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An introduction to the incident command system ics

Comprehensive resource management ensures that visibility is maintained over all resources so they can be moved quickly to support the preparation and response to an incident, and ensuring a graceful demobilization. It also applies to the classification of resources by type and kind, and the categorization of resources by their status.

Assigned resources are those that are working on a field assignment under the direction of a supervisor. Available resources are those that are ready for deployment stagedbut have not been assigned to a field assignment. Out-of-service resources are those that are not in either the "available" or "assigned" categories.

Resources can be "out-of-service" for a variety of reasons including: The cards are placed in T-Card racks located at an Incident Command Post for easy updating and visual tracking of resource status.

Integrated communications[ edit ] Developing an integrated voice and data communications system, including equipment, systems, and protocols, must occur prior an introduction to the incident command system ics an incident. Effective ICS communications include three elements: The "hardware" systems that transfer information. Planning for the use of all available communications resources. The procedures and processes for transferring information internally and externally.

Incident commander[ edit ] Single incident commander - Most incidents involve a single incident commander. In these incidents, a single person commands the incident response and is the decision-making final authority. Unified Command - A Unified Command involves two or more individuals sharing the authority normally held by a single incident commander.

Unified Command is used on larger incidents usually when multiple agencies or multiple jurisdictions are involved. A Unified Command acts as a single entity.

It is important to note, that in Unified Command the command representatives will appoint a single Operations Section Chief. Generally, an Area Commander will be assigned - a single person - and the Area Command will operate as a logistical and administrative support. Area Commands usually do not include an Operations function.

Command staff[ edit ] Safety officer - The Safety Officer monitors safety conditions and develops measures for assuring the safety of all assigned personnel. While less often discussed, the Public Information Officer is also responsible for ensuring that an incident's command staff are kept apprised as to what is being said or reported about an incident. This allows public questions to be addressed, rumors to be managed, and ensures that other such public relations issues are not overlooked.

Tasked with directing all actions to meet the incident objectives. Tasked with the collection and display of incident information, primarily consisting of the status of all resources and overall status of the incident.

Tasked with tracking incident related costs, personnel records, requisitions, and administrating procurement contracts required by Logistics. Tasked with providing all resources, services, and support required by the incident.

This role is unique in ICS as it can be arranged in multiple ways based on the judgement of the Incident Commander and needs of the incident.

Incident Command System

The three possible arrangements are: It acts as an introduction to the utilization of more than one agency and the possibility of numerous operational periods.

Topics covered include the characteristics of incident complexity, the approaches to dividing an incident into manageable components, the establishment of an "Area Command", and the MultiAgency Coordination System MACS. Personnel[ edit ] ICS is organized by levels, with the supervisor of each level holding a unique title e.

Levels supervising person's title are: Group Supervisor - A Group is a unit arranged for a purpose, along agency lines if necessary, or based on the makeup of the resources within the Group. This is the smallest level within ICS and usually refers to a single person or piece of equipment. It can refer to a piece of equipment and operator, and less often to multiple people working together.

Facilities[ edit ] ICS uses a standard set of facility nomenclature. Response operations can form a complex structure that must be held together by response personnel working at different and often widely separate incident facilities.

  1. Area Commands usually do not include an Operations function. The common functions of all EOC's is to collect, gather and analyze data; make decisions that protect life and property, maintain continuity of the organization, within the scope of applicable laws; and disseminate those decisions to all concerned agencies and individuals.
  2. For many jurisdictions the EOC is where elected officials will be located during an emergency and, like a MACC, supports but does not command an incident. The common functions of all MACC's is to collect, gather and analyze data; make decisions that protect life and property, maintain continuity of the government or corporation, within the scope of applicable laws; and disseminate those decisions to all concerned agencies and individuals.
  3. It can refer to a piece of equipment and operator, and less often to multiple people working together. Position-specific training courses include.
  4. The Base may be collocated with the Incident Command Post.
  5. Command staff[ edit ] Safety officer - The Safety Officer monitors safety conditions and develops measures for assuring the safety of all assigned personnel.

These facilities can include: There is only one ICP for each incident or event, but it may change locations during the event. Every incident or event must have some form of an Incident Command Post.

The ICP may be located in a vehicle, trailer, tent, or within a building. The ICP will be positioned outside of the present and potential hazard zone but close enough to the incident to maintain command.

The ICP will be designated by the name of the incident, e. Can be a location at or near an incident scene where tactical response resources are stored while they await assignment. Resources in staging area are under the control status. Staging Areas should be located close enough to the incident for a timely response, but far enough away to be out of the immediate impact zone. There may be more than one Staging Area at an incident. A Base is the location from which primary logistics and administrative functions are coordinated and administered.

