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The curious incident of the dog in the night time compare and contrast

Book vs stage: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Wellington Mrs Shears' large black poodle, which Christopher finds dead in her garden, with a garden fork sticking out of him. I suppose you'd call it high-function autism in that he can function on, you know, a day-to-day basis, in a kind of rudimentary way.

But he has a serious difficulty with life in that he really doesn't empathize with other human beings. He can't read their faces. He can't put himself in their shoes. And he can't understand anything more than the literal meaning of whatever's said to him, although I'm very careful in the book not to actually use the word 'Asperger's' or 'autism.

Because I don't want him to be labelled, and because, as with most people who have a disability, I don't think it's necessarily the most important thing about him.

And as a good friend of mine said after reading the book, a friend who is himself a mathematician, it's not a novel about a boy who has Asperger's syndrome; it's a novel about a young mathematician who has some strange behavioural problems. And I think that's right.

I gave him kind of nine or 10 rules that he would live his life by, and then I didn't read any more about Asperger's because I think there is no typical person who has Asperger's syndrome, and they're as large and diverse a group of people as any other group in society.

And the important thing is that I did a lot of imagining, that I did a lot of putting myself into his shoes in trying to make him come alive as a human being rather than getting him right, whatever that might mean. According to Haddon, none of these people can be labelled as having a disability. Haddon added that he "slightly regret[s]" that the term Asperger's syndrome appeared on the cover of his novel.

The reader in this instance acts as ethnographer, invited to see what Mark Osteen claims is a 'quality in autistic lives that is valuable in and of itself' cited in [S. Along similar lines, [Alex] McClimens writes that Haddon's novel is 'an ethnographic delight' and that 'Haddon's achievement is to have written a novel that turns on the central character's difference without making that difference a stigmatising characteristic' 2005, p.

Just the facts, ma'am

The narrative also bristles with diagrams, maps, drawings, stories, texts that inform Christopher's lexicon for mapping meaning in a world of bewildering signs and sounds. But it also provides profound insight into a disorder—autism—that leaves those who have it struggling to perceive even the most basic of human emotions.

In so doing, The Curious Incident leaves its readers with a greater appreciation of their own ability to feel, express, and interpret emotions. This mainstream literary success made its way to the top of the New York Times bestseller list for fiction at the same time it was being touted by experts in Asperger's syndrome and autism-spectrum disorder as an unrivaled fictional depiction of the inner workings of an autistic teenage boy.

He gives as an example a quote that he found in "a proper novel": I cannot contract into the firm fist which those clench who do not depend on stimulus. An author whom I love actually, but who sometimes got a little too carried away.

  1. Christopher has Asperger's syndrome, though this is never specified.
  2. On 19 December 2013, during a performance of The Curious Incident at the Apollo, parts of the ceiling fell down injuring around 80 of the over 700 patrons inside. Both boys have specific things that they like to do in times of need.
  3. State Library of Victoria. But The Curious Incident is no out-of-Eden fable.
  4. Mark Haddon has created a true literary character and his handling of the teenage Asperger's heroic adventure is brilliantly crafted.

He shows us the way consciousness orders the world, even when the world doesn't want to be ordered," adding that "the great achievement of this novel is that it transcends its obvious cleverness.

It's more than an exercise in narrative ingenuity.

  1. State Library of Victoria. Their interests are prescribed, their experiences static, their interaction with others limited.
  2. Buy The Curious Incident at Amazon. So persuasive and so effective is the construction of Christopher, not only is he a character you're rooting for, he's also the character in the story you understand the best.
  3. He knows "all the countries of the world and their capital cities and every prime number up to 7,507".

Filled with humor and pain, it verges on profundity in its examination of those things—customs, habits, language, symbols, daily routines, etc. This book is also required reading for those who simply enjoy a fascinating story. Mark Haddon has created a true literary character and his handling of the teenage Asperger's heroic adventure is brilliantly crafted. He uses the literal mind-set of his hero to mask the true direction of the plot. The actual use of language is somewhat austere—an unavoidable consequence of having a boy with autism as a narrator—but it has its own beauty, and it works.

So persuasive and so effective is the construction of Christopher, not only is he a character you're rooting for, he's also the character in the story you understand the best.

It's startling how believably and comfortably this story puts you into what you might have thought were likely to be some pretty alien shoes. Instead of becoming the focus of the plot, the autism enhances it. The unemotional descriptions amplify many moments of observational comedy, and misfortunes are made extremely poignantly. Kimball Brizendine, the Mayor of Friendswoodissued a proclamation declaring "Galveston County Reads Day" and encouraging "all citizens, teens to seniors" to read the novel.

Five days later, he retracted the statement, declaring that it was "not [his] intention to endorse this readership [sic] for our younger readers. Clearly, these are not ideas we should promote to kids'. On 19 December 2013, during a performance of The Curious Incident at the Apollo, parts of the ceiling fell down injuring around 80 of the over 700 patrons inside.

Archived from the original PDF on 9 October 2007. Retrieved 21 November 2010. State Library of Victoria. Archived from the original on 27 March 2011. Retrieved 28 May 2013.