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Compare and contrast the american french and latin american revolution

  • The leadership in both countries at the time of their revolutions was certainly repressive, especially in terms of taxation;
  • While many of the former viceroyalties in South America united as nation-states, like Argentina, Chile, Venezuela, and others, and attempts like Gran Colombia were made by Simon Bolivar and his followers to foster Latin American unity, several nation-states emerged from the wars of independence;
  • It way was blocked and recognition of its worth was denied by a decaying class of parasitic, hereditary privileged, noble landowners;
  • At the same time the usa's revolution was very violent, i do not suppose it used to be as much because the French Revolution;
  • And the united states used to be a extra devout situation, many came to america for religious freedom, although now not all had been devout.

Also, the Enlightenment writings of Locke, Voltaire, Montesquieu, and other philosophers nurtured the colonists' desire for independence and self-rule. Hence, in the late 18th and early 19th century, struggles for independence raged through the Continental America. The American revolution and Latin American wars of independence were different in strategies and social structures but similar in term of cause-and-effect.

For example, it was much easier for the Americans to gain independence than the Latin Americans because of the former's unity in contrast to the latter's disunity. The former could advance in the colonial society whilst the latter, especially the Creoles, could not because of their social structures.

  1. Revolutionary leaders in both regions were in part motivated by ideals of self-government that can be traced to the Enlightenment.
  2. Just as in America, it was the middle and lower classes involved in the revolution and although the loyalists in America had a sound following, the demographics of the revolution were essentially the same.
  3. In term of cause-and-effect, both the Americans and Creoles could not stand the mother countries' systems of mercantilism because they were hindering the growing economy.
  4. The colonial society was almost fixed with the Penisulares at the very top, then Creoles, Mestizos, native Americans, and at the very bottom there were Mulattos, Zambos, free blacks and slaves.
  5. Indeed, the revolutions in Latin America proceeded as a series of events rather than as a relatively unified uprising in a short space of time as in North America.

In term of cause-and-effect, both of them were fighting for independence from the Old World because they could not stand the strict mercantilist systems, applied on them by their mother countries, that were hindering the development of the rapidly growing colonial economy.

The Americans could quickly gained their independence because they were unified.

Compare and contrast the North American and Latin American revolutions.

For instance, when the British empire posed the Stamp Act on the colonists, they stood up and unified the thirteen colonies; in 1765, they called for the Stamp Act Congress in order to move towards intercolonial unity. Furthermore, they even founded a secret society called "Sons of Liberty" to stop the enforcement of the Stamp Act laws by any means, including violence. Above all, it was the Continental Congress that would be running the revolution, showing the holistic strength of the American union.

The Creoles, on the contrary, lacked a unfied strategy, or rather direcction, in which to follow.

For example, there were many juntas that were fighting against Spain across the continental South America without one single leader and a single force not until San Martin resgined and let Simon Bolivar take the lead in the struggle for independence. Furthermore, the Creoles' failure to quickly achieve independence was due to vast distances and geographical obstacles between regions and cultural isolation of the Latin American provinces.

Social structure was one of the factors that caused dissatisfaction amongst the Creoles. The arrival of more European-born Spaniards meant that the animosity between the Peninsulares and Creoles was worsened; the Creoles were unhappy with the discrimination they had to endure even though the law stated that both of them were equally privileged. The colonial society was almost fixed with the Penisulares at the very top, then Creoles, Mestizos, native Americans, and at the very bottom there were Mulattos, Zambos, free blacks and slaves.

  • The inability to advance in Latin American colonial society caused discontent amongst the Creoles but on the contrary the American meritocratic colonists could work hard to gain wealth and power;
  • Of direction, our revolution encouraged the notion of the French Revolution, the French, most above all, Lafayette, a nobleman led troops in the battles in opposition to the British;
  • Revolutionary leaders in both regions were in part motivated by ideals of self-government that can be traced to the Enlightenment;
  • The acts dictated that all goods must be carried on English vessels, all ships from American must stop at English ports first, certain goods must be sent from England to the America for sales and consumption, and certain other goods, such as woolen cloth, were forbidden from manufacture;
  • In term of cause-and-effect, both the Americans and Creoles could not stand the mother countries' systems of mercantilism because they were hindering the growing economy;
  • Indeed, the revolutions in Latin America proceeded as a series of events rather than as a relatively unified uprising in a short space of time as in North America.

Even though the Creoles could become richer than the peninsulares, they would never be able to climb up the social ladder because of this fixed structure. On the other hand, the American colonial society was in nature meritocratic; the colonists, if they worked hard enough, could become wealthy and powerful. A good example to illustrate this meritocracy is the indentured servants; although they started as servants, after a long while they could become land owners.

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Hard work was the most important requirement for wealth and social prestige in this meritocratic colonial society.

In term of cause-and-effect, both the Americans and Creoles could not stand the mother countries' systems of mercantilism because they were hindering the growing economy.

  1. Also, the Enlightenment writings of Locke, Voltaire, Montesquieu, and other philosophers nurtured the colonists' desire for independence and self-rule. Even though they were powerful in both France and America at the start of each revolution, their strangleholds on both the people and economies of each nation were weakening.
  2. Just as in America, it was the middle and lower classes involved in the revolution and although the loyalists in America had a sound following, the demographics of the revolution were essentially the same. Revolutionary leaders in both regions were in part motivated by ideals of self-government that can be traced to the Enlightenment.
  3. In conclusion, the American revolution and Spanish wars of independence were strategically and socially different but similar in term of cause-and-effect. For example, it was much easier for the Americans to gain independence than the Latin Americans because of the former's unity in contrast to the latter's disunity.
  4. As for differences, one major point of departure was the fact that Latin American colonies, unlike those in North America, did not join together as a unified nation-state in the aftermath of their revolutions. For instance, in the mid-eighteenth century the British Empire posed on her colonists the Navigation Acts which strictly regulated trade.
  5. Its vitality was further jeopardized by a monarchy not only committed to antiquated aristocratic values, but also incapable of giving the country that firm yet benignly restrained direction under which the initiative of men of business might flourish" Lucas 84. In term of cause-and-effect, both of them were fighting for independence from the Old World because they could not stand the strict mercantilist systems, applied on them by their mother countries, that were hindering the development of the rapidly growing colonial economy.

For instance, in the mid-eighteenth century the British Empire posed on her colonists the Navigation Acts which strictly regulated trade. The acts dictated that all goods must be carried on English vessels, all ships from American must stop at English ports first, certain goods must be sent from England to the America for sales and consumption, and certain other goods, such as woolen cloth, were forbidden from manufacture.

Similarly, in Latin America, trades were dominated by the peninsulares because of the discrimination discussed earlier.

Compare and Contrast the French Revolution and Latin American Independence Movements?

Furthermore, the Bourbon reform policies failed to provide Latin Americans, especially the Creoles and Mestizos, any adequate protection against crippling European competition from England, France, Netherlands, etc. In conclusion, the American revolution and Spanish wars of independence were strategically and socially different but similar in term of cause-and-effect. The Americans quickly achieved independence from mother England whilst the Creoles had to spend a longer time to get rid of Spain's rule because their different strategic directions.

A Comparison of the French Revolution and American Revolution

The inability to advance in Latin American colonial society caused discontent amongst the Creoles but on the contrary the American meritocratic colonists could work hard to gain wealth and power.

Last edited by Philosophy; 10-02-2005 at 06: