Homeworks academic service


Case life in the fast lane fast food chains race to be number one

Share this article Share When it comes to why people decide to eat at fast food restaurants, Wansink refers to a study that found, 'aside from hunger, participants claimed they started eating because of the salience of food "I saw the food"the social aspects of eating "I wanted to be with other people"or simply because eating provided them with something to do. Fast food chains all play on these desires in the way they are positioned and marketed.

  • Still other prospective operators answered Kroc's newspaper ads;
  • Over the course of the decade, the thousand stores that the company opened overseas fueled its 27 percent annual growth rate;
  • It's wrapped in paper or a box that's easy to open and you don't need to worry about a knife and fork or cutting up the food first - as you can eat the burgers, chips and nuggets with your fingers;
  • He thought McDonald's could make money by leasing or buying potential store sites and then subleasing them to franchisees initially at a 20 percent markup, and then at a 40 percent markup;
  • They had also devised the rudiments of a hamburger assembly line so they could deliver orders in less than sixty seconds.

By having restaurants in High Streets, shopping centres and motorway service stations, they can tempt people in to eat when they're shopping or driving somewhere - even when they're not hungry.

They entice people by showing pictures of the food on offer in window display posters and on large, bright boards above the tills.

  • Those buying large sizes are more likely to consume the whole thing, as explained above, but are also not always likely to be alarmed by the amount they have consumed;
  • Consequently Kroc took great pains to differentiate McDonald's from these players -- for competitive and intellectual reasons;
  • But I couldn't do that and, at the same time, treat him as a customer," he said.

They play on the 'wanting to be with out people' aspect by providing a space for people to sit down around a table and eat together, rather than having long benches of seats where people can't interact with one another or having no seating area at all. Providing a space for people to sit and eat also means they are more likely to stay longer and eat more courses - returning for dessert or another fizzy drink.

They can also do this by making people queue and order at the counter, rather than offering table service.

Sample Material

This means the customer has to wait to see the person in front of them being served their food at the counter on a tray. The first customer will then walk back past the waiting customers who will see and smell the food on their tray - again enticing the waiting customer to order more when it's their turn.

The music fast food restaurants play can also effect how much we eat. Hearing soft music that's not too up-tempo has been proven to encourage diners to stay at a restaurant longer and eat more.

Hence, slow songs and easy going pop music is played in fast food restaurants - not drum and bass or techno dance tracks.

REVEALED: The tricks fast food restaurants use to get you to eat more

Do you want fries with that? This isn't to make life easier for the time-strapped customer but again to make them consume more. Studies have found that one of the strongest influences on consumption is ease of access.

  1. Sure, there was one store for every 90,000 citizens of the United States in 1972. And to their great chagrin, Kroc took to offering unsolicited advice on how they could improve their businesses.
  2. This insured that operators unwillingly to play by his rules could open no more than one outlet.
  3. By 1960, there were more than 200 McDonald's outlets across the country, a rapid expansion fueled by low franchising fees. Kroc instantly knew he had seen the future.
  4. This insured that operators unwillingly to play by his rules could open no more than one outlet. Unable to strike it big in Tinseltown, the brothers wound up as proprietors of a drive-in restaurant in San Bernardino, a dusty outpost fifty-five miles east of Los Angeles.

This refers to the effort it takes to obtain the food and the ease required to eat it. Fast food restaurants solve this by serving food quickly and in a way that's easy to eat. It's wrapped in paper or a box that's easy to open and you don't need to worry about a knife and fork or cutting up the food first - as you can eat the burgers, chips and nuggets with your fingers. They encourage people to think they are saving money when they could actually be buying more food than they need.

Studies have shown that by offering people variety they are more likely to overindulge.

Ray Kroc, McDonald's, And The Fast-Food Industry

So a meal deal where a person gets chips with their burger means they'll eat both - even if they were only actually hungry enough to eat one or the other. When presented with this one, large bucket of chicken, many people would eat the lot.

  1. But he was barely turning a profit. Embracing Sonneborn's idea, in 1956 Kroc set up a subsidiary, the Franchise Realty Corporation, to execute the new strategy.
  2. But Kroc believed the company needed to continue to expand in order to survive.
  3. Kroc's sales experience taught him that business was a Darwinian proposition, in which those least fit and adaptable would go the way of the dinosaur. And he couldn't afford to tread water.
  4. Expanding the Ronald McDonald campaign created by the Washington franchises, the company outfitted the clown with a gaggle of kid-friendly characters such as Hamburglar, Mayor McCheese, and Grimace, a large purple creature who craved shakes and french fries.

But if the same amount of chicken was given to them in three smaller boxes, they wouldn't eat it all The way the portions are served also encourages over-eating. Having one bucket of chicken means people are more likely to eat all the chicken in the bucket as it's perceived as one portion.

But if the same number of pieces of chicken were divided into three boxes, people are less likely to eat the contents of all three. Wansink points out that 'although the physical effort to open the small component packages is minimal, a psychological barrier may prevent individuals from opening another item if they have already opened and eaten several of them.

Part of the reason is that the smaller packages provide discrete stopping points for a person to reconsider whether he or she wants to continue eating. Those buying large sizes are more likely to consume the whole thing, as explained above, but are also not always likely to be alarmed by the amount they have consumed. This is another crafty trick of the fast food industry - they have made consuming large portions seem to be 'the norm'.

They implicitly suggest what might be construed as a 'normal' or 'appropriate' amount to consume. Even if individuals do not clean their plates or finish the package, the larger size gives them liberty to consume beyond the point where they might have stopped with a smaller, but still unconstrained, supply. There is a flexible range as to how much food an individual can eat and one can often "make room for more". Many seemingly isolated influences of consumption - such as package size, variety, plate size, or the presence of others - may involve or suggest a consumption norm that influences how much individuals will eat or drink.