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Feminist elements in a rose for emily

The Marxist criticism theory allows one to understand that the material realities of he economy are the bases of social change and conflict.

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  • The old men change her past to suit their befuddled fantasies;
  • In the end of the story this situation comes up again.

This approach reveals that economic status is a primary element in this literary work as it structures the society in the story. According to the Marxist theory, each character represents a social class and many of the actions in the story stress where each of them stand.

In a small town of Jefferson, Miss Emily Grierson is a well-known woman. However, even though the lineage of Miss Emily Grierson had deep roots in the community, she was anything but a normal citizen. She continues to isolate herself from the world outside; the only interaction she has is with Homer Barron and her house keeper, Tobe.

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Throughout the whole story, the narrator depicts how the social classes interact with each other when the townspeople have subjective and distorted interpretations of Miss A Rose For Emily Marxist Theory We have so large base of authors that we can prepare a unique summary of any book.

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Feminist elements in A Rose for Emily?

We'll occasionally send you account related and promo emails. Emily whom they know little about. They see Miss Emily more as a spectacle than an actual human being trying to find happiness in life; they fail to sympathize with her. When the townspeople attend her funeral, the community depicts her as an unwanted and mysterious object they wish to explore more than a recently deceased person: The townspeople, but mostly the women attend her funeral purely to benefit their wn curiosity; it gave them an excuse to look around her house to see how Miss Emily had lived.

Feminism/ A Rose For Emily term paper 12057

Additionally, for most of the story, Emily is only seen from a distance, by people who watch her through the windows or who glimpse at her in her doorway. No one understands or knows the Emily that exists beyond what they can see.

  1. And even more because she has no money, she cannot be integrated into the development of the town. The newer generation recognizes no such category and decides she must pay her taxes.
  2. The room we see is dominated by a crayon portrait of Emily's long dead father on a tarnished gilt easel.
  3. The last two paragraphs of part four show great narrative sympathy for Emily.
  4. She never does quite what they expect. Is it possible she does not know he is dead?

They are only able to see her true self only after she dies and her secrets are revealed. Their lack of real compassion and false sincerity for Miss Emily and her knowledge of it was one of the factors that led to her alienation and, consequently, her inability to move forward in time.

  • Nicklaus Happel, for example, believes that the narrator is somewhat aloof from the town and that, in the course of his narrative, he shows sympathy for Emily to atone for past neglect;
  • They are really glad when they think Emily and Homer are married, because they want to be rid of her female cousins, but are sorry when there is no public party;
  • The room we see is dominated by a crayon portrait of Emily's long dead father on a tarnished gilt easel;
  • But how are we affected when she balloons into a drowned corpse?
  • Then the narrator points out the body that once lay in an attitude of embrace and describes it as victim of the same forces that outlast love;
  • Nicklaus Happel, for example, believes that the narrator is somewhat aloof from the town and that, in the course of his narrative, he shows sympathy for Emily to atone for past neglect.

She has to overcome her controlling father, a nosy town, and her own social awkwardness. And even more because she has no money, she cannot be integrated into the development of the town.

In "A Rose for Emily," what are some of the feminist elements?

In a community where social standards are constantly evolving brought on by the developing political and technological country, Miss Emily was left behind as she stayed in her southern tradition and culture. Need Help With Your Essay? The beliefs that the townspeople shared were very criticizing as they thought their dignity and value was in their image and reputation, and nstead of embracing Miss Emily as one of their own, they alienated her from their society by No 4 being critical and scrutinizing everything that she did.

  • The narrator, by introducing us so gently to her ghastly appearance, seems to have shown some sympathy for her, reinforcing the sympathy we already feel for what appears to be the helpless victim of powerful and careless forces;
  • Miss Emily's relatives show up and stay for a short while, but soon she has them packing and gone;
  • Knowing less than the narrator and no more than the town, how do we dare to guess at Emily's motives, given the examples of his restraint and the town's failure?
  • Throughout the story, Emily is depicted as a weak and dependent woman because of the way that she is treated by the town;
  • When the town sees her as the heroine-in-white of a melodramatic tableau in which her father threatens off suitors with his horsewhip, she is expected to do the kinds of things a melodramatic heroine usually does:

The Marxist theory allows one to understand that human beings become isolated by their families, by their community, by tradition, by law, by the past, and by their own actions and choices. No 5 Works Cited Faulkner, William. Literature of the United States, 5th Course. Holt Rinehart and Winston, 1993.