Homeworks academic service


York st john english and creative writing

How can I best prepare for starting my programme?

Introduction to Literary Studies I In this module you will have the chance to build your confidence york st john english and creative writing working with literature at degree level. You will engage with a range of texts written prior to the nineteenth century that includes prose, drama, poetry, speeches, letters and articles. Together, we will start to think about some of the ways that literature and history can be brought together and why the study of English Literature remains a popular and important discipline.

Writing, Research and Literature On this module you will learn the basics of academic writing and research at University level. Drawing upon a range of classic and contemporary short stories and poems as your starting point, you will develop a range of skills such as, using the library catalogue, choosing secondary sources, planning essays, developing arguments, and close reading texts, so that you can write and discuss the works that inspire you with confidence and flair.

This includes an exciting range of texts across different media and forms, from nineteenth century poetry to early cinema and 1930s nonfiction. Who has the power in a literary text? And how do we as readers discern this? We will discuss these issues as they relate to identity politics and the intersections between class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, nation, and age in selected literary works.

  • Cultures of the Now;
  • How have gender debates informed popular culture and critical theory?
  • Coming in the final semester of third year, this module challenges students to draw on all of the skills, theories and approaches they have rehearsed throughout the degree to confront, explore and interrogate the representation of gender roles and sexuality in popular culture;
  • This is the creative and intellectual culmination of your degree, and provides the opportunity to focus on researching and developing a piece of work that particularly excites you;
  • We read texts by writers as diverse as Martha Gellhorn, George Orwell and Kurt Vonnegut and examine the complex relationship between language, experience and memory.

Canonicity This module prepares students to reflect on the study of Literature at Undergraduate level by introducing them to two key, overarching concepts: The module is designed to complement semester 1 modules in which issues of literary value and the canon are raised, albeit in less detail, and to provide a meta-context for students to learn and reflect on why they study what they study at university as well as, more precisely, how canonical assumptions can influence their reading and writing.

Introduction to Creative Writing This module is designed to introduce you to good writing practices and to familiarise you with sharing your work in progress in a workshop environment — which will be a major part of your degree programme. You will be introduced to a variety of strategies and techniques for starting to write. Forms of Narrative Good writers are good readers first and foremost.

This module aims to introduce you to theories, debates, and practices in narrative, in order to enhance your understanding of narrative as it functions within literature and culture generally. There is a choice of creative or critical assessments. Writing to Order This module is intended to introduce you to a range of professional contexts and practices for creative writing.

Previous guest speakers have included successful novelists, poets, scriptwriters and researchers, who have shared their professional experiences with students. The module gives you the opportunity to experiment with a range of written forms, as well as sharing your work in progress and learning more about how professional writers work.

Level 2 At Level 2 you have the chance to follow york st john english and creative writing own writing and research interests, and select the modules that most appeal to you. As a joint honours student, you will take an employability module with either English Literature or Creative Writing. Both of these modules encourage students to consider their professional and transferable skills, and how they might utilise them in the working world, as well as allowing students to undertake work-related projects and have the opportunity to meet professionals from industries including publishing, journalism, and teaching.

This innovative approach to employability has been extremely popular with our students over the past few years. Literary Theory Is it proper to remove literary texts from their historical contexts, or is historical awareness essential to any understanding of the text?

Is it really the case that a text can mean anything to anybody, or are there more objective ways of understanding what texts are and how they work?

What is actually happening when we read literature? This module will engage with the fundamental questions lying behind the discipline of literary studies.

Through a direct discussion of theoretical texts, it will examine concepts such as beauty, culture and language from a range of perspectives. The rationale behind this module is to ask students to think creatively, critically, and innovatively about physical space and literature, and explore the relationship between American socio-economic history, and the development of a specifically American literary tradition. Students on the module will have the opportunity to get involved with the project Terra Two: An Ark for Off-World Survivaland to develop content for the site.

Conflicting Words This module provides an opportunity to read texts produced by and written about major conflicts of the twentieth and early twenty first centuries. We read texts by writers as diverse as Martha Gellhorn, George Orwell and Kurt Vonnegut and examine the complex relationship between language, experience and memory.

What sorts of things can disease suggest in the literary text, and what kinds of associations come with different diseases? Why do some diseases seem to appear in many novels tuberculosis and cancer, for example and why are some less often written about? What kinds of anxieties about society do diseases embody or allow the author to explore?

The module engages with a range of theoretical approaches, from new historicist to feminist and queer readings. From Harlem to Hip-Hop: African American Literature and Culture Obama. Without doubt, the African American experience is a major influence on our contemporary political, cultural, and social landscape.

Creative Writing & English Literature

Starting with the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and 1930s and continuing through to the present day, we will discuss key African American novels, plays, and poems alongside music including jazz, soul, blues, and hip-hopfilm, art, and political writings in order to better understand the ways that black writers respond to and shape American culture and history.

Civil War to Civil Society: How did writers explain seismic changes to a growing readership? What new kinds of literature emerged to make sense of events and what kind of community was created through reading? In addition to examining specific examples of film adaptation, students can choose to experiment creatively on a project of their own.

Literature at Work This module will enable English Literature students to engage in discussions about a range of career trajectories relevant to their degree on both a practical and ideological level.

Team work and project management are integral features, with students working in groups to develop, plan, and execute a project or alternatively, to engage in work-place learning through an external placement. Guest speakers will introduce a variety of graduate career pathways, potentially including publishing, research, teaching, marketing, and journalism.

Writing Fiction An opportunity to read and produce a range of fictional forms, from flash-fictions to novellas, short stories to novels. You will develop an understanding of characterisation; voice; plotting; narration; dialogue and point of view. Creative Non-Fiction You will have the opportunity to explore examples of non-fiction such as journalism, creative non-fiction, fictocriticism, manifestos, political tracts, graffiti, non-fiction graphic novels, blogs, online journals, live-tweeting and new media, travel writing, documentary and life writing.

By viewing, reading and watching a range of non-fictional texts, you will develop your own original non-fictional texts. Writing Poetry From the sonnet to the prose poem, learn about the formal qualities of poetry, how to produce dazzling imagery and perfect rhythm; manipulate voice and pace.

You will study a range of contemporary poets, supplemented by visits and readings from some of them. You will produce your york st john english and creative writing portfolio of pieces by the end of the course.

Scriptwriting This module addresses the essential elements of scriptwriting — writing convincing dialogue, creating interesting characters, and constructing coherent stories — within a creative and supportive atmosphere. You will develop your expressive and technical skills in writing scripts for one or more of the following disciplines: Publishing, Production and Performance The aim of this work-related module is to develop your understanding of the relationship between creative writing practices and employability in the creative industries.

Level 3 In your final year you will be ready to take on a bigger role in the management of your learning. You might find yourself leading a class discussion, or doing a non-assessed presentation in a seminar. You will write a dissertation an extended project that runs for the whole academic year on the subject of your choice, and with the support of an academic supervisor. In many ways, this is in the intellectual culmination of your degree, as you become an independent researcher and are required to manage your own academic project.

Many of our students note that this is one of the most enjoyable sections york st john english and creative writing their degree, as they are specialising in a literary topic that they are passionate about, and are putting into practice the skills they have accrued during their time at York St John University. English Literature Dissertation In your final year, you will be ready to take on a bigger role in the management of your learning.

Students write a dissertation an extended project that runs for the whole academic year on the subject of their choice, and with the support of an academic supervisor. In many ways, this is in the intellectual culmination of the degree, as students become independent researchers and are required to manage their own academic project. Many of our students note that this is one of the most enjoyable sections of their degree, as they are specialising in a literary topic that they are passionate about, and are putting into practice the skills they have accrued during their time at York St John.

Creative Writing Dissertation In your final year, you have the opportunity to devise your own original creative writing project. This is the creative and intellectual culmination of your degree, and provides the opportunity to focus on researching and developing a piece of work that particularly excites you.

Many students find this to be one of the most rewarding experiences of their degree. The Experimental Century By the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the religious, philosophical and cultural assumptions of the Western hemisphere had been smashed into pieces.

This module will introduce students to these restless modernists, and explore the consequences of their work in twentieth century culture. Along the way it will examine how the Civil Rights Movement, feminism, and queer subcultures turned experimental aesthetics to new, politically radical ends.

Davison, 2009 mode of writing. We will be reading poetry and prose, drama and non-fiction throughout the module, as well as considering other media art, film, sound and critical theories of the Gothic. The Making of Modern Drama This module examines aspects of theatrical experimentation over the last century, and its impact on the contemporary stage. In addition to comparing the aims and achievements of different theatrical movements, students may undertake a creative project e.

Special Topics in English Literature I and II This module allows final year students to be involved with current staff research projects. Outside the Canon This module will examine a selection of texts from twentieth century American literature and relate the works to their cultural, social and political backgrounds. The module will focus on texts that demonstrate formal innovation and experimentation, and will reflect the plurality of twentieth century American experience.

  • The rationale behind this module is to ask students to think creatively, critically, and innovatively about physical space and literature, and explore the relationship between American socio-economic history, and the development of a specifically American literary tradition;
  • The module gives you the opportunity to experiment with a range of written forms, as well as sharing your work in progress and learning more about how professional writers work;
  • There will be a host of additional events and projects that you can get involved in each year to supplement your learning;
  • Students write a dissertation an extended project that runs for the whole academic year on the subject of their choice, and with the support of an academic supervisor.

The aim is to introduce students to a range of writing from and about the Caribbean which reveal the longstanding global dimensions of this writing and the ways in which this is currently being marked and remembered. The close connections between Britain and the Caribbean will be a particular focus, both in a historical and contemporary context. Cultures of the Now: Contemporary Writing This module encourages students to consolidate their understanding of the history of literature by examining a range of texts from a variety of locations — Europe and the USA, but also Africa and the Asian subcontinent — in order to get a grip on the strange paradoxes of our own global moment.

Is the world a fragmented assortment of local traditions, or a conformist monoculture? What do those in one part of the world owe to those living in another? Gender and Sexualities When it comes to issues of gender and sexuality, what is natural and what is cultural? How have gender debates informed popular culture and critical theory? How are different genders and sexualities presented in film and literature? And how do different cultural groups use popular culture and literature to reinforce, challenge, transgress or disrupt traditional york st john english and creative writing expectations?

Coming in the final semester of third year, this module challenges students to draw on all of the skills, theories and approaches they have rehearsed throughout the degree to confront, explore and interrogate the representation of gender roles and sexuality in popular culture. Theory and Practice This module provides the opportunity to learn from some of the most innovative approaches to creative writing.

You will develop an understanding of the emergence of genres such as crime, horror, dystopia, noir, and romance, as well as the emergence of new genres and contemporary sub-genres. Creative Research in Practice This module brings together the skills developed throughout you Creative Writing degree, giving you the opportunity to devise new creative projects that are underpinned by research.

The module simulates the conditions of professional project development and encourages autonomy, project management and decision making, to help prepare you for a writing life beyond your degree. Programme specification Further information on this course is available in the programme specification.

Please note that the programme specification relates to course content that is currently being studied by students at the University. For new programmes, the programme specification will be made available online prior to the start of the course. Disability Advice York St John University works hard to create an inclusive environment for all our students.