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A discussion on the challenges and hardships of our generation

New Challenges and Changes Facing Millennial Generation Parents By Shaindy Urman About a month ago, I sat in a tall, straight-back chair at a long, regal dining room table, surrounded by my family and piles of flattened, round, unleavened bread, singing songs, drinking wine, and celebrating freedom. Candles were lit, the table was set, and we all reflected upon our history as a nation — from generation to generation. But this year, the first night of Pesach was also meaningful for me on another level: Clearly a very big deal.

Who We Are I, along with my generation, am a millennial. Although the precise years have not exactly been determined, millennials are considered to be Generation Y, individuals who were born roughly between 1980 and Y2K, the very last generation of the 20th century.

  1. When I asked what your biggest challenges were a lot of you spilled it all and talked to me about depression, debt, failures in your relationships, winning the approval of your parents, increasing your mental, physical, and spiritual health, work-life balance, and how to make friends who will support you. Census Bureau reports that millennials in America now number 75.
  2. Whereas generations ago, children traditionally lived with a mother, a father, and several siblings, today we have families of various compositions.
  3. A New Kind of Parenting In years past, the manner of disciplining children at home and in school was completely up to the parents and educators, regardless of how this impacted the children.
  4. Of that percentage, a significant amount includes parents, who find themselves moving back home with their parents along with their spouse and children. Millennials are lazy, entitled narcissists who still live with their parents.
  5. The Challenges Facing Our Generation.

The word millennial gets thrown around a lot these days: Millennials, it seems, tend to get a bad rep. Millennials are lazy, entitled narcissists who still live with their parents.

We are the topics of headlines and studies, the subjects of speeches and marketing schemes. Yes, we millennials are many things. We are tolerant and we are optimistic. We care about the world and the people around us, and we strive to make our Earth a better place. The New Family Unit Though millennials are traditionally viewed as young and free and spoken about as if they are children, millennials are now having children of their own.

Census Bureau reports that millennials in America now number 75. Parenting today is not what it used to be in generations past; some say that millennial parents are too forgiving, too validating, and too friendly towards their children.

Certainly, millennials do things very differently than our grandparents did.

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But even before all that, we need to recognize that millennials are different, and families, too, are different today in their very composition. Whereas generations ago, children traditionally lived with a mother, a father, and several siblings, today we have families of various compositions. Take, for example, single-parent households. Single parents today — whether by choice or by circumstance — are empowered, independent, and have overcome tremendous hardships.

It is a sign of strength, not shame, to leave a destructive marriage or to successfully raise children alone when there is no spouse to raise them with, and society is slowly learning to see that. The never-ending cycle of: Somehow, there never seems to be enough hours in the day to accomplish it all.

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In some cases, parents are still attending or have gone back to college, even with young children at home, which creates its own unique set of challenges in terms of time management, financial stress, distribution of household responsibilities, and childcare arrangements. Once completing additional schooling and drowning in student debt, many graduates encounter the extreme difficulty of finding employment in their respective field.

In addition to job insecurity and the high cost of living in general, housing, in particular, has become impossibly costly. According to a U.

Renting costs, as well, have increased significantly, and many households today consist of two working parents who put in long hours, yet still struggle to keep up with the bills. Many a millennial parent is forced to get creative and figure out ways to cut costs, and one surprising way millennials are saving money is by moving back in with their parents. Of that percentage, a significant amount includes parents, who find themselves moving back home with their parents along with their spouse and children.

A Socially Networked Generation One of the biggest changes this generation has faced is the reliance on and rampant use of technology.

  • Truly anything is possible;
  • We need to know what you are struggling with and we are looking for ideas to write about;
  • The never-ending cycle of;
  • Let other people know what you are struggling with, or what your friends or colleagues are struggling with;
  • Take, for example, single-parent households;
  • Certainly, millennials do things very differently than our grandparents did.

In fact, millennial parents are using technology to improve their parenting by researching and asking questions, getting things done quickly, and using the power of social media to interact and bond with other parents in a way that has never existed before. As with all modern inventions, our phones can be used to help or to harm, but the benefits of having the world so readily accessible at our fingertips can be tremendously helpful when we are already juggling so much.

A New Kind of Parenting In years past, the manner of disciplining children at home and in school was completely up to the parents and educators, regardless of how this impacted the children. Somehow, it was fully acceptable for an adult to use physical and harmful means to discipline a child, as long as the adult believed it was the right thing to do. Some still believe that this form of discipline benefits the child, despite studies that show the long-term psychological and emotional harm this type of behavior can cause.

Many, however, understand that there are other ways to discipline children, none of which involve excessive corporal punishment. Millennial parents are more psychologically aware than ever before, and it is not uncommon for parents to attend lectures, parenting classes, family therapy, or individual therapy, to learn parenting skills and how to better cope with everyday stresses.

As in every generation, some millennial parents want to parent their children exactly as their parents did, while others intend on doing the exact opposite. Either way, there is a new awareness and understanding of the fragility of a child and his needs for validation, understanding, and having his basic needs met. We care about what we eat and the air that we breathe, and we try to be good and help others around us.

We also worry about our children — a lot, and we do everything in our power to ensure that they do well. In a world that is constantly changing and rapidly evolving, we are doing our best to raise our children and help them to be confident, healthy, successful individuals.

Shaindy Urman is a millennial parent and freelance writer who has contributed to parenting websites Kveller and Romper, and whose work has appeared in Tablet and The Forward.