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Tannen but what do you mean thesis

  1. In this section, Tannen describes her view of this method that men and women may or may not use.
  2. Tannen does not describe the characters in great detail as they are only a point of reference to here short stories. For the sake of efficiency however, he gets to the point if correction is needed than may buy an employee a beer after work to make up for harshness.
  3. Tannen is just trying to contrast between the way each gender makes use of their delivery in suggestions or criticism.

Specifically, males and females in the workplace. Tannen uses a filing system to organize her claims and evidence. Tannen organizers her essay in a way that is clear and concise, and allows the reader to flow naturally from one idea to another. Each paragraph is like a folder, with the tag sticking up.

  1. Tentativeness — not a final idea, cautious in actions or way of speech. Not only is it a way to keep people on equal footing but it is a way of reassuring.
  2. When the restaurant I work at gets busy often times the servers all need to be in the same place i.
  3. There are different ways Deborah went about introducing these individuals through the article, however I see two common threads in these introductions. In 2009 however, many women apologize less knowing it has become an automatic habit and one that is demeaning to themselves.

This allows readers to understand what she is going to address next, and they can find arguments easily when looking back at her essay. Within her essay, Tannen uses multiple methods in each section to present her arguments.

Questions and Answers on But What Do You Mean by Deborah Tannen

In the Criticism section, Tannen tells a story about a female coworker who co-wrote a report with a male colleague, and was hurt when her coworker criticized the essay right away.

Tannen points out that the woman was expecting a softened response, not sharp criticism right off the bat.

Tannen uses an anecdote to point out her view of males and females in certain situations. This gives the readers a sense of what Tannen is trying to point out, by using a real-life example that the readers can visualize, or even better, relate to. In other sections, Tannen saves the anecdote for the end, like in the fourth section, titled Fighting. In this section, Tannen describes her view of this method that men and women may or may not use.

Categories

At the end, she seamlessly transitions into an anecdote about a female doctor attending a hospital staff meeting. The anecdote ends with a resolution that was reached between the female doctor and a male colleague.

  • Each paragraph is like a folder, with the tag sticking up;
  • Yet there seem to be an underlying consensus that men never want to feel they are at the bottom of the conversation;
  • It was to end the fact that this editor was trying to be softer instead of more direct;
  • There would be no liable information if she was to further her detail of the character.

Even though it looks unconventional, the filing system is an easy way to present evidence and examples clearly and without excessive wording. Each section is titled with a word that describes the main idea, much like a tag on a folder.

In each section, Tannen mixes up how she presents her claims and evidence.

In others, Tannen leaves the section with an anecdote, solidifying her claim and leaving a good impression on the readers. The readers are not lulled into a predictable rhythm that may take their focus off of what she is actually going to say.

  • In the apology section she compares and contrasts apologizing too much and none at all;
  • Specifically, males and females in the workplace;
  • The readers are not lulled into a predictable rhythm that may take their focus off of what she is actually going to say;
  • Let me elaborate into what I believe her meaning is behind these two sentences;
  • Where does she use example, definiton, and comparison and contrast?
  • Even though it looks unconventional, the filing system is an easy way to present evidence and examples clearly and without excessive wording.

Deborah Tannen's essay can be read here: