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Has genocide ever been practiced or condoned in the united states

Old Testament[ edit ] The Old Testament openly portrayed and condoned the genocide and massacre of Canaanites Numbers 21: Thomas Aquinas[ edit ] With regard to heretics two points must be observed: On their own side there is the sin, whereby they deserve not only to be separated from the Church by excommunication, but also to be severed from the world by death.

For it is a much graver matter to corrupt the faith that quickens the soul, than to forge money, which supports temporal life. Wherefore if forgers of money and other evil-doers are forthwith condemned to death by the secular authority, much more reason is there for heretics, as soon as they are convicted of heresy, to be not only excommunicated but even put to death.

Death toll of Christianity

On the part of the Church, however, there is mercy, which looks to the conversion of the wanderer, wherefore she condemns not at once, but "after the first and second admonition", as the Apostle directs: Lauded Catholic philosopher Thomas Aquinas openly advocated and defended the extermination of heretics, and believed witches were real which was a justification used by fanatics to kill them.

Aletheia gave a deth toll of 56 million [6] Let us look for a moment at the number of victims sacrificed on the altars of the Christian Moloch: In Spain 5,000,000 perished during the eight Crusades; 2,000,000 of Saxons and Scandinavians lost their lives in opposing the introduction of the blessings of Christianity.

Wars against the Netherlands, Albigenses, Waldenses, and Huguenots. This figure has been criticized by self proclaimed "atrocitologist" and author of Atrocitology: Humanity's 100 Deadliest Achievements, Matthew White.

Some events don't answer the question neatly, so in these cases, the statement would be counted as half applicable: It's a simple question of what did they call themselves. Even if his faith appears to be purely nominal, the fact that a leader finds it expedient to go through the motions of being a Christian tells a lot about who his supporters are.

  1. If a nation that only recently converted to Christianity like, say, Rwanda is excused or blamed for misdeeds, then a nation that only recently converted away from Christianity like, say the USSR should be equally excused or blamed. Sometimes, the Franciscans allowed neophytes to escape the missions, or they would allow them to visit their home village.
  2. Wherefore if forgers of money and other evil-doers are forthwith condemned to death by the secular authority, much more reason is there for heretics, as soon as they are convicted of heresy, to be not only excommunicated but even put to death. For it is a much graver matter to corrupt the faith that quickens the soul, than to forge money, which supports temporal life.
  3. On the road they did the same with those of the lodge at San Jose.
  4. How deep were the roots of Christianity?
  5. He excluded other notably deadly events such as the aforementioned elimination of Waldensians which caused 900,000 to 2 million deaths , the French Wars of Religion.

Were the perps from a traditionally Christian society? How deep were the roots of Christianity? Too shallow to have much effect, or so deep that people behaved as Christians, regardless of what the ruling class dictated?

And this is a question that cuts both ways. If a nation that only recently converted to Christianity like, say, Rwanda is excused or blamed for misdeeds, then a nation that only recently converted away from Christianity like, say the USSR should be equally excused or blamed.

Was the Christianity mainstream? Did the perps practice a Christianity that was recognizably similar to the Christianity practiced all around the world and across time? Was it dangerously close to some type of Christianity that people believe today? Or was it some weird heresy that we can hardly blame on JesusPaulAugustineLutheretc?

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Was the conflict mostly religious? Granted, no conflict is ever entirely religious or entirely anything in motivation, but was the degree of religious motivation a lot higher than usual? For example, if the only difference between the two conflicting groups is religion, then it probably should be categorized as a religious conflict.

Was the conflict partly religious? Was religion among the top motivations at all? Also, if you answer yes to question 4 then answer yes here as well. After all, you can't get to mostly without passing through partly. Estimates using White's standards[ edit ] Using this standard, White cites the following events as scoring at least 4 on this scale: Other sects, such as the Waldensian, were subject to the same extermination policy if not a worse onein which possibly 900,000 [13] to 2 million were killed.

The most notable case of this was the Spanish missions in California in which California Indians had to labor and worship at the mission under the strict observance of the priests and overseers, who herded them to daily masses and labors.

If an Indian did not report for their duties for a period of a few days, they were searched for, and if it was discovered that they had left without permission, they were considered runaways.

  • The consequence was, first, the women consented to the rite and received it, for the love they bore their children; and finally the males gave way for the purpose of enjoying once more the society of wife and family;
  • On arriving home the men were instructed to throw their bows and arrows at the feet of the priest, and make due submission;
  • Wherefore if forgers of money and other evil-doers are forthwith condemned to death by the secular authority, much more reason is there for heretics, as soon as they are convicted of heresy, to be not only excommunicated but even put to death;
  • The most notable case of this was the Spanish missions in California in which California Indians had to labor and worship at the mission under the strict observance of the priests and overseers, who herded them to daily masses and labors.

Large-scale military expeditions were organized to round up the escaped neophytes. Sometimes, the Franciscans allowed neophytes to escape the missions, or they would allow them to visit their home village. However, the Franciscans would only allow this so that they could secretly follow the neophytes. Upon arriving to the village and capturing the runaways, they would take back Indians to the missions, sometimes as many as 200 to 300 Indians.

On the road they did the same with those of the lodge at San Jose. On arriving home the men were instructed to throw their bows and arrows at the feet of the priest, and make due submission. The infants were then baptized, as were also all children under eight years of age; the former were left with their mothers, but the latter kept apart from all communication with their parents. The consequence was, first, the women consented to the rite and received it, for the love they bore their children; and finally the males gave way for the purpose of enjoying once more the society of wife and family.

Marriage was then performed, and so this contaminated race, in their own sight and that of their kindred, became followers of Christ A total of 20,355 natives were "attached" to the California missions in 1806 the highest figure recorded during in the Mission Period ; under Mexican rule the number rose to 21,066 in 1824, the record year during the entire era of the Franciscan missions. Two epidemics of measles, one in 1806 and the other in 1828, caused many deaths.

The mortality rates were so high that the missions were constantly dependent upon new conversions. Despite being affected before the introduction of missions, the buildings allowed rodents to infiltrate living areas and spread disease more rapidly.

Many natives were living in cramped spaces with poor hygiene and poor nutrition. This led not only to high mortality rate, but to low fertility rates as well. It is estimated that every 20 years or so, a new epidemic would wipe out the adult population of natives in many missions, giving no chance for recovery. Newson, 2005 In total 60,000 [21] to 100,000 [22] Indians perished under the Mission system.

On that note Catholics will often point to the low death toll of the Portuguese 1,846 [23] and Spanish 3,000 to 5,000 [24] inquisitions as an example of the banality of Christian extremism compared to atheist examples, however you consider some of those killed in the Spanish Inquisition such as Nicolas de Aguilar as Alcalde Mayor where those trying to regulate and control the abuses of Franciscan missionaries [25] the number of tertiary deaths from the repression may be much higher.

Using this revised estimate for the Spanish Conquest, Catholic Missions, plus aforementioned inquisitions, the total death toll of Christianity is, at least, between 13.

He excluded other notably deadly events such as the aforementioned elimination of Waldensians which caused 900,000 to 2 million deathsthe French Wars of Religion.