The Base may be collocated with the Incident Command Post. There is only one Base per incident, and it is designated by the incident name. The Base is established and managed by the Logistics Section.

The resources in the Base are always out-of-service. Locations, often temporary, within the general incident area that are equipped and staffed to provide sleeping, food, water, sanitation, and other services to response personnel that are too far away to use base facilities. Other resources may also be kept at a camp to support incident operations if a Base is not accessible to all resources. Camps are designated by geographic location or number. Multiple Camps may be used, but not all incidents will have Camps.

Helibases are generally used on a more long-term basis and include such services as fueling and maintenance. The Helibase is usually designated by the name of the incident, e.

IS-100.C: Introduction to the Incident Command System, ICS 100

Helispots are more temporary locations at the incident, where helicopters can safely land and take off. Multiple Helispots may be used. Each facility has unique location, space, equipment, materials, and supplies requirements that are often difficult to address, particularly at the outset of response operations. For this reason, responders should identify, pre-designate and pre-plan the layout of these facilities, whenever possible.

On large or multi-level incidents, higher-level support facilities may be activated. An EOC is responsible for the strategic overview, or "big picture", of the disaster, and does not normally directly control field assets, instead making operational decisions and leaving tactical decisions to lower commands. The common functions of all EOC's is to collect, gather and analyze data; make decisions that protect life and property, maintain continuity of the organization, within the scope of applicable laws; and disseminate those decisions to all concerned agencies and individuals.

A JIC is the facility whereby an incident, agency, or jurisdiction can support media representatives.

  1. It can refer to a piece of equipment and operator, and less often to multiple people working together. Available resources are those that are ready for deployment staged , but have not been assigned to a field assignment.
  2. Generally, an Area Commander will be assigned - a single person - and the Area Command will operate as a logistical and administrative support. Multiple Camps may be used, but not all incidents will have Camps.
  3. Command staff[ edit ] Safety officer - The Safety Officer monitors safety conditions and develops measures for assuring the safety of all assigned personnel.

Most often the JIC also provides both space and technical assets Internet, telephone, power necessary for the media to perform their duties. A JIC very often becomes the "face" of an incident as it is where press releases are made available as well as where many broadcast media outlets interview incident staff.

Large mass gathering events, such as a presidential inauguration, will also utilize JOC-type facilities although they are often not identified as such or their existence even publicized. The MACC is a central command and control facility responsible for the strategic, or "big picture" of a disaster.

A MACC is often used when multiple incidents are occurring in one area or are particularly complex for various reasons such as when scarce resources must be allocated across multiple requests. The MACC coordinates activities between multiple agencies and incidents and does not normally directly control field assets, but makes strategic decisions and leaves tactical decisions to individual agencies.

The common functions of all MACC's is to collect, gather and analyze data; make decisions that protect life and property, maintain continuity of the government or corporation, within the scope of applicable laws; and disseminate those decisions to all concerned agencies and individuals. While often similar to an EOC, the MACC is a separate entity with a defined area or mission and lifespan whereas an EOC is a permanently established facility and operation for a political jurisdiction or agency.

For many jurisdictions the EOC is where elected officials will be located during an emergency and, like a MACC, supports but does not command an incident. ICS uses a standard set of equipment nomenclature. Tender - Like a tanker, but a ground vehicle, also carrying fuel Fuel Tenderwater Water Tenderor even fire fighting foam Foam Tender.

Type and kind[ edit ] The "type" of resource describes the size or capability of a resource. Types are designed to be categorized as "Type 1" through "Type 5" formally, but in live incidents more specific information may be used.

The "kind" of resource describes what the resource is. For instance, generator or a truck. The "type" of resource describes a performance capability for a kind of resource for instance, In both type and kind, the objective must be included in the resource request. This is done to widen the potential resource response. Fixed-wing aircraft, Type I. In this example, requesting only a fixed-wing or a rotary-wing, or requesting by type may prevent the other resource's availability from being known.

Command transfer[ edit ] A role of responsibility can be transferred during an incident for several reasons: As the incident grows a more qualified person is required to take over as Incident Commander to handle the ever-growing needs of the incident, or in reverse where as an incident reduces in size command can be passed down to a less qualified person but still qualified to run the now-smaller incident to free up highly qualified resources for other tasks or incidents.

Other reasons to transfer command include jurisdictional change if the incident moves locations or area of responsibility, or normal turnover of personnel due to extended incidents. The transfer of command an introduction to the incident command system ics always includes a transfer of command briefing, which may be oral, an introduction to the incident command system ics, or a combination of both.