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Money and happiness in richard cory by edwin arlington robinson

I was out of the classroom that day to plan a department in-service training, and when I returned, the substitute said that they had a hard time with it.

How I wish I had remembered that I had an analysis paper for this poem in the dusty piles of old college papers. I could have left it with them. Here it is with a updates, revisions, and lesson plan ideas. Using Robinson's Poem in the Classroom This poem has been one of my all-time favorites since I read it in high school. It is one of those poems that spoke to me and stuck with me over the years. It stays with me, because it is relevant, shocking, and speaks to a truth about the human condition.

Even though it was published in 1897, it could have been published yesterday.

As a society we are still placing wealthy people on a pedestal. Our society today has a seemingly unhealthy fascination with celebrities and people who have status and wealth.

  1. In the end though, they learn a valuable life lesson.
  2. There are many other royal connotations and images in this poem including.
  3. Then, Richard Cory unexpectedly killed himself. Richard Cory was a rich, well- educated man.

For that reason, I believe this is a great choice for teachers to use in their classrooms. Ask students to write a paraphrase of the poem.

  • Then, Richard Cory unexpectedly killed himself;
  • As a society we are still placing wealthy people on a pedestal.

To paraphrase, students should rewrite the poem in their own words to show that they understand the basic meaning of the poem.

What is he saying? When Richard Cory came into our lower class neighborhood, everyone stood aside and watched him. He was a complete gentleman, inside and out. He dressed neatly and conservatively. Even though he spoke to us on our level, people got excited when he spoke to them.

He was very, very rich. He was educated and proper. In short, we held him on top of a pedestal, and dreamed of being up there with him.

We worked hard, sacrificing and striving for a position next to him. Then, Richard Cory unexpectedly killed himself.

  • Richard Cory is a representation of wealth, status and privilege;
  • Using Robinson's Poem in the Classroom This poem has been one of my all-time favorites since I read it in high school.

The people of the town, who are clearly of a lower financial class, place Richard Cory on a pedestal. They look up to him and want to be just like him. In the end though, they learn a valuable life lesson. Robinson uses connotation extensively to place Richard Cory high on a pedestal above the townspeople. Connotation is the use of words to suggest meanings beyond the dictionary definition. Robinson positions the characters to show the differences in their financial status.

He also shows that it is the townspeople, and not Cory, that seem to define these positions. Robinson's Poetry Buy Now Although it is written by an American poet and set in an American town, connotation is used to suggest a noble, royal image of Richard Cory. His name, Richard, is the name of many kings. There are many other royal connotations and images in this poem including: Robinson uses denotation, or the use of words for the exact meaning to emphasize this image of Richard Cory being local royalty.

Richard Cory by Edwin Arlington Robinson - An Analysis with Lesson Plan Ideas

Richard Cory was a rich, well- educated man. On the outside, Richard Cory is a perfect man. Robinson uses metaphors to create a noble image of Richard Cory as well. A metaphor makes a descriptive comparison between two objects or ideas. Richard Cory is a representation of wealth, status and privilege.

  • He dressed neatly and conservatively;
  • When Richard Cory came into our lower class neighborhood, everyone stood aside and watched him;
  • There are many other royal connotations and images in this poem including:

Literary Terms All of the following literary terms and devices are elements present in this poem. You can use this poem to teach or review any or all of these literary techniques.