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Exploring the main themes in jane austens pride and prejudice

She is at first, understandably, prejudiced against the nobleman Darcy because of what she perceives as his snobbery and pride, but their dynamic changes as they learn more about each other. Expert Answers Tamara K.

How are the themes of love and marriage explored in Pride and Prejudice?

Certified Educator As the title suggests, the main themes in Pride and Prejudice really are pride and prejudice. Elizabeth is shown to be guilty of prejudicially judging Darcy to be prideful. In addition, it turns out that improper pride is actually the reason behind Elizabeth's prejudice. Finally, while Darcyis recognized as feeling above his company, the reality is that he really is the most noble character in the book and found to actually not have.

As the title suggests, the main themes in Pride and Prejudice really are pride and prejudice.

  • She's prepared to believe anything bad about him to fuel the impression she wants to create for instance, Wickham's story;
  • Mr Collins Collins' pride changes according to whom he's speaking;
  • Elizabeth's friend Charlotte is the one who ends up marrying Mr;
  • With those above him, his pride vanishes and he often humiliates himself;
  • It's the reason why Elizabeth's heart breaks so badly for Jane, because she sees that rare opportunity being taken away from her sister by people who will not accept their family's lower standing;
  • Marriage Pride and Prejudice is a love story, but its author is also concerned with pointing out the inequality that governs the relationships between men and women and how it affects women's choices and options regarding marriage.

Finally, while Darcy is recognized as feeling above his company, the reality is that he really is the most noble character in the book and found to actually not have any improper pride.

We know that pride and prejudice are the most dominant themes in the book because it is these two themes that create the main conflict in the story, which is Elizabeth's dislike of Darcy and Darcy's unrequited love for Elizabeth, also expressed as character vs.

Elizabeth first realizes the error of her judgements after reading Darcy's letter explaining his thoughts on her family's behavior and his history with Wickham.

Pride and Prejudice

It is after this that she realizes she foolishly judged Wickham to be the most amiable man she's met simply because he is conversational and friendly. Likewise, she realizes that she judged Darcy to be a despicable man partially because he is reserved and standoffish and partially because of what Whickham told her about Darcy's treatment of him, which turned out to be all lies.

As Elizabeth herself expresses it: How despicably have I acted. I, who have prided myself on my discernment. Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind.

What is the main theme in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice?

Darcy expresses a very central point towards the beginning of the book. He argues that "pride--where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation" Ch. His point is that people who genuinely do have a greater, more intelligent understanding than others and who act upon principles and morals while others fail to do so really should feel genuine pride.

And he is shown to be right.

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All throughout the novel Austen shows us that there really are people who have limited sense and understanding, such as Mrs. Bennet, and who act in immoral, imprudent ways, such as the rest of the entire Bennet household, especially Lydia, and Wickham.

Darcy, on the other hand, always acts upon morals and principles and even rescues Lydia and the whole Bennet household from disgrace. Hence, Darcy really is shown to be superior in both sense and morals to other characters in the book, which is why Elizabeth says towards the end of the novel, "Indeed he has no improper pride" Ch. However, Darcy is also proven to have felt himself to be above his company and to have looked down on others simply because of their connection with the merchant class.

Darcy makes this realization by the end of the novel and repents having acted upon his principles with "pride and conceit" Ch.

Hence we see that Darcy had genuine reason to appreciate, or take pride in, his sense and morals, but was also guilty of acting in a way that judged and criticized others.