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Growth and development of trade union in nigeria

How Nigerian trade unions were born On 12: The twelfth part was published yesterday. The British colonialists did not set out to create wage labour in Nigeria.

Indeed nowhere in the world were deliberate steps taken to create wage labour, it was merely an inevitable by-product of a new age. As the feudal system gave way in Europe, new technology was developed which allowed for mass production of commodities. The steam engine was also discovered which helped production and mass transportation. With the Industrial Revolutiion in the 18th century, European production lines were hungry for raw materials while finished products needed to be pushed to other parts of the world since the European markets had become saturated.

Given the urgent need for raw materials and new markets, European governments and companies fanned out into the world smashing any local production system in their way and seizing territories by force of arms where the people refused to peacefully hand over their lands.

Th colonisers in sharing other peoples lands, adopted what they termed. The European countries sent armed gangs to subdue unco-operative Africans. After the invasion and seizure of Lagos in 1861, the colonialists had to set up an administrative structure. They had to employ some of the colonised people to serve this administration. This was the nucleus of what became the Nigerian public service.

With these events, some local people had to be employed. The churches with their strong ties to the colonial state, set up schools mainly as part of their evangelising mission.

They also needed a crop of teachers including local ones to run the schools. To ensure the quick and cheap transportation of raw materials from the Nigerian hinterland to the seaports enroute to Britain, the colonialists began the construction of the Railway at Iddo in 1898.

It was later to be extended to Ibadan, the centre where cocoa was being collected, to the north where tin, cotton, groundnut and hides and skin could be sourced, Enugu, the coal city and Port Harcourt another major seaport.

All these led to major recruitment of workers, and with it, the need to protect and defend their collective interests. How the Nigerian Trade Unions were born: More workers were added from the marine, the newly developed railway, teachers and of course commercial workers. Five years after this, an association of Civil Service Clerks in Lagos was established, followed in 1911 by a similar association in the commercial establishments. Popular support The meeting was convened by Mr.

Libert a Sierra Leonian who had been transferred from his country to Nigeria. A similar organisation had existed in Sierra Leone and Libert and some of the men who attended the meeting were conversant with the Growth and development of trade union in nigeria Leonian example.

Noted labour historian, Wogu Ananaba, wrote of this first union: Since the union was not known to have held any mass meetings during the period, it is even more difficult to determine how much popular support it commanded. Gilbert were among the most influential and highly respected members of the African Civil Service. President Goodluck Jonathan 2nd rightwith Labour leaders and Labour minister, Emeka Wogu left This fact, more than anything else, would seem to have won it recognition.

Its weakness lay in the fact that it was aristocratic to a fault. It did not just abhor strikes, but it lacked the courage even to make threats in furtherance of its demands. A salutary point that has to be made is that trade unions came into existence from 1912, some two decades before any law legalizing their existence. The British colonialists had feared that if unions were allowed to spring up, they would be catalysts in dismantling the colonial structure. They were not to be disappointed.

The following year the unions had increased to 41 with a total membership of 17,521. Its President was the popular Michael Imoudu while C. Enitan Brown was Secretary. In 1941, the situation was generally deteriorating for the British in their war against Germany, for the workers in their battles against ever rising cost of living, and for the nationalists, whose ranks were decimated by internal wranglings and splits.

On the political plane, there was a felt need for unity if the British were to be kicked out of the country. Its members included the charismatic, Nnamdi Azikiwe, M. Okorodudu, a lawyer and nationalist, I. Onajobi and the trade unionist E. The NRG concluded that unity was paramount, and in November 1943 a youth rally was organised at the instance of the Nigeria Union of Students a body founded in 1939 on the inspiration of the Rev. The students union was led by Olubunmi Thomas, P.

Malafa a Camerounian, and the noted journalist Anthony Enahoro. Alex Taylor at Oju Oloko, Lagos. Davis, Nnamdi Azikiwe, A. At the meeting, a resolution was adopted urging the formation of a National Front with the NYM Nigeria Youth Movement as spearhead and the students union was empowered to set the machinery to work.

In the trade union movement, a similar move for unity had been set afoot. The workers felt the need to unite based on the formidable colonial power they had to contend with. The colonialists had in its General Defence Regulations of 1941 virtually made strikes in any establishment an illegal act. The Labour Movement realised the need to fight this provision, but it was yet a fragmented group.

  1. The application of Group theory exposes the basis of the state polytechnic in the pursuit of public sector organizational growth.
  2. Popular support The meeting was convened by Mr. The major difference between the craft and professional trade association has what is today known as trade Union is that trade associations were formed for the benefit of workers inform of lending money to workers an dexchange of tools.
  3. Libert a Sierra Leonian who had been transferred from his country to Nigeria. Malafa a Camerounian, and the noted journalist Anthony Enahoro.

There was therefore no central organisation to call all trade unions together. The concerned unionists including M. Shonekan sought the assistance of the noted journalist Ernest Ikoli. Apart from discussing the irmmediate danger of the Regulation, the meeting decided to establish a labour centre that would address issues of joint concern to all the unions.

  1. Education of union members has significant positive impact on the performance of staff as well as organization growth. On the political plane, there was a felt need for unity if the British were to be kicked out of the country.
  2. A similar organisation had existed in Sierra Leone and Libert and some of the men who attended the meeting were conversant with the Sierra Leonian example.
  3. Malafa a Camerounian, and the noted journalist Anthony Enahoro. It was later to be extended to Ibadan, the centre where cocoa was being collected, to the north where tin, cotton, groundnut and hides and skin could be sourced, Enugu, the coal city and Port Harcourt another major seaport.
  4. A similar organisation had existed in Sierra Leone and Libert and some of the men who attended the meeting were conversant with the Sierra Leonian example. Since the union was not known to have held any mass meetings during the period, it is even more difficult to determine how much popular support it commanded.
  5. President Goodluck Jonathan 2nd right , with Labour leaders and Labour minister, Emeka Wogu left This fact, more than anything else, would seem to have won it recognition.

Private sector workers A committee to help implement this was set up. Finally on November 23, 1942, 23 unions met. The new body passed a resolution which was a signed by the Presidents and Secretaries of the unions affiliated to the FTUN.

How Nigerian trade unions were born

It said that trade unions in Nigeria are interested in the Regulations, measures and legislation made under the on-going war and therefore asked the colonial government to consult them on such issues. A provisional executive with T. Bankole as president and M. Tokunboh as secretary was put in place. Ernest Ikoli and H. Tokunboh who was secretary to that historic conference said of its significance and historic nature: Two hundred delegates representing 56 trade unions from all parts of the country attended the conference which demonstrated the unity and vitality that qualified the labour movement as a factor to be reckoned with in the affairs of the country.

A Tokunboh the Secretary General. Others aims were the establishment of a workers newspaper, building of a trade union secretariat, establishment of a Nigeria Labour College and procurement of scholarships for trade unionists to study abroad.