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What are the advantages of quantitative research

Qualitative Studies

Missteps at the onset of the research process may derail an otherwise promising study. Knowing the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative and qualitative methods will help you make a better decision.

Both methods are quite useful depending on the type of study. Some dissertations and research studies take a mixed method approach, which incorporates qualitative and quantitative methods in different phases to obtain a broader perspective. Quantitative Advantages You may be very familiar with quantitative research from your science classes where you learned and practiced using the scientific method. A problem or question is examined by deductively forming a hypothesis derived from theory.

Controlled, objective testing and experimentation ultimately supports or rejects your hypotheses.

Qualitative Research

Each step is standardized to reduce bias when collecting and analyzing data. A big advantage of this approach is that the results are valid, reliable and generalizable to a larger population.

Quantitative research is advantageous for studies that involve numbers, such as measuring achievement gaps between different groups of students or assessing the effectiveness of a new blood pressure medication.

Advantages & Disadvantages of Qualitative & Quantitative Research

Quantitative Disadvantages While quantitative research methods work well in the laboratory under tightly controlled conditions, measuring phenomena like human behavior in natural settings is trickier.

Survey instruments are vulnerable to errors such as mistakes in measurement and flawed sampling techniques. Another disadvantage is that quantitative research involves numbers, but some topics are too difficult to quantify in numbers.

  1. Because of the subjective nature of qualitative data and its origin in single contexts, it is difficult to apply conventional standards of reliability and validity. Useful for testing and validating already constructed theories.
  2. Each of these approaches has strengths and weaknesses, and each can benefit from our combining them with one another. The contexts of inquiry are not contrived; they are natural.
  3. Qualitative Studies Qualitative research studies can provide you with details about human behavior, emotion, and personality characteristics that quantitative studies cannot match.
  4. Qualitative Disadvantages Qualitative studies often take more time to complete due to the pain staking nature of gathering and analyzing field notes, transcribing interviews, identifying themes and studying photographs, for instance. However, it is possible to increase sample sizes to a point where statistical significance is barely meaningful.

For example, constructing an effective survey with closed-ended questions about how people fall in love would be difficult. Qualitative Advantages Qualitative research is often used to conduct social and behavioral studies because human interactions are more complex than molecular reactions in a beaker.

Subjectivity, nonrandom sampling and small sample size distinguishes qualitative research from quantitative research. A big advantage of qualitative research is the ability to deeply probe and obtain rich descriptive data about social phenomena through structured interviews, cultural immersion, case studies and observation, for instance.

Strengths and Weaknesses of Quantitative and Qualitative Research

Examples include ethnography, narratives and grounded theory. Qualitative Disadvantages Qualitative studies often take more time to complete due to the pain staking nature of gathering and analyzing field notes, transcribing interviews, identifying themes and studying photographs, for instance.

  • This means that qualitative researchers study things in their natural settings, attempting to make sense of, or interpret, phenomena in terms of the meanings people bring to them;
  • An automated system assigns a numeric value to whatever option a participant chooses, allowing a researcher to quickly gather and analyze large amounts of data;
  • The discovery of grounded theory; strategies for qualitative research;
  • This allows the respondent to talk in some depth, choosing their own words;
  • You may have discovered this by asking an open-ended, qualitative question along these lines:

Studies are not easily replicable or generalizable to the general population. Lacking rigorous scientific controls and numerical data, qualitative findings may be dismissed by some researchers as anecdotal information.

  • Qualitative Disadvantages Qualitative studies often take more time to complete due to the pain staking nature of gathering and analyzing field notes, transcribing interviews, identifying themes and studying photographs, for instance;
  • When setting out to perform user research—whether performing the research yourself or assigning it to an employee or a consultant—it is important to understand the different applications of these two approaches to research.

Mixed Methods A mixed method approach capitalizes on the advantages of the quantitative and qualitative methods while offsetting the drawbacks of each. For instance, a principal interested in building rapport with parents of school children might undertake a mixed method study.

First, the principal would send out a school climate survey to parents asking them to rate their satisfaction with the school and quality of instruction.

Focus groups could then be organized to gather qualitative information from parents to better understand their concerns.