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Compare and contrast movie and book fight club

Fight Club vs. Fight Club: Important Changes Between the Book and the Movie Adaptation

Rhetorical Representations in Books and Film This blog has been created for you to post your brilliant and provocative thoughts relating to current events reported in the media, ideas discussed in class and important moments from the text.

This written exercise gives you yet another platform to express your ideas and the opportunity to respond to the ideas of others. I hope all of you will welcome each others comments and ideas with the utmost respect. Saturday, November 3, 2007 Fight Club: As is always the case, the movie is a bit of a toned down version of the book.

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In the movie, Tyler isn't quite as psychotic as he is in the book. Although he is still a terrorist and chaos is still his mission, he doesn't go as far in the movie as he does in the book.

Movie and Book comparison [Fight Club]

He also never intends to kill anyone in the movie - his gun not being loaded when he threatens Raymond K. I suppose that this is done to make him more likeable. In any case, Marla is actually a lot more likeable in the movie than in the book.

  1. The narrator ends up in a mental institution where members of Project mayhem indicate that they are still carrying out the wishes of Tyler Durden.
  2. As is always the case, the movie is a bit of a toned down version of the book.
  3. Rhetorical Representations in Books and Film This blog has been created for you to post your brilliant and provocative thoughts relating to current events reported in the media, ideas discussed in class and important moments from the text. Finally, the briefcase serves as a major first clue that Tyler and the narrator are in fact the same person.

Overall, though, the scenery fits the story, the actors fit their roles, and the whole thing - fight scenes included - looks realistic enough. There are minor deviations in the movie from the book — such as the first time that Tyler and the main character meet, the attack on the police commissioner at the banquet, and attack on the main character at the police station — but these all help with the flow of the storyline.

The ending, most notably of all, is different.

Book versus movie: David Fincher’s ‘Fight Club’ breaks the first rule of adaptations (it’s better)

In the movie, it is a bit happier. Hints regarding the identity of Tyler are presented as cleverly in the movie as they are in the book. In both the book and the movie, the main character himself also foreshadows the truth.

He asks if it is possible to wake up as someone else, and mentions how his fight with himself reminds him of his first fight with Tyler. The tongue-in-cheek humor of the book is translated very well into the movie. In general, this is one of the few good book-to-movie adaptations that Hollywood has successfully made.

  1. It also sets up the antagonistic relationship between Tyler and the narrator over the affair with Marla, even though they are the same person. He also never intends to kill anyone in the movie - his gun not being loaded when he threatens Raymond K.
  2. After all, the source material is essentially the same, but even the most subtle differences can change the way the story is told or even the story itself. He asks if it is possible to wake up as someone else, and mentions how his fight with himself reminds him of his first fight with Tyler.
  3. The use of language in the novel had well thought descriptions which indicates the narrator had a hole in his face, half his tongue chopped off by his own teeth, and even a broken nose.
  4. It moves like a fever dream propelled by the rantings of a man constantly slipping in and out of a fugue. The narrators name is never mentioned in both the movie and the novel which keeps us wondering.

Posted by Ola Mik at.