social, and cultural history of modern Western civilization.
  4. In the first unit, we investigate the origins of the institutions, technologies, and styles of practice that characterize contemporary biology, such as the use of mice as "model organisms" for understanding human diseases. A major and a minor or a major and certificate or two majors if available may not be elected in the same department or program, except in the approved combinations listed here.

Principal developments in the history of Europe from the Renaissance to the fall of Napoleon. Political, economic, social, and cultural history of modern Western civilization. Political, economic, social, and cultural history from earliest historic times.

Political, economic, social, and cultural history of Great Britain.

  • This course explores events in the history of biology from the mid-twentieth century to today, and examines how developments in this science have shaped and are shaped by society;
  • How did today's biology emerge out of the diverse traditions of agriculture and natural history bees and trees, biomedicine and molecular biology, germs and genes that stretch back into the eighteenth century?

From Teddy Roosevelt's 1909 African safari to the Hollywood blockbuster King Kong, from the world of Walt Disney to The March of the Penguins, cinema has been a powerful force in shaping public and scientific understanding of nature throughout the twentieth and twenty-first century.

How can film shed light on changing environmental ideas and beliefs in American thought, politics, and culture? And how can we come to see and appreciate contested issues of race, class, and gender in nature on screen?

History of Science (HIST SCI)

This course will explore such questions as we come to understand the role of film in helping to define the contours of past, present, and future environmental visions in the United States, and their impact on the real world struggles of people and wildlife throughout the world. Explores the interplay between Africa and the World from the 19th century to the present, covering subjects such as the slave- trade, repatriation, Africanizing of culture in the Americas and Europe, the spread and revival of world religions, colonialism, global capitalism, the rise of global popular culture such as pop music and video films, environmental concerns and global epidemics.

History, Major - Liberal Arts

Introduction to major themes in world history. Such themes might include: Survey of Christianity from its beginnings to its diverse global manifestations today, including beliefs, institutions, ritual, lived experience, and interactions with broader culture and society.

How did today's biology emerge out of the diverse traditions of agriculture and natural history bees and trees, biomedicine and molecular biology, germs and genes that stretch back into the eighteenth century?

  1. This course explores events in the history of biology from the mid-twentieth century to today, and examines how developments in this science have shaped and are shaped by society.
  2. From Teddy Roosevelt's 1909 African safari to the Hollywood blockbuster King Kong, from the world of Walt Disney to The March of the Penguins, cinema has been a powerful force in shaping public and scientific understanding of nature throughout the twentieth and twenty-first century. We shall explore changing understandings of boundaries, oceans, travel, and "the world" itself.
  3. This course will explore such questions as we come to understand the role of film in helping to define the contours of past, present, and future environmental visions in the United States, and their impact on the real world struggles of people and wildlife throughout the world.
  4. This course will explore such questions as we come to understand the role of film in helping to define the contours of past, present, and future environmental visions in the United States, and their impact on the real world struggles of people and wildlife throughout the world. Such themes might include.

In this course, we examine classic texts and "game-changes" in the history of biology, putting them into broader scientific and social contexts to see how these different ways of knowing intertwined, competed, and yielded novel approaches to the study of life that still shape today's life sciences. A global comparative and transnational survey of women and gender from the ancient world to the modern period.

Introduces students to key issues in the history of women and gender, including the historical construction of identities, roles, symbols, and power relationships.