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Different annotations on a students life and college culture

Printable Version Astin, A. Effects of College on Beliefs, Attitudes, and Knowledge. In his first book and major study of college students, Astin looks at changes in attitudes, beliefs, self-concept, behavior, academic achievement, the career path, and college satisfaction.

  • This table characterizes three domains of intercultural maturity i;
  • Korean American Evangelicals on Campus;
  • In digital space these annotations can become a transformative public act as the text being annotated takes a backseat to the collective backchannel;
  • Much research in the last two decades has demonstrated that human responses deviate from the performance deemed normative according to various models of decision making and rational judgment e;
  • To Improve the Academy, 15, 3-15.

Questions explored about religion include how religious affiliation changes or is weakened during college, how religious attendance is impacted, what aspects of the college experience contribute to these changes, and how student experiences and changes are different at secular, Catholic, and Protestant institutions.

Astin notes differences by gender, race, and academic ability. What Matters different annotations on a students life and college culture College?: Four Critical Years Revisited. The effects of the religious composition of the student body an environmental characteristic and the religious attendance of students an involvement variable on many of the above variables are measured and reported. Can college students be categorized and their college experiences predicted?

Of course, few students will fit perfectly into these categories, but many are likely to resemble one type more than the others. Other types Astin mentions include scholars, activists, and artists.

This article may be especially useful to university administrators. Results of a U. The importance of religion to a student is tested, as well as college size, college culture, the importance of community service, engaging in other risky behaviors, and time spent studying, with friends, and partying.

Although the impact of religion is weaker than the other activities, its importance to student drug use is still considered. A Review of the Literature from 1970 to 1986. The authors divide the literature into four sections: Despite the breadth of areas covered in the existing research, the authors cite a number of methodological problems: The authors survey 144 college students to learn more about the relationship between religiosity and psychological wellbeing and the degree to which racial and religious variables matter.

Findings suggest that despite similarity of religious belief, the relationship of personal religion to psychological health is stronger among African American students. The IVCF has a membership of more than two hundred students on a campus of fourteen thousand. One strategy is a form of resistance. Here, evangelicals might articulate their evangelical convictions and beliefs in a classroom discussion, though they often do so in a cautious manner.

Religion and Higher Education, edited by D. This chapter provides a useful overview of research on college student spirituality. He surveys prior research about the religious and spiritual journey of college students through the university, year by year, and then identifies four important factors that impact these journeys: How to Develop Students Purposefully. This book addresses three ways that ten faith-based colleges and universities profess to effectively cultivate the holistic development of their students.

The first is the intentionality of colleges: The third is the role that faculty and other adults on campus play in the holistic development of students. The authors provide recommendations for other colleges wishing to improve holistic student development on their campuses, including: Participation in religious communities is central to the lives of many college students across the United States.

Few studies, however, provide detailed information about the content of student beliefs, or on the impacts—academic, personal, and religious—of these groups on their members over time. The author complements her quantitative findings with an in-depth case study of an evangelical student group on the campus of a large university. Bryant observed and interviewed members of Sharing the Faith Fellowship a pseudonyma conservative evangelical group on the campus of a large university.

Many of the students she interviewed, for example, possessed different annotations on a students life and college culture liberal and conservative views simultaneously. While she found consensus among student views on moral conduct particularly in the areas of drinking, sex, abortion that was consistent with traditional evangelicalism, some respondents had non-traditional feelings toward the gay and lesbian community.

Bryant explores the gendered experiences of student members of a college evangelical community. Her study builds on her dissertation findings see Bryant 2004 that college evangelicals possess conservative beliefs in gender roles, and that evangelical communities are defined by masculine norms. Bryant concludes with a discussion of the potential negative consequences of beliefs in traditional gender roles.

Science of Learning Colloquium Topics and Annotated Bibliography

What do these students—Hindus, Muslims, Buddhists, Jews, Unitarian Universalists, and the nonreligious—believe about life, the sacred, and other big questions, and how do they practice their faith?

Using data from a Higher Education Research Institute study, Bryant explores the great diversity in spiritual beliefs among these students. How are students changed, religiously and spiritually, by their freshman year of college?

The authors look to a study that asks students a variety of questions about their religious lives at the beginning of the first college year and again at the end. The authors also note differences that result from how students spend their free time during the year and what type of college—secular or faith-based—they attend.

Colloquim Topics

His article provides an introduction to campus ministries. Cawthon and Jones argue that the two types of ministries differ in the types of religious experiences they provide to students. Traditional ministries provide denominationally specific theological doctrine; multi-generational worship communities; smaller settings; and ordained leadership. Contemporary ministries, by contrast, provide eclectic and nondenominational worship styles; worship with members of their peer group; high-energy, large-group settings; and lay leadership.

University of North Carolina Press.

  1. Researchers at the Higher Education Research Institute address this question and others in a comprehensive, multi-year study of Spirituality in Higher Education.
  2. Positive as well as negative moods and emotions can facilitate as well as inhibit problem solving, depending on the nature of the task.
  3. He surveys prior research about the religious and spiritual journey of college students through the university, year by year, and then identifies four important factors that impact these journeys. What do college instructors believe and how do those beliefs impact their teaching?
  4. In this working paper, Ecklund and Scheitle present preliminary findings from their survey of science faculty attitudes toward religion.

