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An introduction to the importance and the popularity of the internet in todays society

A canvassing of 2,558 experts and technology builders about where we will stand by the year 2025 finds striking patterns in their predictions. They registered their answers online between November 25, 2013 and January 13, 2014. From that, everything flows. Most believe there will be: Tagging, databasing, and intelligent analytical mapping of the physical and social realms. Most say they believe the results of that connectivity will be primarily positive. However, when asked to describe the good and bad aspects of the future they foresee, many of the experts can also clearly identify areas of concern, some of them extremely threatening.

Heightened concerns over interpersonal ethics, surveillance, terror, and crime, may lead societies to question how best to establish security and trust while retaining civil liberties.

Overall, these expert predictions can be grouped into 15 identifiable theses about our digital future — eight of which we characterize as being hopeful, six as concerned, and another as a kind of neutral, sensible piece of advice that the choices that are made now will shape the future. Many involve similar views of the ways technology will change, but differ in their sense of the impact of those technical advances.

They are listed below, numbered for the sake of convenience to readers navigating this document, not in a rank ordering. More-hopeful theses 1 Information sharing over the Internet will be so effortlessly interwoven into daily life that it will become invisible, flowing like electricity, often through machine intermediaries.

A brief history of the internet over the past 20 years and the role of the World Wide Web

More and more, humans will be in a world in which decisions are being made by an active set of cooperating devices. The Internet and computer-mediated communication in general will become more pervasive but less explicit and visible. It will, to some extent, blend into the background of all we do.

We will see more planetary friendships, rivalries, romances, work teams, study groups, and collaborations. The change in the emotional landscape conferred by people being able to communicate very cheaply irrespective of geography is still only dimly understood.

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Patrick Tucker, author of The Naked Future: We will become far more knowledgeable about the consequences of our actions; we will edit our behavior more quickly and intelligently. This will change how we think about people, how we establish trust, how we negotiate change, failure, and success. This will change a lot of social practices, such as dating, job interviewing and professional networking, and gaming, as well as policing and espionage.

We may literally be able to adjust both medications and lifestyle changes on a day-by-day basis or even an hour-by-hour basis, thus enormously magnifying the effectiveness of an ever more understaffed medical delivery system.

Post moves into the digital age (1995 - 1999)

Like the Arab Spring, we can expect more and more uprisings to take place as people become more informed and able to communicate their concerns. When every person on this planet can reach, and communicate two-way, with every other person on this planet, the power of nation-states to control every human inside its geographic boundaries may start to diminish. Traditional structures of government and governance are therefore ill-equipped to create the sensors, the flows, the ability to recognize patterns, the ability to identify root causes, the ability to act on the insights gained, the ability to do any or all of this at speed, while working collaboratively across borders and time zones and sociopolitical systems and cultures.

From climate change to disease control, from water conservation to nutrition, from the resolution of immune-system-weakness conditions to an introduction to the importance and the popularity of the internet in todays society the growing obesity problem, the answer lies in what the Internet will be in decades to come.

By 2025, we will have a good idea of its foundations. Some will require verified identification to access, while others will promise increased privacy. Global connectivity will continue to exist, but through a series of separate channels controlled by a series of separate protocols. Our use of separate channels for separate applications will be necessitated by security problems, cyber policy of nations and corporations, and our continued attempts to find better ways to do things.

The biggest impact on the world will be universal access to all human knowledge. The smartest person in the world currently could well be stuck behind a plow in India or China. Enabling that person — and the millions like him or her — will have a profound impact on the development of the human race. Cheap mobile devices will be available worldwide, and educational tools like the Khan Academy will be available to everyone. This will have a huge impact on literacy and numeracy and will lead to a more informed and more educated world population.

But … civilization deals with bad acting through development of manners, norms, laws and regulations. Expect all of those to emerge and evolve over the coming years. But the Internet has already made it possible for us to use one of our unique graces — the ability to share knowledge — for good, and to a degree never before possible.

Social media will facilitate and amplify the feelings of loss and abuse. Cyber-terrorism will become commonplace. Privacy and confidentiality of any and all personal will become a thing of the past. The digital divide will grow and worsen beyond the control of nations or global organizations such as the UN. This will increasingly polarize the planet between haves and have-nots. Global companies will exploit this polarization. Digital criminal networks will become realities of the new frontiers.

Terrorism, both by organizations and individuals, will be daily realities. The world will become less and less safe, and only personal skills and insights will protect individuals. Abusers evolve and scale far more than regular Internet users. That is, filters will be increasingly valuable and important, and effective and useful filters will be able to charge for their services.

Digital Life in 2025

People will be more than happy to trade the free-wheeling aspect common to many Internet sites for more structured and regulated environments. But that will also tempt us to stop seeking out knowledge, narrowing our horizons, even as we delve evermore deep.

The privacy premium may also be a factor: There are very few experts focused on this, and yet the rise of digital media promises significant disruption to relations between and among states. It is not merely a tool of enforcing existing systems; it is a structural change in the systems that we are used to.

And this means that we are truly going through a paradigm shift — which is celebratory for what it brings, but it also produces great precariousness because existing structures lose meaning and valence, and hence, a new world order needs to be produced in order to accommodate for these new modes of being and operation.

The greatest impact of the Internet is what we are already witnessing, but it is going to accelerate. How will we provide for the humans who can no longer earn money through labor? The opportunities are simply tremendous.

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It offers an unbridled ability to collaborate, share, and interact. These paths help us to be better prepared for long-term contingencies; by identifying key indicators, and amplifying signals of change, they help us ensure that our decisions along the way are flexible enough to accommodate change… That billions more people are poised to come online in the emerging economies seems certain.

Yet much remains uncertain: As users, industry players, and policymakers, the interplay of decisions that we make today and in the near future will determine the evolution of the Internet and the shape it takes by 2025, in both intended and unintended ways. Regardless of how the future unfolds, the Internet will evolve in ways we can only begin to imagine.

By allowing ourselves to explore and rehearse divergent and plausible futures for the Internet, not only do we prepare for any future, we can also help shape it for the better.