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Advice to youth by mark twain syntax

They said it should be something suitable to youth-something didactic, instructive, or something in the nature of good advice.

  1. I will say to you my young friends -- and I say it beseechingly, urgently -- Always obey your parents, when they are present.
  2. A feeble, stupid, preposterous lie will not live two years -- except it be a slander upon somebody. I will say to you my young friends -- and I say it beseechingly, urgently -- Always obey your parents, when they are present.
  3. Never handle firearms carelessly.
  4. You want to be very careful about lying; otherwise you are nearly sure to get caught. But I have said enough.
  5. Students are asked to imitate the essay in an effort to discover the inner workings of satiric technique. Mark Twain was widely popular at the time of the talk; his essays and travelogues had already made him an iconic humorist.

I will say to you my young friends -- and I say it beseechingly, urgently -- Always obey your parents, when they are present. Most parents think they know better than you do, and you can generally make more by humoring that superstition than you can by acting on your own better judgment.

Be respectful to your superiors, if you have any, also to strangers, and sometimes to others.

  • I hope you will treasure up the instructions which I have given you, and make them a guide to your feet and a light to your understanding;
  • Clemens had an uncanny ability to capture the truth of his own life and 19th century America.

If a person offend you, and you are in doubt as to whether it was intentional or not, do not resort to extreme measures; simply watch your chance and hit him with a brick. That will be sufficient. Yes, always avoid violence; in this age of charity and kindliness, the time has gone by for such things. Leave dynamite to the low and unrefined. Go to bed early, get up early -- this is wise.

Advice to Youth - A Satire by Mark Twain

Some authorities say get up with the sun; some say get up with one thing, others with another. But a lark is really the best thing to get up with. Now as to the matter of lying.

  1. Ether Monument, Public Garden, The.
  2. You want to be very careful about lying; otherwise you are nearly sure to get caught. Today, the essay manages to remain active in modern culture.
  3. Only four days ago, right in the next farm house to the one where I am spending the summer, a grandmother, old and gray and sweet, one of the loveliest spirits in the land, was sitting at her work, when her young grandson crept in and got down an old, battered, rusty gun which had not been touched for many years and was supposed not to be loaded, and pointed it at her, laughing and threatening to shoot.
  4. Once caught, you can never again be in the eyes to the good and the pure, what you were before. This novel, narrated by a young boy, provides further social critique.
  5. But I have said enough. Now as to the matter of lying.

You want to be very careful about lying; otherwise you are nearly sure to get caught. Once caught, you can never again be in the eyes to the good and the pure, what you were before.

WHAT IS THE ISSUE MARK TWAIN IS SATIRIZING ON "ADVICE TO YOUTH"?

Many a young person has injured himself permanently through a single clumsy and ill finished lie, the result of carelessness born of incomplete training. Some authorities hold that the young out not to lie at all. That of course, is putting it rather stronger than necessary; still while I cannot go quite so far as that, I do maintainand I believe I am right, that the young ought to be temperate in the use of this great art until practice and experience shall give them that confidence, elegance, and precision which alone can make the accomplishment graceful and profitable.

Patience, diligence, painstaking attention to detail -- these are requirements; these in time, will make the student perfect; upon these only, may he rely as the sure foundation for future eminence. Is this truth mighty, and will it prevail?

Expert Answers

Ah no, my hearers, the monument is made of hardy material, but the lie it tells will outlast it a million years. An awkward, feeble, leaky lie is a thing which you ought to make it your unceasing study to avoid; such a lie as that has no more real permanence than an average truth.

  • Specific examples of this can be seen in his choice of language, saying that children obey parents because "[parents] think they know better than you;
  • Known to Everyone—Liked by All;
  • In the same year, Twain began his own publishing house, Charles L;
  • Known to Everyone—Liked by All;
  • Is this truth mighty, and will it prevail?
  • But I have said enough.

Why, you might as well tell the truth at once and be done with it. A feeble, stupid, preposterous lie will not live two years -- except it be a slander upon somebody. It is indestructible, then of course, but that is no merit of yours. If I had begun earlier, I could have learned how.

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Never handle firearms carelessly. The sorrow and suffering that have been caused through the innocent but heedless handling of firearms by the young! Only four days ago, right in the next farm house to the one where I am spending the summer, a grandmother, old and gray and sweet, one of the loveliest spirits in the land, was sitting at her work, when her young grandson crept in and got down an old, battered, rusty gun which had not been touched for many years and was supposed not to be loaded, and pointed it at her, laughing and threatening to shoot.

In her fright she ran screaming and pleading toward the door on the other side of the room; but as she passed him he placed the gun almost against her very breast and pulled the trigger!

He had supposed it was not loaded. It is the only case of that kind I ever heard of. No, you just pick out a relative and bang away, and you are sure to get him.

Think what Waterloo would have been if one of the armies had been boys armed with old muskets supposed not to be loaded, and the other army had been composed of their female relations. The very thought of it make one shudder.

What is the goal of Mark Twain

There are many sorts of books; but good ones are the sort for the young to read. They are a great, an inestimable, and unspeakable means of improvement. But I have said enough. I hope you will treasure up the instructions which I have given you, and make them a guide to your feet and a light to your understanding.