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Declaration of the rights of man and the citizen

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Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

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Course content Course content French Revolution This free course is available to start right now. Review the full course description and key learning outcomes and create an account and enrol if you want a free statement of participation. Free course French Revolution 2.

  • Constitution, it discusses the need to provide for the common defense and states some broad principles of taxation which overturned the tax standards of the pre-revolutionary era, in which the Church and the nobility were exempted from most taxes;
  • The free communication of ideas and opinions is one of the most precious of the rights of man.

The Declaration also prefaced the later constitutions of 1793 and 1795. Exercise 3 Now read this document above.

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How far do you see in it the influence of the Enlightenment? What was revolutionary about it?

  1. Review the full course description and key learning outcomes and create an account and enrol if you want a free statement of participation.
  2. Do you notice any similarity with What is the Third Estate?
  3. These limits can only be determined by law.
  4. A society in which the observance of the law is not assured, nor the separation of powers defined, has no constitution at all.
  5. Do you notice any similarity with What is the Third Estate?

These rights were declared to be inalienable: They were to be entrenched in the constitution. Article 1 reaffirmed the principle of equality: The rights of man included freedom from arbitrary arrest and imprisonment, freedom of opinion and speech, the right to a voice in the levying of taxes, the right to own property, equality before the law, and as we have seen equality of opportunity in access to government posts.

  • On the other hand, the Declaration is also explicable as an attack on the pre-Revolutionary monarchical regime;
  • These limits can only be determined by law;
  • A society in which the observance of the law is not assured, nor the separation of powers defined, has no constitution at all.

There was one crucial limitation: The male revolutionaries were largely hostile to the cause of women's suffrage, though women took part in some of the events of the Revolution and their cause was championed by such distinguished writers as Condorcet 1743—94one of the younger philosophes of the Enlightenment.

In 1793 women were to be expressly excluded from the rights of citizens.

French Revolution

In October 1789, absolute monarchy was formally abolished and replaced by constitutional monarchy. Click to view The Decree on the abolition of nobility.

  • On the other hand, the Declaration is also explicable as an attack on the pre-Revolutionary monarchical regime;
  • Click to view The Decree on the abolition of nobility;
  • In most cases, it was very likely that one would be convicted and sentenced, once suspected;
  • Women were finally given these rights with the adoption of the 1946 Constitution of the French Fourth Republic;
  • How far do you see in it the influence of the Enlightenment?
  • Those left out of the Declaration The declaration, as originally understood, recognized most rights as only belonging to males and did not give rights to women or abolish slavery.

Exercise 4 Now read the decree on the abolition of nobility aboveJune 1790. Do you notice any similarity with What is the Third Estate?

Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

In tone the decree echoes Sieyes's uncompromising egalitarian hostility towards noble privilege.