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Compare and contrast italian and northern renaissance

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Early Netherlandish paintingDutch and Flemish Renaissance paintingand Northern Mannerism The detailed realism of Early Netherlandish paintingled by Robert Campin and Jan van Eyck in the 1420s and 1430s, is today generally considered to be the beginning of the early Northern Renaissance in painting. This detailed realism was greatly respected in Italy, but there was little reciprocal influence on the North until nearly the end of the 15th century.

  1. More Bibles could spread and people could read the Bible for the first time. Some social historians reject the concept of the Renaissance altogether.
  2. The Italians made sure their paintings were symmetrical, balanced, proportional, had depth, and were idealistic.
  3. For the first time, people wanted portraits-showing the value individualism.
  4. Classic Architecture Italian Renaissance architects were surrounded by Classical architecture ruins.
  5. The rich in Italy did not want paintings of peasants. History of Art 5th, rev.

Other notable northern painters, such as Hans Holbein the Elder and Jean Fouquetretained a Gothic influence that was still popular in the north, while highly individualistic artists such as Hieronymus Bosch and Pieter Bruegel the Elder developed styles that were imitated by many subsequent generations. Later in the 16th century Northern painters increasingly looked and travelled to Rome, becoming known as the Romanists.

The High Renaissance art of Michelangelo and Raphael and the late Renaissance stylistic tendencies of Mannerism that were in vogue had a great impact on their work. Renaissance humanism and the large number of surviving classical artworks and monuments encouraged many Italian painters to explore Greco-Roman themes more prominently than northern artists, and likewise the famous 15th-century German and Dutch paintings tend to be religious.

In the 16th century, mythological and other themes from history became more uniform amongst northern and Italian artists.

Northern Renaissance

Northern Renaissance painters, however, had new subject matter, such as landscape and genre painting. As Renaissance art styles moved through northern Europe, they changed and were adapted to local customs.

In England and the northern Netherlands the Reformation brought religious painting almost completely to an end. Despite several very talented Artists of the Tudor Court in England, portrait painting was slow to spread from the elite.

Compare and contrast the northern with the Italian renaissance.

In France the School of Fontainebleau was begun by Italians such as Rosso Fiorentino in the latest Mannerist style, but succeeded in establishing a durable national style. By the end of the 16th century, artists such as Karel van Mander and Hendrik Goltzius collected in Haarlem in a brief but intense phase of Northern Mannerism that also spread to Flanders.

  1. The rich in Italy did not want paintings of peasants.
  2. Once your masterpiece in the Renaissance style is created, write a letter to seek a Patron.
  3. They more detail they put in a painting, the better.

The Renaissance[ edit ] The Renaissance is one of the most interesting and disputed periods of European history. Many scholars see it as a unique time with characteristics all its own.

A second group views the Renaissance as the first two to three centuries of a larger era in European history usually called early modern Europe, which began in the late fifteenth century and ended on the eve of the French Revolution 1789 or with the close of the Napoleonic era 1815.

Some social historians reject the concept of the Renaissance altogether. Historians also argue over how much the Renaissance differed from the Middle Ages and whether it was the beginning of the modern world, however defined. It is also said that group views the Renaissance as the first two to three centuries of a larger era in European history usually called early modern Europe.

History of Art 5th, rev. Lisa Deam, "Flemish versus Netherlandish: A Discourse of Nationalism," in Renaissance Quarterly, vol.

Northern Renaissance vs. Italian Renaissance Art

Chipps Smith, Jeffrey 2004. The Renaissance in the North. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.