In this book, the authors make extended visits to four very different college campuses to learn more about religious beliefs and practices on campus.

The authors find many similarities in religious expression as well as some unique characteristics at each institution. Encouraging Authenticity and Spirituality in Higher Education. This book is a resource for students, faculty, and administrators looking for strategies to integrate spirituality into college life. Part II focuses on effective policies for integrating spirituality into the college curriculum, student affairs, and community partnerships.

Part III features essays that offer recommendations for campus leaders and professional development. Throughout the authors provide real-life examples of successful practices and programs on campuses across the country. The appendices include useful materials such as model course syllabi and a policy statement from the University of Missouri, Columbia. The First Year Out: Understanding American Teens after High School.

University of Chicago Press. The author identifies and compares three levels of religiosity among his respondents: They find that when considering possible careers, many students come to the task with a belief that there is a divinely ordained plan for their lives.

Darnell and Sherkat investigate whether a specific religious background, Protestant fundamentalism, affects the educational attainment of children.

Bible colleges are an alternative, yet are too expensive for many families. Therefore, the authors hypothesize that fundamentalist teenagers may not go on to earn college or graduate degrees as often as their peers from non-fundamentalist religious traditions.

They test their hypothesis with data from a study that surveyed young adults three times over the course of 17 years, beginning when they were high schools seniors, and conclude that fundamentalist background does in fact hinder educational achievement. In this paper, Dillon explores whether the religious identities of Catholic students at an elite, non-denominational college reflect this larger pattern.

The author bases her conclusions on results of a sample of 76 completed mail surveys. In this working paper, Ecklund and Scheitle present preliminary findings from their survey of science faculty attitudes toward religion.

  • The authors conclude with future concerns for InterVarsity;
  • The University of Chicago Press, 1992;
  • The effects of the religious composition of the student body an environmental characteristic and the religious attendance of students an involvement variable on many of the above variables are measured and reported.

For some this means drawing on several different traditions in a syncretic fashion to create a purpose and meaning for life outside the self and outside pragmatic day-to-day activity. This book is a resource for faculty who are considering the place of religion in the academy and on college campuses. The book is divided into four parts.

  • This article measures not only religious beliefs but also the prevalence of esoteric beliefs and practices among students;
  • The author complements her quantitative findings with an in-depth case study of an evangelical student group on the campus of a large university;
  • Hartley charts the findings of this research on issues such as how college changes students, how religiosity is changed, how it impacts well-being, and how students today compare in religiosity to students of the past;
  • Learning also requires interpretation, elaboration, and other active processes by the learner.

In Part I the author asks readers to consider stories about the negative consequences of religion that circulate on campuses and inside departments. Part II explores how disciplines socialize their faculty and the ways in which this process of socialization mirrors traditional religious formation.

Part III asks scholars to reflect on their own personal histories and to consider why they have dedicated their lives to learning and teaching, and suggests that this self-reflection may reveal deep convictions underlying their lives as professionals.

The book is notable for the wide array of unusual devotional practices it unearths—sacred tattooing, Gothic clubs, megachurches, rockabilly bands, surf shops, and so forth. Each chapter is essentially an extended ethnography of the beliefs and practices of a particular religious subgroup.

To compare different college environments, students are drawn from one public state university, one Bible College, and one Christian liberal arts university.

The study suggests that the greatest moral development of students takes place during freshman and sophomore years but continues during the last two years of college. The Worldview of Evangelical College Students.

Hammond and Hunter analyze how the social setting of colleges public, private, sectarian, non-sectarian impacts the evangelical worldviews of their students, with the aim of addressing the larger issue of how evangelicalism can be maintained in a society that is becoming increasingly secular. The authors also categorize the colleges by degree of insularity — the degree to which the schools guard against secular influences.

They find that a higher percentage of students who score high on the index i. A Review of Research. Hartley charts the findings of this research on issues such as how college changes students, how religiosity is changed, how it impacts well-being, and how students today compare in religiosity to students of the past.

He also notes certain limitations of the studies done thus far that could be corrected in future research. Harvard University Institute of Politics. Redefining Political Attitudes and Activism: Higher Education Research Institute. The Spiritual Life of College Students: Over 112,000 first-year students at 236 colleges and universities were surveyed in the late summer and early fall of 2004, with a follow-up survey administered to those students in spring 2007.

Spirituality and religiousness correspond with various behaviors: Spirituality and the Professoriate: While recent studies have focused on the religious engagements of college undergraduates, less attention has been paid to the religious engagements of their professors.

What do college instructors believe and how do those beliefs impact their teaching? Researchers at the Higher Education Research Institute address this question and others in a comprehensive, multi-year study of Spirituality in Higher Education.

The data reveals many complexities. In this book, Hoge presents the findings from a number of studies of religious beliefs and practices conducted among college students between 1966 and 1968.