Homeworks academic service


The effect of legislation and policy on person centred practice

Share via Email People with learning disabilities are still not being including in decisions about their care. Murdo Macleod Based on its review of services for people with learning disabilities, a recent Care Quality Commission CQC report indicated that many care homes and hospitals are still failing to provide patient-centred care.

Plenty of information and tools are available to support organisations and services to ensure the best possible outcomes for people with learning disabilities and for ensuring they are included in decision about their care. But there is a gulf between the rhetoric and policy around person-centred approaches and actual care delivery on the ground.

A more person-centred approach to care

Being involved in their own care decisions also empowers people with learning disabilities as decisions are not done to them but made with them. But there are failures in using this approach, which is not only a violation of a person's rights under the Human Rights Act and the Equality Act, but an approach that has been set out in various policy and legislative frameworks, including Valuing People Now 2009 and the Mental Capacity Act to name but a few.

  1. But there is a gulf between the rhetoric and policy around person-centred approaches and actual care delivery on the ground.
  2. Hire Writer Discuss the service users strengths and make the most of them Communicate as well as you can at all times and always explain what you are doing and why you are doing it Always make the service users feel included at all times Help the service user do as much as they can for themselves supporting independence Common mistakes that care workers and other professionals often make, at times without realising are the following. Instead, there should be a local citizen-led service in addition to the CQC model, which might help to bring local people closer to those who need support.
  3. Statutory duties Health and Social Care Act 2012 requires Clinical Commissioning Groups to promote the involvement of each patient Care Act 2014 requires local authorities to involve adults in their assessment, care and support planning and review Integrated care licence condition applies to licensed providers of NHS-funded services, including person-centred delivery and engagement CQC.

Our evaluation of Mencap's involve me project last year also found that people with profound and multiple learning disabilities are able to express preferences and decisions that affect them personally. One of the ways to ensure this is for people to be supported to communicate in a way that best suits them. This could be through the use of gestures, facial expressions, sounds, sense of smell or photos.

  1. For example we have a service user who has learning disabilities; the regular care worker for this service user would always choose the clothes for this particular service user without asking the service user what they would like to wear. Any actions taken in respect of the individual without capacity should be the least restrictive in terms of their basic rights and freedoms.
  2. Being involved in their own care decisions also empowers people with learning disabilities as decisions are not done to them but made with them.
  3. At times, due to preventing service users causing any potential harm to themselves, for their best interest certain aspects and choices are made for them. This was evidently frustrating the service user, therefore i asked the care worker to always give options, by taking out several outfits and allowing the service user to make a decision on the day to day activities.

While there has been some progress over recent years looking at creative ways of enhancing communication, services need to prioritise this to guarantee that the person is at the centre of their service delivery.

Other problems include family inclusion in decision making.

  • Frequently asked questions What does person centred care look like?
  • It is assumed that individuals have capacity unless an assessment has taken place that determines otherwise.

People with learning disabilities can be in contact with many professionals during their lives, but it is their family who has had the most continuous relationship with them but families can be seen as outsiders and we need to see a shift in this attitude. But caring for those with learning disabilities is not the only issue. There are also some fundamental flaws in the current model of regulation by the CQC; a national organisation overseeing the quality of people with learning disabilities' lives on an irregular basis won't work.

Lead person centred practice Essay

Instead, there should be a local citizen-led service in addition to the CQC model, which might help to bring local people closer to those who need support. One example of this type of service is our quality checking project, commissioned by Kingston council, which involves local people with learning disabilities carrying out checks on the services provided.

  • But even though at times decisions may be made for service users because they lack the capacity to make some important ones, it should never be assumed that that are unable to make any decisions;
  • One example of this type of service is our quality checking project, commissioned by Kingston council, which involves local people with learning disabilities carrying out checks on the services provided;
  • Being involved in their own care decisions also empowers people with learning disabilities as decisions are not done to them but made with them;
  • I went to spot check a morning visit and found that although the relationship between the service user and carer was very good the care worker lacked in supporting choice and control;
  • This was evidently frustrating the service user, therefore i asked the care worker to always give options, by taking out several outfits and allowing the service user to make a decision on the day to day activities.

The new health and wellbeing boards will need to ensure that people with learning disabilities get bespoke support to meet their complex needs. If we are to see a real change and significant improvement in the delivery of effective care, there needs to be a stronger requirement for services to deliver person-centred approaches in line with professor Jim Mansell's reports in 2007 and 2010.

This should involve the appropriate training and support for health and social care staff, and disability services must be held accountable to people with learning disabilities, their families and commissioners.

Join the social care network to receive regular emails and exclusive offers.