Homeworks academic service


The arrow of time by k c cole

The Hole in the Universe

She studied political science at Barnard Collegewhere she received her B. In 1968, she traveled to Eastern Europe, living in Czechoslovakia just one year after the Warsaw Pact invasion.

After living for several years in Eastern Europe, Cole moved back to the United States to San Francisco, where she took a position at the Saturday Review as an editor and writer.

In the late 1970s, she also worked as an editor and writer for Newsday, where she wrote on subjects from politics to travel, women's issues, and education.

And in 1982, Doubleday published her book, Between the Lines: Both books were well-received with a write-up in TIME Magazine for the former and a series of articles published in The Milwaukee Journal concerning the latter. Cole has two children: Science writing[ edit ] Frank Oppenheimer and the Exploratorium[ edit ] While living and writing in San Francisco, Cole was handed a magazine assignment to write about the Exploratoriuman innovative science museum.

At the time, she had no interest in studying science, but her experience with the Exploratorium changed that. She avidly pursued an independent study of physics with the help of the Exploratorium staff, and developed a friendship with the Exploratorium's founder and the "uncle of the atomic bomb", Frank Oppenheimerwho became her mentor.

  • There is something rather than nothing because there is no such thing as nothing;
  • Cole delves into the deepest ideas with a profound sense of wonder and lyricism that borders on poetry at times;
  • One noted critic of her writing is physicist Peter Woit.

Her experiences with Oppenheimer and the Exploratorium inspired her to pursue science writing. Journalism[ edit ] Cole first wrote about science themes for the New York Times both in a column series called "Hers" and individual magazine features.

Welcome to Fitz's On The Lake - Along the Shores of Lake Wisconsin

Focusing primarily on physics and math, she went on to write a science column for the Washington Post magazine, and her science articles have appeared in the Esquire, The Smithsonian, Lear's, The New Yorker, The Columbia Journalism Review, and other publications. One noted critic of her writing is physicist Peter Woit.

  • Cole delves into the deepest ideas with a profound sense of wonder and lyricism that borders on poetry at times;
  • Let me share some impressions;
  • Journalism[ edit ] Cole first wrote about science themes for the New York Times both in a column series called "Hers" and individual magazine features.

In 1985, Bantam published Sympathetic Vibrations: The Mathematics of Truth and Beauty, a national bestseller that has been translated into twelve languages. In 2001, Mariner published The Hole in the Universe: In 2009, she published a book about her friend, mentor, and colleague Frank Oppenheimer called Something Incredibly Wonderful Happens: Radio commentaries[ edit ] Cole is a frequent radio commentator.

  • What I learned was just how difficult the subject really is, and how far removed it is from our common sense notions about the world;
  • In the late 1970s, she also worked as an editor and writer for Newsday, where she wrote on subjects from politics to travel, women's issues, and education;
  • One noted critic of her writing is physicist Peter Woit;
  • There are several chemotherapeutic drugs available in the market;
  • At the time, she had no interest in studying science, but her experience with the Exploratorium changed that.

Art and science[ edit ] In keeping with the spirit of the Exploratorium in San Francisco, Cole engages in exploring connections between art, science, politics, etc.