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An overview of the novel the stranger by arthur camus

Context and analysis

The Stranger by Albert Camus is a very short novel that can easily be read in an afternoon. However, digesting the content will certainly take much longer as this little novel raises serious questions about morality, society, justice, religion, and individuality.

The Stranger is recounted in first person is a very direct, no nonsense style. Meusault is not overly shocked as his mother is old and has been living in a home for the elderly. The funeral is followed by more everyday events and an ill-fated growing friendship with a local pimp.

  1. The novel is famous for its first lines. The original translation by Stuart Gilbert was the classic translation for over 30 years.
  2. Look no further for a short but powerful novel that explores the absurdities of life. The original translation by Stuart Gilbert was the classic translation for over 30 years.
  3. Eventually, Meursault is found guilty of murder with malice aforethought and is sentenced to death by guillotine.
  4. Raymond, an unsavoury friend, is eventually arrested for assaulting his mistress and asks Meursault to vouch for him to the police. A good example can be found at the beginning of Part 2.

Somehow the forces of nature and man conspire to work on Meursault in a manner that causes a sudden outburst of violence that shatters his world. The second half of The Stranger follows Meursault as he experiences the legal system for the first time. Meursault soon finds himself trapped in a web of chance events magnified by his own failure to behave as expected by society. First, he is a French colonist in Algeria.

Second, and even more important, he seems cut off from normal feelings, mostly due to his desire to live honestly without pretense. There are three English translations of The Stranger.

The original translation by Stuart Gilbert was the classic translation for over 30 years. More recently, in 1982, a new English translation appeared by Joseph Laredo which was titled The Outsider. This latest translation has been praised for modernizing the language while being very true to the original and I fully agree with this assessment.

  • De sorte que je ne me suis pas rendu compte de ce qui se passait;
  • Meursault agrees without emotion;
  • The Stranger by Albert Camus is a very short novel that can easily be read in an afternoon;
  • Somehow the forces of nature and man conspire to work on Meursault in a manner that causes a sudden outburst of violence that shatters his world;
  • So, really, I hardly took stock of what was happening.

I also struggled through the original French version when I took French in college. For American readers, I definitely recommend the Matthew Ward translation which replaces some outdated vocabulary with modern words and uses American vocabulary rather than British.

  • The Stranger by Albert Camus is a very short novel that can easily be read in an afternoon;
  • More recently, in 1982, a new English translation appeared by Joseph Laredo which was titled The Outsider;
  • The Stranger is recounted in first person is a very direct, no nonsense style;
  • The murder has been read by some as a metaphor for the treatment of Algerian Muslims by the colonizing French;
  • Raymond soon encounters a group of men, including the brother of his mistress.

A good example can be found at the beginning of Part 2. De sorte que je ne me suis pas rendu compte de ce qui se passait.

The Stranger

So, really, I hardly took stock of what was happening. Everyone should read The Stranger from older teens on up.

  • Meursault agrees without emotion;
  • Somehow the forces of nature and man conspire to work on Meursault in a manner that causes a sudden outburst of violence that shatters his world;
  • He also did not identify himself as an existentialist;
  • So, really, I hardly took stock of what was happening;
  • Camus published The Stranger at a time when Algerians were demanding political autonomy with increased forcefulness; although France did extend some rights during the 1940s, ongoing conflicts and failed French promises of more independence culminated in the outbreak of the Algerian War in 1954.

Look no further for a short but powerful novel that explores the absurdities of life.