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The purpose of the house of stilts

Stilt houses in all their tall beauty Kieran Timberlake Associates Stilt houses have been around for generations. Traditionally built to protect homes against flooding, a number of creative architects have taken to these leggy constructions, attracted by the unconventional design and incredible views offered by raising a home off the ground.

  1. Constructed using a combination of untreated cedar wood and steel beam supports, the materials will weather and corrode over time blending the house into its surrounding environment.
  2. Loblolly House, Maryland, USA Kieran Timberlake Associates This house on stilts was designed with the aim of fully integrating a contemporary structure into the natural environment. Traditionally built to protect homes against flooding, a number of creative architects have taken to these leggy constructions, attracted by the unconventional design and incredible views offered by raising a home off the ground.
  3. Casa Flotanta, Santa Teresa, Costa Rica Benjamin Garcia Saxe Architecture The house is made up of a series of prefabricated units connected by flying bridges that sit high above the landscape. By Charlie Sorrel 2 minute Read A house that rises up on stilts to escape flooding seems like a fine idea.
  4. This was to avoid wild animals and floods, to deter thieves, and for added ventilation. Tinbeerwah House, Queensland, Australia Bark Architects Bark Architects have built a house that creates a harmonious flow between indoor and outdoor spaces.
  5. Traditionally built to protect homes against flooding, a number of creative architects have taken to these leggy constructions, attracted by the unconventional design and incredible views offered by raising a home off the ground.

Houses on stilts are experiencing a revival Cargo Collective Stilt houses have been around for generations. Hillside house, Brisbane, Australia Tato Architects Tato Architects had sensible planning in mind when they designed this house on stilts. Based on traditional Australian Queenslander architecture, the hillside property was elevated using stilts to make use of the steeply sloped the purpose of the house of stilts, while benefiting from hillside views.

Hillside house, Brisbane, Australia Tato Architects By incorporating a system of exposed I-beams into the framework of the structure, architects were able to create a sheltered veranda entrance that doubles up as an office and guest bathroom.

Sliding glass doors connect interior and exterior spaces. Hillside house, Brisbane, Australia Tato Architects The interior has been kept minimalist and uncluttered. Elevated tower house, Cape Town, South Africa Malan Vorster Designed by South African architecture studio Malan Vorster, this house was purposefully built on a steep slope to provide its inhabitants with picturesque views above a forest tree line.

Elevated tower house, Cape Town, South Africa Malan Vorster The property is made up of four cylindrical towers offering 360 degree views inside the building. Each cylinder is reserved for its own unique function, whether that be a living room, kitchen or dining alcove. Constructed using a combination of untreated cedar wood and steel beam supports, the materials will weather and corrode over time blending the house into its surrounding environment.

Elevated tower house, Cape Town, South Africa Malan Vorster Inhabitants can experience breathtaking morning views from the raised master bedroom. Enclosed by a glass balustrade, the space was designed as a lookout platform for unprecedented views of the landscape below.

A modern interpretation of the classic vaulted ceiling creates an intimate sleeping environment, while minimalist furnishings showcase mastery in contemporary interior design. Supported by six steel columns set into the side of a natural rock formation, the cabin appears to float amongst the trees.

The Rise of the Stilt House

Wooden floor planks that extend out onto a suspended exterior deck create a sense of seamless transition from interior to exterior space. House on Ikema Island, Okinawa, Japan 1100 Architect 1100 Architects raised this beach house on a concrete plinth and stilts so that inhabitants can appreciate views of the East China Sea. The main living space is located on an elevated level, while the ground level has been reserved for a private entry, car park and sheltered outdoor terrace.

House on Ikema Island, Okinawa, Japan 1100 Architect The property consists of two bathrooms, two bedrooms, an open-plan kitchen, living and dining room, and two traditional tatami rooms. The decor is minimalist, with Japanese cypress and concrete used as the main building materials.

House on Ikema Island, Okinawa, Japan 1100 Architect Sliding doors give access to a large terrace and deck that extends out onto a luxury swimming pool. A small set of steps leads down to a private beach entrance. Impact resistant glazing protects the house from typhoons and storms. Clad in silvertop ash, which will age over time and blend in with the surrounding trees. Great Ocean Road house, Victoria, Australia ITN Architects The property consists of two pavilions positioned at right angles, one for its owners and another for guests.

Positioning the house this way exposes all major rooms to unobstructed views the purpose of the house of stilts the ocean. Great Ocean Road house, Victoria, Australia ITN Architects Simple building materials and a minimalist interior were chosen as not to take focus away from the breathtaking ocean views.

Stilts (architecture)

Villa Kogelhof, Noord-Beveland, Netherlands Paul de Ruiter Architects Designed by award winning Dutch architect Paul de Ruiter, Villa Kogelhof is an energy-efficient house that is partly raised on stilts and partly submerged beneath a pool of water. With an exterior composed of corroding steel, the cabin sits unobtrusively amongst the trees, creating minimal impact on the surrounding landscape. Four shutters on pivots allow the property to be closed off from the outside world when its owners are away.

