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Myth history and positioning of the constellations serpens and ophiuchus

Serpens is one of the Greek constellations, first catalogued by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century. The constellation is divided into two parts by Ophiuchus, the snake bearer: Serpens myth history and positioning of the constellations serpens and ophiuchus one of the best known nebulae in the sky, the Eagle Nebula Messier 16which in turn contains the Pillars of Creationa star-forming region famously imaged by Hubble.

Serpens has one star brighter than magnitude 3. The brightest star in the constellation is Alpha Serpentis, also known by its traditional name, Unukalhai, with an apparent magnitude of 2. The nearest star is GJ 1224 spectral class M4. Serpens contains more than 15 stars with known planets. The pulsar PSR J1719-1438 has a planet-sized companion that is made primarily of carbon and very dense, which earned it the nickname the Diamond Planet. The star HD 136118 has a red dwarf companion previously thought to be a planet.

There are two meteor showers associated with the constellation, the Omega Serpentids, peaking on December 26, and the Sigma Serpentids, peaking on December 27. Asclepius is usually depicted holding the top half of the snake in his left hand and the tail in his right hand. Asclepius was the son of the god Apollo who was said to be able to bring people back from the dead with his healing powers.

In one of the stories, he killed a snake and saw it be brought back to life by a herb that another snake placed on it. It was said that Asclepius later used the same technique. Serpens constellation dates back to Babylonian times. The Babylonians had two snake constellations. One represented a hybrid of a dragon, lion and bird and roughly corresponded to the constellation we know as Hydra, the water snake. It has an apparent magnitude of 2. The primary component in the system is an orange giant with the stellar classification of K2 III.

The star has a radius about 12 times solar and is 38 times more luminous than the Sun. The companion has a visual magnitude of 11. A 13th magnitude star can also be found in the vicinity, 2. It is an orange star halfway between the subgiant and giant evolutionary stage.

Eta Serpentis has an apparent magnitude of 3. It has a mass double that of the Sun and a radius 5. It is 19 times more luminous than the Sun. It has an apparent magnitude of 3. It is the third brightest star in Serpens. It has a visual magnitude of 3. The primary component in the system is a yellow-white giant with the stellar classification F0IIIp. It is a spectroscopic binary star with an orbital period of 2.

The third component in the system is a 13th magnitude star located 25 arc seconds away from the main pair. It is located in Serpens Caput. The system is a member of the Ursa Major Moving Group of stars. It has the stellar classification of A3V.

Serpens Constellation

The main component in the system is a white main sequence star. The star has two companions, one with a visual magnitude of 9. The star is located in Serpens Caput. It has a radius 1. It has a combined apparent magnitude of 3. Delta Serpentis is composed of two binary stars separated by 66 seconds of arc. The primary component is a yellow white subgiant star with a visual magnitude of 4. The star is classified as a Delta Scuti type variable, exhibiting variations in luminosity by 0.

Serpens Constellation

The two stars are four arc seconds away from each other and have an orbital period of 3,200 years. The second binary pair consists of a 14th magnitude star and a 15th magnitude binary companion separated by 4. It belongs to the spectral class F6 V. The star has an apparent magnitude of 3. It has a mass 1. The star is a suspected variable.

Myth history and positioning of the constellations serpens and ophiuchus

It has two 10th magnitude optical companions. It has an apparent magnitude of 4. The primary component is a white main sequence dwarf with a visual magnitude of 4. The companion has a magnitude of 8.

Ophiuchus Constellation

The star is moving toward the Sun and in about 166,000 years it will come within 7. It has a combined apparent magnitude of 4.

  1. The long tube-like shape of a snake bears a resemblance to an umbilical cord. NGC 6118, a grand-design spiral galaxy, shines bright in this image, displaying its central bar and tight spiral arms from its home in the constellation of Serpens The Snake.
  2. Asclepius was the son of the god Apollo who was said to be able to bring people back from the dead with his healing powers. It gave the herb to the first snake, which immediately recovered.
  3. Herbs have chemical properties and this attribute in snakes of being able to search out herbs might be related to their ability to smell out the chemicals in the herbs. Tau-8 Serpentis 26 Serpentis is a white main sequence dwarf with the stellar classification of A0V.

The brighter component has a visual magnitude of 4. The stars are separated by 22 arc seconds in the sky, and have an orbital period of at least 14,000 years. The stars are 18 and 13 times more luminous than the Sun respectively, and both have masses and radii about twice solar and surface temperatures of 8,000 kelvins. The third component in the system is a yellow star of the spectral type G5, with a visual magnitude of 6.

It is separated from Theta-2 Serpentis by 7 arc minutes. It is a Mira variable, a pulsating variable star very red in colour that will expel its outer envelope to form a planetary nebula and become a white dwarf within a few million years. R Serpentis has an apparent magnitude of 7. It has an apparent magnitude of 5.

The star is an Alpha-2 Canum Venaticorum type variable, a chemically peculiar star exhibiting magnitude variations by 0. It has a visual magnitude that ranges from 5.

Myth history and positioning of the constellations serpens and ophiuchus

The star has a radius 54 times solar and an absolute magnitude of -2. Tau-2 Serpentis 12 Serpentis is a blue-white main sequence star of the spectral type B9V. It has an apparent magnitude of 6.

  1. In one of the myths, Asclepius was given the blood of the Gorgon Medusa by the goddess Athene.
  2. However, it might be that this serpent is a more likely representation.
  3. With an apparent magnitude of 11.
  4. Globular clusters such as these typically harbour some of the oldest stars known, some as old as 13 billion years, born soon after the Universe formed.
  5. It is one of the larger globular clusters known. But those animals that support themselves on four feet, like the lizard and the newt, are not snakes, but are called reptiles reptile.

It has a visual magnitude that varies from 5. The star is approximately 520 light years distant from the Sun. Tau-5 Serpentis 18 Serpentis is a yellow-white main sequence dwarf of the spectral type F3V. It has a visual magnitude of 6. The star is a member of the Ursa Major Stream. It has a radius 11 times solar. Tau-7 Serpentis 22 Serpentis is a white star belonging to the spectral class A2m. Tau-8 Serpentis 26 Serpentis is a white main sequence dwarf with the stellar classification of A0V.

It has a radius double that of the Sun. The star has a confirmed planet and a brown dwarf in its orbit. The planet has a mass 7. HD 136118 HD 136118 is a yellow-white dwarf with an apparent magnitude of 6. It has the stellar classification of F9V.

The American astronomer Debra Fischer discovered a massive planet orbiting the star in February 2002. The object turned out to be a brown dwarf with a mass 42 times that of Jupiter. The dwarf has an orbital period of 1,209 days. Gliese 710 Gliese is an orange main sequence dwarf with the stellar classification of K7 Vk. It has an apparent magnitude of 9. The star is a suspected variable, with variations in magnitude ranging from 9. Within the next 1. When it does, it will be as bright as Antaresthe brightest star in Scorpius constellation.

The cluster is about 80 light years in radius and can be seen without binoculars in extremely good conditions. It is one of the larger globular clusters known. The brightest stars in the cluster have an apparent magnitude of 12. The cluster was discovered by the German astronomer Gottfried Kirch in 1702. Charles Messier discovered it in 1764, but thought it was a nebula.

It was the German-born British astronomer William Herschel who was the first to resolve individual stars in the cluster — about 200 of them — in 1791. M5 in fact contains over 100,000 stars, with some estimates counting as many as 500,000. There are 105 known variable stars in the cluster, among them 97 known RR Lyrae variables. The cluster has an estimated age of about 13 billion years, which makes it one of the older known clusters associated with our galaxy, the Milky Way.

The majority of its stars formed more than 12 billion years ago, but there are some unexpected newcomers on the scene, adding some vitality to this aging population.