Loblolly House, Maryland, USA Kieran Timberlake Associates This house on stilts was designed with the aim of fully integrating a contemporary structure into the natural environment. The facade of the box-like house consists of an aluminium frame, wood cladding and contracting acrylic shutters. Its stilts were designed to imitate the trunks of the surrounding pine trees.

  • Elevated tower house, Cape Town, South Africa Malan Vorster Designed by South African architecture studio Malan Vorster, this house was purposefully built on a steep slope to provide its inhabitants with picturesque views above a forest tree line;
  • Designed to make the most of its beachfront location, the property is surrounded with floor-to-ceiling windows that provide views of the nearby ocean;
  • Constructed using a combination of untreated cedar wood and steel beam supports, the materials will weather and corrode over time blending the house into its surrounding environment;
  • Traditionally built to protect homes against flooding, a number of creative architects have taken to these leggy constructions, attracted by the unconventional design and incredible views offered by raising a home off the ground;
  • The length of stilts may vary widely; stilts of traditional houses can be measured half meter to 5 or 6 meters.

Folding doors and a contracting shutter system allow ventilation to circulate the property while providing panoramic views of the bay. Loblolly House, Maryland, USA Kieran Timberlake Associates Spectacular sunrises can be seen from the master bedroom, which has been fitted with folding doors and shutters. An additional sheltered balcony to the right of the bedroom allows inhabitants to experience the splendours of the surroundings without having to step outside.

The 807 square foot home is made up of two volumes connected by a walkway that also functions as a spacious terrace. The chic, contemporary home is anchored to the site by a centrally placed brick chimney that also serves as a wood-burning stove.

Designers chose to use glass as the main surface material so as not to obstruct views of the nearby River Loddon. Choosing to build a house on stilts also allows its owners to expand into the ground level over time.

Toda House, Hiroshima, Japan Cargo Collective An exterior spiralling walkway the purpose of the house of stilts fresh air and wind to ventilate the property and the courtyard, creating a natural home for a blossoming garden.

Positioned 60 metres above a lake, the house is fully supported on thin stilts and connected via a timber passageway that has been rooted into an adjacent hillside.

Matching wood panel ceilings and floors connect the interior design scheme with the exterior environment. Tiny home on stilts, Dorset, UK Nozomi Nakabayashi Japanese architect Nozomi Nakabayashi designed this timber house on stilts for a client who sought a quiet weekend retreat with a view. Taking the environment into consideration, the architect chose to construct the house almost completely out of locally sourced wood and reclaimed materials.

Tiny home on stilts, Dorset, UK Nozomi Nakabayashi The hut is compact and functional consisting of a fold out bed that transforms into a seating area when closed.

A single wood burning stove is used to heat up the structure. A vaulted ceiling with exposed beams creates an illusion of space that the 86 square foot structure otherwise lacks. In order to experience views of the nearby ocean while remaining connected to the forested landscape, its owners chose to elevate their home above an otherwise uninhabitable hilly terrain.

  1. Villa Kogelhof, Noord-Beveland, Netherlands Paul de Ruiter Architects Designed by award winning Dutch architect Paul de Ruiter, Villa Kogelhof is an energy-efficient house that is partly raised on stilts and partly submerged beneath a pool of water.
  2. Positioning the house this way exposes all major rooms to unobstructed views of the ocean.
  3. By Charlie Sorrel 2 minute Read A house that rises up on stilts to escape flooding seems like a fine idea.
  4. Elevated tower house, Cape Town, South Africa Malan Vorster Inhabitants can experience breathtaking morning views from the raised master bedroom. House on Ikema Island, Okinawa, Japan 1100 Architect Sliding doors give access to a large terrace and deck that extends out onto a luxury swimming pool.

Casa Flotanta, Santa Teresa, Costa Rica Benjamin Garcia Saxe Architecture The house is made up of a series of prefabricated units connected by flying bridges that sit high above the landscape.

Taking height restrictions and a maximum lot of 2,500 square foot into consideration, the property was raised on stilts to allow space for a carport and private entrance. Beach Haven residence, New Jersey, USA Spectra Architects Considering extreme local weather conditions, architects built the house with a fibreglass roof, hurricane-grade windows and steel components.

Designed to make the most of its beachfront location, the property is surrounded with floor-to-ceiling windows that provide views of the nearby ocean. The ocean-facing master bedroom features a cosy fireplace, ensuite bathroom and its own private balcony for drinking in the views as the sun rises. The simple wooden structure is the purpose of the house of stilts on large stilts of Aleppo pine, which are anchored to a series of rocks beneath it. A wraparound wooden deck accessed by sliding glass doors allows inhabitants to experience panoramic views of the coastline.

Tinbeerwah House, Queensland, Australia Bark Architects Bark Architects have built a house that creates a harmonious flow between indoor and outdoor spaces.

Supported on stilts fused to the side of a steep hill, the transparent structure appears to float above a eucalyptus forest, providing its inhabitants with picturesque views of the natural landscape. Tinbeerwah House, Queensland, Australia Bark Architects Taking the environment into consideration, architects designed the house with large windows and fold-out doors and predominantly open-plan spaces to create a harmonious flow through the space.